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Thread: In search for a new family companion

  1. #71
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    Aug 2011
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    I think the biggest issue is the being alone during the day. It was the first thing I asked about when I enquired about rescue dogs. I got knocked back for a few dogs because the foster carers didn't think the dog would cope with being home alone all day as an only dog. I know exercise and training can help a dog to cope with being alone, but not always. Personally, having a dog prone to barking, escaping or being destructive when left alone, was not something I was willing to take on.

  2. #72
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    Aug 2011
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    I have owned Amstaff's and staffy's before.

    Staffy's are very destructive when they are bored, lonely or stressed. They are also a very excitable dog.
    if you are to leave one alone for lengthy periods of time, you need to leave things for it to do in the yard.

    Things like putting chicken scraps or similar in an ice cream container full of water and freezing it.
    make sure it has plenty of things to keep it occupied.

    while it's still not desirable to leave a staffy alone for 10 hours, this will help
    "He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion" Author Unknown

  3. #73
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    Just from experience with many GSD's......They are a beautiful dog and i adore them. I was brought up amongst them as my Dad was a Breeder/Trainer of GSD's. They need a lot of time and are very dependent, personally I don't think GSD's do all that well for many hours alone. Not that many dogs do anyway. But some breeds are more independent and cope better........
    Pets are forever

  4. #74
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    I agree with newfsie. I grew up with GSD and they were pretty needy. Because they are so clever, they need lots of stimulation to keep them happy and in good mental health. Though I could be wrong, I believe they are less prone to destructive behaviour than some other dogs. They are prone to obsessive behaviour though. We had one who developed an obsession with chasing trains on the track next to the railway. To a point where it threatened his health.

    But possibly if you are committed to doing lots of training with them, they may be ok with that lifestyle. Talk to some GSD owners about it?

  5. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Thanks for sharing the link - I checked it last night and will make some phone calls during the week. Partner is interested with German Shepherds on the list, I am personally interested with the American bulldogs in the list.

  6. #76
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    Here is some information on the temperaments of those breeds.

    The American Bulldog is loyal, reliable, brave and determined. Not a hostile dog. Alert and self-confident, this breed genuinely loves children. It is known for its acts of heroism towards its master. They have strong protective instincts, and need a firm, confident, consistent pack leader. Well-socialize and obedience train them at an early age, to prevent them from becoming reserved with strangers. Without that strong minded pack leader who can tell the dog what is expected of them, they may be aggressive with other dogs. They need to be around people and know their place in their pack to be truly happy. This breed tends to drool and slobber. Without enough daily mental and physical exercise they will become high strung and may become hard to handle.
    Often used as working dogs, German Shepherds are courageous, keen, alert and fearless. Cheerful, obedient and eager to learn. Tranquil, confident, serious and clever. GSDs are extremely faithful, and brave. They will not think twice about giving their lives for their human pack. They have a high learning ability. German Shepherds love to be close to their families, but can be wary of strangers. This breed needs his people and should not be left isolated for long periods of time. They only bark when they feel it is necessary. Often used as police dogs, the German Shepherd has a very strong protective instinct, and are extremely loyal to their handler. Socialized this breed well starting at puppyhood. Aggression and attacks on people are due to poor handling and training. Problems arise when an owner allows the dog to believe he is pack leader over humans and or does not give the dog the mental and physical daily exercise they need to be stable. This breed needs owners who are naturally authoritative over the dog in a calm, but firm, confident and consistent way. A stable, well-adjusted, and trained dog is for the most part generally good with other pets and excellent with children in the family. They must be firmly trained in obedience from an early age. German Shepherds who have passive owners and or who's instincts are not being met can become timid, skittish and may be prone to fear biting and develop a guarding issue. They should be trained and socialized from an early age. German Shepherds will not listen if they sense that they are stronger minded than their owner, however they will also not respond well to harsh discipline. Owners need to have an air of natural authority to their demeanor. Do not treat this dog as if he were human. Learn canine instincts and treat the dog accordingly. German Shepherds are one of the smartest and most trainable breeds. With this highly skilled working dog comes a drive to have a job and a task in life and a consistent pack leader to show them guidance. They need somewhere to channel their mental and physical energy. This is not a breed who will be happy simply laying around your living room or locked out in the back yard. The breed is so intelligent and learns so readily that it has been used as a sheepdog, guard dog, in police work, as a guide for the blind, in search and rescue service, and in the military. The German Shepherd also excels in many other dog activities including schutzhund, tracking, obedience, agility, flyball, and ring sport. His fine nose can sniff out drugs and intruders, and can alert handlers to the presence of underground mines in time to avoid detonation, or gas leaks in a pipes buried 15 feet underground. The German Shepherd is also a popular show and family companion.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  7. #77
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    If you openly desribe our lifestyle and what you can offer the dog to the foster carers like you did here, they will give you an honest answer about whether or not they think the dog would suit you. They won't always be completely right, but I found it a pretty good way to go about finding a suitable dog.

