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Thread: Breeders advice not helpful, where to now?

  1. #11
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    Like the others said - sometimes it's a problem in the brain - would help to get a vet assessment. Remember to warn the vet the dog is now "snappy".

    What exactly do you do when the dog snaps - because this may be encouraging it. Eg scolding, and firm taps on the dog's nose are likely to encourage snapping. There could have been some superficial injury that started the snapping, and the attempted fix may have made the behaviour worse. What exactly triggers the snapping? Just it just happen randomly (probably a brain thing) or only if another person or dog approaches or only when there is food around (maybe behavioural) or what?

    Some things can be fixed by training, some by meds and some can't eg terminal brain cancer. If it is disease thing - then please ask your vet to send the details of the dog, its breeding and the disease to the LIDA database.

    http://sydney.edu.au/vetscience/lida/dogs/

  2. #12

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    To answer some questions/points raised

    I have spent a long time on the net researching cocker temperament and Consider myself an intelligent experienced dog owner. I have also completed a TAFE animal studies certificate course, and fostered dogs with behavioural problems (not this one though) so am no fool. The same can be said of my husband, we have enjoyed well behaved, social dogs for over 40 years.

    I found the clubs rescue contact person's attitude unhelpful overall. When i started to outline the problem, without even mentioning rage syndrome, she immediately said "dont tell me he has rage syndrome. There is no such thing"....She was the person whom I thought would be very helpful but I suppose because I mentioned the words snappy and bite, she wanted nothing to do with it,,,perhaps worried about possible legal problems if dog actually bit someone? I was amused too (not) by the breeder saying another reason she could not take him back was because he was no use to her, being desexed. So, although the rescue contact stated in my first call to her that the club will take back a problem dog, it seems they have conditions when faced with this. Overall, I was disappointed by the lack of helpful advice and it blew me away that both stated among the possible solutions was to euthanase him or sell him on a website.

    He is going to the vet on Monday. At this stage we will keep him, invest in a soft muzzle only if necessary. If he continues to escalate we will re-evaluate.

  3. #13

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    See what the vet says, Dollyhouse, but I really think you should have a behaviourial assessment done by a reputable trainer. If you let us know what area you are in, we can recommend someone to you.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Southern NSW
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    Good luck..........Sounds more Medical to me. Sudden onsets often are, especially seeing you guys are experienced dog owners. Hoping you can find a solution or at least know what you are dealing with.

    And please let us know what is happening.........It is very sad when things like this happen, so difficult to deal with.
    Pets are forever

  5. #15
    Join Date
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    Val Bonney - long time dog trainer - in conversation with Richard Fidler - said the only dog that really tried to eat her and would not respond to any training effort - in post mortem - they found a cancer in its brain.

    I don't know anything about Rage syndrome - this is the first I've read of it. But I do know animals - can get extremely grumpy from medical problems - injuries, disease and hormone/chemical imbalances.

    Glad you expanded on your dog training experience and qualifications. Couldn't really tell from the opening post. I know some very experienced dog club instructors that could make the same claims as you about their experience and qualifications but they're stuck in some very old school methods of dog training that only work with a very few dogs.

  6. #16
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    Jan 2012
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    First port of call is always a veterinarian. Dogs do not just snap for no reason and most of the time there is some form of pain. Cocker rage is rare, and because of tarnishing the breeds reputation most breeders are on the defensive. It also became an excuse for people not being bothered to train their dogs, it would nip them, and they'd blame the breeders.

    After that though contact yourself someone like K9Pro.com.au for an assessment of the dog.

  7. #17

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    I don't know that I would necessarily be getting vet to do behavioural assessment- I would be looking down the neuro path first- I work in rescue and we have had dogs surrendered who have suddenly 'turned' many have had brain tumors- not to alarm you. In this day and age with dog attacks so much in the media and public eye a vet- unless it is a fabulous one- is going to go through your dogs 'behaviour' with a fine tooth comb and be reluctant to sign off if it shows even the smallest amount of aggression and then will present you with one option... I have seen this happen far too many times

  8. #18

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    I believe everyone who mentioned seeing a Vet were recommending they get a health check done to make sure there are no health issues with the dog.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    I believe everyone who mentioned seeing a Vet were recommending they get a health check done to make sure there are no health issues with the dog.
    I even said I wouldn't trust a vet to give behaviourial advice LOL

  10. #20

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    I've heard of this rage thing with the red cockers. Would this be likely to start at 3ish? Not my first choice of dog, so I don't know if it can be treated or calmed. I'd love to hear about what can be done. I'd understood they were just frighteningly, suddenly savage and there wasn't much that could be done. I remember thinking, I'm so glad that doesn't happen in my favorite breeds, tho' I usually end up with mongrels. (No breeding, rescue only dogs).

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