Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 47

Thread: Does your dog love someone else ?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    The dogs are all mine, they love the rest of the family and get excited when the skids come home from their mothers if they go there for a weekend & when hubby gets home from work, but if I was to walk in one direction and hubby and the skids in another they choose me. Tilly can jump the front gate, but she only ever does it if I walk one or more of the other dogs without her. Yet hubby and the skids can leave her behind and walk the other dogs and she never follows them.

    Sometimes at night hubby will tell me to sit down & relax because there is a trail of 7 dogs pottering around after me.

    They don't fret when I'm not home and eat fine etc, I'm just their preferred human is all.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    203

    Default

    my staffy cross is definitely 'my' dog. He loves EVERYONE but I only have to give him a look and he stops doing whatever he is doing. He will sit and stare at me with adoring eyes occasionally and he always snuggles with me at night, and if I'm late coming home he will be waiting on my bed for me.

    My husky on the other hand loves me totally, she is the happiest when I come home but then my brother comes home (he live in Canberra) and she is ALL OVER HIM!! She has such a crush it's adorable, she can't get close enough to him and she has that gorgeous husky look like pat me, I love you haha
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." - Edward Hoagland

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Pentland Hills Vic
    Posts
    18

    Default

    My first Aussie terrier Bailey is totally mine, I would go as far as saying he is my heart dog....he still loves my hubby & everyone else he meets, but we have a very special bond.

    My second Aussie terrier Brandy pretty much loves us evenly....she doesn't really have favourites, same for our 13 yo Aussie terrier x JRT Jessie.
    Jasper the little boy we kept from our first litter is a really daddy's boy....he worships the ground my hubby walks on, follows him everywhere & sits at the front door every day from 5.30pm (hubby gets home from work at 6.00pm ) waiting to welcome home. He will also listen to him the most, & my hubby has found it very easy to train him.
    He still loves me & everyone he meets, but he sure does love his dad the most.


    Terraozzi Australian Terriers

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Brisbane QLD
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I've been bitten by the old green eyed monster 'Jealousy'.

    I picked him out, i feed him, wash him, train him, medicate him, get up at 1.30 am for toilet times, hug him and just love him.
    I've tried my hardest to bond with him and while i know he loves me i know he has someone else....

    He ditches me as soon as my daughter wakes up or comes home. He follows her around like a shadow and ignores me unless i'm making his dinner

    I guess i should be gratefull he gets along with the kids so well and he is very protective of them both but i cant understand what the big attraction is. She's noisy, rough, at times just plain mean and sometimes just bloody annoying yet he puts up with it all and goes back for more. Is it the old 'treat em mean keep em keen' thing ? Maybe i'm too full on ? My last dog worshipped the ground i walked on. I'm not used to been 2nd choice. I used to be top dog.

    LOL...
    Does your dog love someone else ?
    I come across this scenario quite often whilst assisting people on civy street with dog behavior problems. Because the canine mind works functionally quite differently than the human mind we often fall victim to Anthropomorphism (thinking that the dog thinks like a human thinks) and this causes us to become confused as to why dogs do certain things. Dogs are not primarily verbal communicators, rather their primary means of communication is body language and vocalisation is their secondary means of communication. Children are far more tactile and hands-on with their interactions with dogs so it stands to reason that dogs will understand children and enjoy the actions of children of certain ages then they will with some adults who might be a little hands-off and extremely verbal in their communication with the dog.

    Another similar scenario I deal with is one where the wife is the primary care giver to the dog and the husband has little to do with the dog and in many cases the husband actually dislikes the dog. While the dog is at home with the wife during the day the dog happily follows her around and is quite compliant to her commands. However this all changes the moment the husband comes home, the dogs focus shifts almost totally to the husband and becomes non-compliant with the wife. Now many women take offense to being treated like this by the dog.... however it's really nothing personal at all....... it's all about relative rank. before spelling it out in detail let's look at a human parallel......