    I found it helped me to make a list of what I was looking for in a dog, and what I was willing to deal with and what not. For example, I had 'friendly with other dogs' at the top of my list as I was looking for a slightly older dog and had had a dog who was poorly socialised before and didn't want to have to deal with that. Another thing I did not want to take on was a barky dog. Other requirements were that they would be able to cope with being alone for about 35 hours a week and didn't require more than an hour of excercise a day. I didn't care what the dog looked like, apart from wanting a medium sized dog (and no fluffy white one). I also preferred not to get a hunting dog because I my old dog was a mix of hunters and there are some downsides. It took me a few weeks of browsing pet rescue and making phone calls. I also went out to meet a dog at the RSPCA, but it didn't "click". So then I saw Banjo on the website, contacted the foster carer, found she ticked all the boxes and did an 800km round trip to get her. And she lived up to my expectations. She did come with one problem behaviour, which was jumping up, but she's getting better every day.

    Good luck! I hope you find what you are looking for.

  8. #78
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    Jan 2012
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    Mornington Peninsula, Victoria
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    I would probably not reccommend a Staffy, unless you will be spending most of your time at home for the next 15 years..they are fantastic dogs with great temperaments however, are prone to get seperation anxiety if not raised correctly (any dog can get it, but staffy's are more prone than most breeds) they are very needy, and need lots of exercise, and stimulation, if i were you, i would do some serious research, and choose a dog based upon suitability rather than looks..to ensure you dont have to rehome it. Best of luck!

  9. #79

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    I saw some gorgeous Amstaffs on te weekend at shows, one big male being led from the ring and hugged non stop by a tiny little girl about 2-ish, her dad was showing him and she just adored him. So cute.

  10. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    If you openly desribe our lifestyle and what you can offer the dog to the foster carers like you did here, they will give you an honest answer about whether or not they think the dog would suit you. They won't always be completely right, but I found it a pretty good way to go about finding a suitable dog.

    I found it helped me to make a list of what I was looking for in a dog, and what I was willing to deal with and what not. For example, I had 'friendly with other dogs' at the top of my list as I was looking for a slightly older dog and had had a dog who was poorly socialised before and didn't want to have to deal with that. Another thing I did not want to take on was a barky dog. Other requirements were that they would be able to cope with being alone for about 35 hours a week and didn't require more than an hour of excercise a day. I didn't care what the dog looked like, apart from wanting a medium sized dog (and no fluffy white one). I also preferred not to get a hunting dog because I my old dog was a mix of hunters and there are some downsides. It took me a few weeks of browsing pet rescue and making phone calls. I also went out to meet a dog at the RSPCA, but it didn't "click". So then I saw Banjo on the website, contacted the foster carer, found she ticked all the boxes and did an 800km round trip to get her. And she lived up to my expectations. She did come with one problem behaviour, which was jumping up, but she's getting better every day.

    Good luck! I hope you find what you are looking for.
    Fully understand, this is why I keep studying about breeds I am looking for and making sure it will suit our family. Like I mentioned earlier in this thread is to rehome another family member, I've been to that path and will not do it again.

    Quote Originally Posted by crazybullylover View Post
    I would probably not reccommend a Staffy, unless you will be spending most of your time at home for the next 15 years..they are fantastic dogs with great temperaments however, are prone to get seperation anxiety if not raised correctly (any dog can get it, but staffy's are more prone than most breeds) they are very needy, and need lots of exercise, and stimulation, if i were you, i would do some serious research, and choose a dog based upon suitability rather than looks..to ensure you dont have to rehome it. Best of luck!
    Do you mean all staffy breeds?

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