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Thread: In search for a new family companion

  1. #31
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    Aug 2011
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    pbk, I think some of us may be a bit apprehensive because you have previously rehomed two dogs. I know you had your reasons and you did what you thought was best for the dogs. But I think it is natural that some may feel concerned that you might rehome your next dog too if they don't fit your lifestyle, which makes it extra important to make the right choice.

    As long as you know what to expect - as you haven't owned a dog when you're living away from your parents - and are committed to do whatever it takes to meet the dog's needs and keep them for life, I'm sure you will make that right choice.

  2. #32
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    Dec 2011
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    Logan, Brisbane QLD
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    At the end of the day this person has already rehomed 2 dogs because they did not fit into the OP's lifestyle. I think k&p is well within her rights of making some certain "judgements" on this person & voicing her opinion in whether this person is fit enough to own an amstaff according to her requirements (doesn't have much time for excercise). I understand everybody has the right to work, doesn't mean that the dog has to suffer because of it, instead get a dog that meets lifestyle requirements

  3. #33
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    Dec 2011
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    Logan, Brisbane QLD
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    My own mother made a wrong judgement in getting a shitzu X cattle dog - thinking it would be more shitzu than cattle dog, can't totally blame her though, i was there too when she made the choice so i'm part to blame. She works very long hours 6am -5pm as a cafe manager, often having to cover other people asses that don't show up to work. Anyway she has this little bichon that was quite happy to sleep on the couch all day, and then this "cattle dog" who was ripping up the backyard because he was so damn bored and had all this energy to burn, so as my hours decreased at work i was able to take him for works in the afternoon & take him to the park to socialize, he now pretty much lives with me during the day and my mother picks him up on her way home from work. My point is, if you go ahead and get yourself a dog that is a "high energy" breed what are you prepared to do if he starts behaving this way? Are you prepared to pay a walker to perhaps take him for a walk whilst your at work, maybe even get him into doggy day care a couple of times a week? Or will he be rehomed too??

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    pbk, I think some of us may be a bit apprehensive because you have previously rehomed two dogs. I know you had your reasons and you did what you thought was best for the dogs. But I think it is natural that some may feel concerned that you might rehome your next dog too if they don't fit your lifestyle, which makes it extra important to make the right choice.

    As long as you know what to expect - as you haven't owned a dog when you're living away from your parents - and are committed to do whatever it takes to meet the dog's needs and keep them for life, I'm sure you will make that right choice.
    This is exactly what I want to avoid to rehome a dog, it is not a good experience and does not look too good at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kuri_89 View Post
    At the end of the day this person has already rehomed 2 dogs because they did not fit into the OP's lifestyle. I think k&p is well within her rights of making some certain "judgements" on this person & voicing her opinion in whether this person is fit enough to own an amstaff according to her requirements (doesn't have much time for excercise). I understand everybody has the right to work, doesn't mean that the dog has to suffer because of it, instead get a dog that meets lifestyle requirements
    I take everyone's opinion and suggestions very seriously - remember that it will not be just my decision what dog we get, it will be a family decision as we are looking for a new family member.

    As mentioned before if any member who can spare sopme time to lecture me about Staffy and AMSTAFF it wil be much appreciated.
    Also, as mentioend the idea of Mastiff and Bulldog will be highly considered.

  5. #35
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    Aug 2011
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    Hi pbk.

    I have a Bullmastiff and he certainly dosnt need a lot of exercise infact too much can cause joint issues until they are fully grown at about 12-18 months. He chases the hose for about 20 minutes every arvo and the odd walk to the shops keeps him happy. They eat alot, sleep alot and fart alot. They also make great family members especially with young kids. He dosnt leave much hair about but when he's bigger the drool factor can be a bit messy. My neighbour has a staffy and he dosnt give it much attention or exercise. It has destroyed most of his outdoor furniture and anything that gets left outside. Good luck choosing a new pet.


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  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    Hi pbk.

    I have a Bullmastiff and he certainly dosnt need a lot of exercise infact too much can cause joint issues until they are fully grown at about 12-18 months. He chases the hose for about 20 minutes every arvo and the odd walk to the shops keeps him happy. They eat alot, sleep alot and fart alot. They also make great family members especially with young kids. He dosnt leave much hair about but when he's bigger the drool factor can be a bit messy. My neighbour has a staffy and he dosnt give it much attention or exercise. It has destroyed most of his outdoor furniture and anything that gets left outside. Good luck choosing a new pet.
    The most thing I am preventing to happen, I love my outdoor settings and would love to keep them in excellent nic at all time - thanks Sean

  7. #37
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    Sep 2010
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    Gippsland, Victoria
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    pbk... No matter what breed your family decide to welcome into your home, some prior preparation is always the best path to success.

