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Thread: Introducing a new baby into a house with dogs...

  1. #11
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    I think people mollycoddle everything too much. There is such a thing as over preparedness IMO.

    I mean maybe I am just crazy but I dont think any prep is necessary.

    When I had my daughter, we had 2 dogs. Chev and Lennox. Chev (staffy/lab female) was 2 and Lennox (staffy/boxer male) was 6 months or so.

    I went into hospital to have the baby and stayed one night. I came home the next day and just walked in with the baby like nothing was any different. And it wasnt.

    The dogs were allowed to lick and sniff her (I think that is where problems arise, people try and keep the dog away from thebaby). They were still allowed on the couch next to me etc. The fact is, newborn babies dont take up any time IMO. They get up every few hours for about half an hour and then they ar eback in bed.

    Anyway, we did no prep. We did decorate the kids room but as usual, the dogs had free reign of the house so were never kept out of there. If she was on the floor for a roll round, they were allowed to lie next to her. And often did. She grew up yanking on their ears and putting chubby little hands in dogs mouths, and sharing food etc etc.

    That was the way it was wehn I grew up and I just didnt see th eneed to do anything differently.

    Liek Beloz said, your dogs should trust you enough to accept anything strange you bring into the house IMO.

    In the end, Lennox absolutely adored the kid. If she was outside playing, or we went to the beach, he was always by her side keeping an eye on her.

    What I did notice though is, before I brought the kids home, the dogs didnt always listen (they were a bit spoilt) but then the day I brang the kid home, they suddenly became super obediant LMAO

  2. #12
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    Jun 2011
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    I agree, provided the dog has also not been the substitute baby or made the centre of the universe.

    Being involved in rescue many dogs have come in because a new baby has arrived or even just a work schedule has changed. The problem is not the new baby or a new job but because the dog was not raised to be a confident and well adjusted dog so that when a change came along it coped.

    I guess the key is knowing your dog and how good a job you did with it.

    And yes being relaxed, calm and confident is good for both the dog and the new baby.

    I know when I married into a ready made family I didn't worry at all about my dogs even though they had never been around kids much. But I did worry about my in-laws JR, he would growl at my step-kids if they entered a room he was in. They were careful sitting on the lounge if he was there and one night my s/daughter slept half the night on the floor because Jack jumped up on the bed after she got up to go to the toilet and wouldn't let her back in bed.
    Last edited by MAC; 02-07-2012 at 10:45 AM.

  3. #13
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    To me the issue often seems to be that when baby arrives the dog becomes completely insignificant in comparison. Perhaps that is indeed caused by some people treating their dog as a substitute baby and then when the real thing arrives they don't have a purpose anymore.

    I started teaching my child from day one that the dog was part of the family and had needs that were just as important as hers. So we went for walks even if it was -5 for example. My daughter saw lots of sunrises from under 3 layers of blankets in the pram!

    In contrast, I have known people who still used the kids as an excuse for never walking their dog when the kids were school age. FFS, just make the kids go for walks with you!

  4. #14
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    At the moment my partner stays home all day and the dog (17wk old Shar Pei X Staffy) happily plays around on the floor and goes for the occasional short walk outside. When i get home i take it for a longer walk and feed it both at night and in the morning. The pup has been in the babys room, its not off limits but the majority of the time the door is closed or just ajar. The baby will be in our room while its in the bassonet, as the dog will sleep in the lounge on its bed (As it currently does - without whining, etc). At the moment he is friendly to all that visit and only gives a little 'huff' occasionally when someone knocks, which we are slowly training him out of.

  5. #15
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    Are you sure you want to train your dog out of barking when someone knocks? I often don't hear knocks on the door and regret that Banjo is the lousiest watch dog ever.

  6. #16
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    My 3 cockatiels are better watch dogs than my 4 dogs.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  7. #17
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    I couldnt imagine training a dog our of making a sound when someone knocks.

    My dogs go berserk when someone answers the door and I love it. It lets me know someone is there and it lets whoever is there know that there are dogs

  8. #18
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    Yes, Oskar carries on too when someone knocks on the door. I am glad he does as well.

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