    You are sitting at your desk at work diligently working away at your normal tasks when your immediate superior walks up behind you and stands right behind you at your desk and says nothing..... at this point in time you are acutely aware of his presence and possible a bit uncomfortable. However what happens about those feelings toward your immediate superior if the CEO of the company then walks into the office and starts talking to you...... straight away the presence of your immediate superior becomes irrelevant. Dogs, just like humans, are always aware of the highest ranking dog in the room and it is that highest ranking dog that they must be most mindful of. It's not that your dogs loves you less, far from it, but rather the consequences of upsetting you are nothing compared to the consequences of upsetting the higher ranking dog
    Regards,
    Grant 'The Paw Man'
    RAAF Police Dog Handler, 33 yrs service & Civilian Canine Behavior Specialist

  5. #25

    Default

    My dog is glued to me.. I wish she would like others *sigh*

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sunshine Coast
    Posts
    1,828

    Default

    Thankyou Grant! That EXPLAINS a lot!!!! lol

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    I dunno about that Grant. It's a bit too hierachical for me.

    My dog will take me completely for granted, sometimes ignores what I tell her - especially if the people who are free with their treats show up. Even if I've got much better treats like steak vs kibble. But all I have to do is hide and she comes looking. A few times people have offered to take her for a walk because I've been busy and she was going to be spending time in the crate. But she was very happy to be with them so long as they didn't leave line of sight with me.

    She's gotten a bit better at being parked with other people - when I need to go do things, but won't go so far as a walk.

    Personally - I'm always more bothered by the immediate superior because usually the CEO has nothing to do with me getting paid or even working there. Its purely a (time wasting) social call. Though the social calls from the CEOs can bother the immediate superior.

    I do remember an civvie working with the army, describing in a job interview for a civvie public servant job in how he'd drop everything the lower ranked superior wanted done in favour of doing something trivial for the General. And never mind if he'd actually said what that would mean didn't get done, the General might choose different priorities. Not the brightest choice. Pretty sure that doesn't apply to doggy interactions.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 01-20-2012 at 09:36 PM.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Brisbane QLD
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I dunno about that Grant. It's a bit too hierarchal for me.
    With me it's ALL about the hierarchy!! Both canines and humans live in hierarcal groups. That hasn't changed and is unlikely to change in the near future. I very much support the pack hierarchal theory/dominance model in my ideology. I hear many say that the dominance model is outdated but I am yet to see whatever they replace it with both explain and solve canine behavior problems. When it comes to cars the later the model the better it generally is.... but this does not necessarily apply to dog training ideology. I see academics coming out of university with their fancy degrees in animal behavior saying that the dominance model/pack hierarchy model is no longer applicable and then they go off about the 'new' theories that coincidentally are very politically correct.... hmmmmm... have dogs changed they way their minds work? Have dogs suddenly embraced political correctness? No.

    I have a highly respected Veterinary Canine Behaviorist who refers his clients to me that he has been working with for up to 2 years and been unable to make significant progress with and I solve the behavior problems in one 3 hour session. This person has two university degrees, I have none. This person says that the dominance model and pack hierarchy theory are outdated and have no place in solving dog behavior problems...... yet when they can't solve a dogs problems after working with dog and owner for 2 years and they refer the client to me and I resolve the problem (using the dominance model and pack hierarchy theory) in a single 3 hour session then I see no reason to change my ideology just to align myself with political correctness. In fact I believe that political correctness has done a lot of harm to dog training in the civilian realm.

    I personally believe that 'positive-only' dog trainers are just the result of what happens when you apply political correctness to dog training. I don't think positive-only dog trainers are wrong, but that their approach is someone synthetic and incomplete. I like to keep things basic when it comes to canine behavior, and stick with the fundamentals (without Political Correctness) such as; Rewards create behaviors and cause behaviors to repeat and escalate, but aversives cause behavior to diminish in frequency and extinguish. I avoid using words like 'punishments' or 'corrections' and these words have human connotations that are not desirable when applied to the canine. An aversive is merely the negative consequence of the dog doing something wrong, in the same way that a reward is merely the positive consequence of the dog doing something right.