    There are heaps of great threads here on the forum- particularly in the 'dog training' section, but also in the sections for specific breeds... Just take some time to really look around the forum and read through some threads because there is alot of information there to jump start your learning.

    I would also bee looking around where you live to see if there is a dog training club close to you, and going along to see if it will suit your needs for when you finally bring your dog home. If you don't like what you see, you may have to go a little farther afield... But to have already considered where you might go, if it suits, costs etc, you will be well ahead.

    You can also go to dog shows to see dogs and talk to individual breeders to really get an idea what particular breeds are like. As you are in NSW, there will be a state level organization that will cover when and where shows are happening. You don't have to want to show a dog, it's just a terrific way to learn.

    I'd also highly recommend looking at rescues and shelters- you just may meet the right dog for your lifestyle when you least expect it!

    Good luck with whichever breed you decide upon.

    (and just a plug for greyhounds- sooooo nice!!)

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    pbk... No matter what breed your family decide to welcome into your home, some prior preparation is always the best path to success.

    There are heaps of great threads here on the forum- particularly in the 'dog training' section, but also in the sections for specific breeds... Just take some time to really look around the forum and read through some threads because there is alot of information there to jump start your learning.

    I would also bee looking around where you live to see if there is a dog training club close to you, and going along to see if it will suit your needs for when you finally bring your dog home. If you don't like what you see, you may have to go a little farther afield... But to have already considered where you might go, if it suits, costs etc, you will be well ahead.

    You can also go to dog shows to see dogs and talk to individual breeders to really get an idea what particular breeds are like. As you are in NSW, there will be a state level organization that will cover when and where shows are happening. You don't have to want to show a dog, it's just a terrific way to learn.

    I'd also highly recommend looking at rescues and shelters- you just may meet the right dog for your lifestyle when you least expect it!

    Good luck with whichever breed you decide upon.

    (and just a plug for greyhounds- sooooo nice!!)
    Yes, I am doing my best to gather as much information I can. IN next few weeks will visit dog owners, kennels and local RSPCA to personally look at dog breeds I listed.

  9. #39
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    Mar 2011
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    SE QLD
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    I've got two amstaffies. There is no one home at my house between 8 and 5.30 five days a week and the dogs are lucky to get a half hour walk daily. They are outside when we are at work and when we go to bed and the rest of the time they are inside with me and the OH either sleeping or playing.

    Both are pretty well behaved although Bella is a notorious chewer, anything and everything she can get her paws on will be destroyed if you don't take it off her. They are easy to train, but you need to be willing to put on the effort as everyone has said previously. Socialisation with other dogs is also very important.

    The puppy stage can be pretty full on, Harley is just getting out of that stage now and has settled down a lot. Bella is only two so can still be pretty full on at times (poor Harley).

    Secure fences are a must because these dogs, while only small can jump very high and get out of anything.

    They are great pets but you have to be prepared for them, they can be very high energy. And while mine do fine on the exercise they get (we are on acreage too so they run around a lot) you will find others need way more.

    Also I agree with Choppa (I think) that said to forget about looking for the blue colouring and look for the type of pup you want in any colour, there is no difference personality wise between a blue stafford and a stafford (which from your posts sounds like you think there is)

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  10. #40

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    I have only scanned the thread so forgive me if I'm repeating stuff.

    If you like more size an Amstaff would seem more suited, and more likely to be available (as a healthy individual) in blue if you have our heart set on one colour. Be very cautious though, if you want an Amstaff, taking the time to find one with ANKC registration papers is a very, very worthwhile investment.

    This will give you recourse from legislation that resticts Pits, and sould you ever need to travel to Vic, could save your dog's life. Even in NSW, not having to deal with the laws around Pits is a huge advantage and can save much heartbreak and $$. Not that I'm critical of pitbulls, I actualy like them best of the bull breeds. But wouldn't own them unless I lived in the ACT.

    Anther breed you may consider, which is a very large breed and obviously available in the blue colour you admire, is the Neopoltan Mastiff.

    A Neo, or a quality Amstaff with ANKC papers may cost a little more. But if you divide that purchase price over the lifespan of the dog it seems far more reasonable. A dog is an investment you live in close contact with with every day, so careful consideration and the extra few dollars can be more than worth it in the long run.

    As tempting as they may seem, I would recommend steering well clear of any blue Staffordshires, as the colour is linked with numerous health conditions. You may luck out and get a heathy one but is it worth the risk??

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