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Thread: Why did the dog reacted this way?

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    I know.

    Unless the dog is showing clinical signs (which can take a long time to show in an infected animal), they have to check the brain.

    BTW - Dog is currently in quarantine, so its life is certainly not safe yet. There is also a court date set for April.

  2. #12
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    FFS! It is posted on youtube too with the heading "Argentinian Mastiff Bites Kyle Dyer, Ripping Her Lip Off!"
    I am sure the dog did not rip her lip off. **** I hate people.
    Owning a dog should be a partnership. Much like a good marriage it should be based on love, trust and devotion until death do you part.
    R.I.P Dali: 10th May 1998 – 20th December 2011

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC View Post
    Why people feel the need to overcrowd or stick their faces into those of an unknown dog is beyond me. Again as said above, I would of thought she was a nut if she'd done that to me and been highly uncomfortable.
    Because that is what you do with babies!!! Babies can't see very far past their nose in the early infant stages, hence why parents hold babies so close. It's an instinctual thing. Plus it's like giving someone a kiss, to show affection. The reporter looked like she was going to kiss the dog twice in that video, the second time she got bitten.

    People see dogs as babies to protect. They get that maternal/paternal bond going and BAM, they try to give as much affection as possible. This doesn't work for dogs. They're not babies and they're not human.

    If we are to stop dog bites in any country, particularly our country (for patriotic reasons), we need to provide education. Makes me want to go out and propose a dog safety class to primary ad secondary schools right now!

    Oh, and I heard that noise too, but wasn't sure if it was on the set or just the video...?

  4. #14

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    Very sad situation that could have easily been prevented.
    Sammy is near bomb proof, but it's not something I would take chances with, let alone with a dog where you didn't know the history. Sammy seems to understand that people love to hug and kiss and mean no harm by it - and always has. Zoe seems to adhere much more closely to the doberman/rr standards, and love the pda's from us but really would prefer to have nothing to do with anyone else, and is not afraid to express her annoyance (we're aware of it and trying to curb it). It's really sad too, because of course everyone wants to pat the cute puppy whereas the big 'scary' doberman x rottie is the one who wants all the love.

    I wish there was more information available of this sort to the general public. Like the ads about smoking and exercise etc, should be one about dogs. Just a few tips like this could make such a huge difference.

  5. #15
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    That dog was stressed and under pressure. Look at it's body language, the guy had it tight by the collar and it was panting, moving it's head about uncomfortably. THe presenter was rubbing it all over the face, and it was warning her the closer she got. Look right before the bite it bared it's teeth to warn her off, and she kept coming so he nipped her. It happened fast because she went in fast for a kiss and she's an idiot for doing it. They're also stupid for taking an untested, unknown and stressed dog into such a stressful environment and effectively cornering it. Dogo Argentino's are not cuddly wuddly dogs. They are bred for protection and hence do not like their personal space invaded and have an inherent mistrust of strange people, being a more common breed in the USA they should know that.

    No way was the dog at fault in any way in this situation.

  6. #16
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    I don't ever feel the need to shove my face at a baby let alone a strangers baby but I am a person who values my own personal space.

    I do looming exercises in my puppy classes, especially with little dog breeds, in the hope that it will prevent something happening later down the track.

    But you know what always amazes me is that unlike your car or your other posessions people feel they can touch your dog.

    But then I even hate how people think they are doing the right thing by extending their hand to a dog to sniff, as if he/she couldn't smell you before hand. If it wanted to sniff you it would.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC View Post
    I don't ever feel the need to shove my face at a baby let alone a strangers baby but I am a person who values my own personal space.

    I do looming exercises in my puppy classes, especially with little dog breeds, in the hope that it will prevent something happening later down the track.

    But you know what always amazes me is that unlike your car or your other posessions people feel they can touch your dog.

    But then I even hate how people think they are doing the right thing by extending their hand to a dog to sniff, as if he/she couldn't smell you before hand. If it wanted to sniff you it would.
    Agree with everything you say just wondered about the whole sniffing the hand thing; I do notice that if people do that with my dog he more actively sniffs them, and sometimes if he knows and likes the person, gives them a lick. I think sometimes if a person just puts their hand straight onto a dog's head, the dog can freak out a little because they don't know what's potentially in the hand, and maybe, they weren't paying a whole lot of attention to the person before that - there's a lot of smells outside that can be distracted. If they are shown it's a hand, well they still might not want to be patted but at least they will know it's a hand and then they might be able to prepare themselves for what comes next.
    Of course none of it is really ideal, but I can certainly see a difference in the reaction from my dog from when people let him sniff their hand before patting, to just patting with no introduction at all. Luckily he's a dog who asks questions first... Zoe I think is a dog I will have to keep much closer to me because she seems to react first then assess the situation.

  8. #18
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    I taught my daughter to approach strange dogs by letting them sniff her hand when she was two (she always was dog crazy). It was to get the dog's attention more than anything. To prevent her from patting the dog when he isn't really watching her and could get a shock. But the idea is that she watches their body language when she does it. She is only allowed to pat a strange dog if they react to her approach by wagging their tails and look happy with the attention. If they react in any other way - including not showing any interest in her outstretched hand - she is to back off and leave them alone.

    I think it is very similar to dog's sniffing eachother? It's a greeting ritual to vet the other's intentions.

    If the owner is around, she has to ask for the owner's permission before she approaches the dog too. But I will allow her to pat dogs tied up outside the shops as long as she does it in the right way. It was one of the few useful things my own mother taught me because she simply could not keep me away from dogs.

  9. #19
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    I don't allow the skids to touch dogs tied up and they must always ask the owners. But they are not little kids anymore. The first time they went to touch a strangers dog I asked them would they consider touching that strangers car or handbag.

    Having dogs with long snouts and not much stop mine don't like outstretched hands of strangers and particularly don't like them under their chins strangely enough, they need to move their heads to see and follow the hand. I also have aloof breeds, particularly the Borzoi who will withdraw from an outstretched hand and would prefer to come and lean on you when he's ready. They are very much cat like in that they are drawn to the person who is actually not fussed on dogs, the person who doesn't try to make friends with them.

    I guess its a horses for courses type of thing. But I strongly believe considering a dogs strong sense of smell that it's already got a good whiff of you. But will explore something close to it's face or offered. My setter normally thinks a treat might be on offer.
    Last edited by MAC; 02-09-2012 at 04:24 PM.

  10. #20

    Default A great learning too of what not to do

    It's a great demonstration of what not to do to a dog. Don't hug a dog and still your face into his. Plus a stressed dog (lights, new people) will have a lower threshold for aggression.

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