    To ignore the concept of hierarchy within canine/human groups, to me is to turn ones back on one of the very foundations of canine behavior. That's why your comment surprised me. Happy to hear your perspective on my comments though.
    Regards,
    Grant 'The Paw Man'
    RAAF Police Dog Handler, 33 yrs service & Civilian Canine Behavior Specialist

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,291

    Default

    I can tell we will have lots of interesting debates now you have joined us, Paw Man!

    I don't think the new ways of dog training have been invented just because of political correctness though. Although admittedly, for the inexperienced dog trainer - which is the majority of people with companion dogs - positive only training is a lot safer for the dog than any training that uses corrections. It doesn't matter if you make mistakes with PR training. You can just start again and no harm done. But you can do a lot of harm if you use corrections the wrong way and most people would have no idea on how to undo the damage. It is one of my main reasons to avoid using corrections on my dog. But others here will be able to explain the mechanism of what you call the new training methods much better. And are way better at implementing them than me too. With any training method, it all depends on how the trainer implements them!

    Also, I think the dominance theory is just too black and white to make it totally believable to me. Firstly there is the fact that the observations of wolves that the theory was based on were based on artificial family groups in captivity. And in the meantime it is widely accepted that they do not match the behaviour of family groups of wolves in the wild. Where you also have the dynamics of puppies and mothers, adolescents, etc. They all get treated differently and they all play a different role. Secondly there is the assumption that a dog would not adapt its behaviour when living with humans as opposed to living with wild wolves/dogs. We cannot successfully imitate pack dynamics because we are not dogs and clearly our dogs know that we are not.

    One of my favourite animals is the African wild dog. I know it is not related directly to our domestic dogs, but they're dogs nevertheless. And I am always amazed at how non-confrontational and egalitarian their pack life is. Sure, the dominant female and male have breeding rights and they do get to eat first - but together with the pups and they will take food home for the babysitters! Much more sophisticated than just a straight hierarchical line.

    Obviously I am not doubting that your training methods work for the dogs that you have trained. But as far as theory goes, I don't think it is necessary to involve pack structure into it.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Brisbane QLD
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I can tell we will have lots of interesting debates now you have joined us, Paw Man!

    Obviously I am not doubting that your training methods work for the dogs that you have trained. But as far as theory goes, I don't think it is necessary to involve pack structure into it.
    I like to look at it a slightly different way. With a debate there are opposing views and a winner and a loser.... that doesn't really apply to dog training because we all acknowledge that there are many different ways to successfully train a dog and no single one of them is 'the' way making the others wrong..... they are just all different. We don't need to promote our preferred method to others, but we can present our alternate methods to others to expand their knowledge base and give them a wider choice of available methods to choose from.

    In relation to your second comment above; I spend far more time training people these days than dogs. Dogs are very easy to train very quickly...... but 'people'..... now THERE's a species that's difficult to train With my civilian business outside the Air Force I have a 3 hour window in which to identify the problem behaviors in the dog, determine the cause of the problems (not always possible) and then discover what the owners are doing wrong (always the hardest part) and then identify all the myths and old wives tales the owners have in their knowledge base and then tactfully show them how we can prove their incorrect knowledge is actually incorrect and the effect their errors have had on the dog. Then I re-educate them in the simplest possible way. I don't have time to get technical and teach them about conditioned stimulus and unconditioned stimulus, or about the 4 quadrants of operant conditioning.... to the average dog owner all that is just scientific gobbledegook and does not help them understand their particular dogs problems. I break dog psychology down to its simplest components and following the 'Kiss' principle we then apply their new found knowledge to the dog usually in the last 20 minutes of the three hour consultation. I do on average 120-140 consults per year and I might get 3-5 dogs a year that I have difficulty with but I get at least one difficult human client per week

    Getting a dog to do what you want it to do is easy..... getting a human to do what you want is the real skill
    Regards,
    Grant 'The Paw Man'
    RAAF Police Dog Handler, 33 yrs service & Civilian Canine Behavior Specialist

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •