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Thread: People Who Needs Support to Be Able to Keep Their Pets

  1. #11
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    Oh I can be judgemental and rude - as can many of the people here.

    I hate dogs that get traded around the rescue system - one NSW dog rescue does that as a matter of course and many of the dogs there are unrehomable in part due to that.

    I wish people had the guts to have their dogs put down. I would never be away from mine had I the opportunity. I am glad - as anyone who is grieving can be - that I didn't let Cappy linger - soon as I saw him lying there I said NO. It broke my heart but it was horrible to see him like that.

  2. #12
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    I don't know about strength - it is a decision I have made for dogs for over 15 years and i will make as my final gift for many years to come.

  3. #13
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    As Occy said there are some people who should rehome their dogs and don't. It makes life miserable for both dog and owner.

    I had to rehome a Pug I purchased simply because he didn't fit in. Luther was a little man who needed to be an only dog. He wasn't aggressive towards my other Pugs but he was pushy and demanding and wanted me all to himself. I could have kept him. I nearly did but that would have been unfair on the dog, myself and my other animals. Luther went to a fantastic home with an active retired lady. The two were inseperable for many years. Luther had a much better life than living as part of "the gang" with me.

    The important thing is to do the right thing by the dog. I knew Pugs well so my problem wasn't ignorance of the breed. All dogs are individuals and Luther needed the type of life I couldn't give him.

    Having said this, during the many years I spent working full time in Welfare I found the reasons why most people surrendered their dogs very annoying. Most of these people didn't want to learn. They had bought a cute puppy on impulse and once it began to grow and develop problems they wanted to get rid of it. Six months later they would buy another cute little bundle from the pet shop.

    There were however some very sad cases where people genuinely hated parting with their pets. Many of these were elderly people, often still numbed by the loss of a spouse. The kids were encouraging them to go into a retirement village and most don't allow pets. These dogs and cats were often elderly as well with little hope of finding new homes. This always tore at my heart.

    Sorry. I'm getting off topic a bit.

    Dog ownership is simply too easy. Any one with a credit card can pick up a pup from a pet shop. It doesn't matter how ignorant they are, all they need is the money to make their purchase.

    If only we could educate people BEFORE they buy a dog.

  4. #14
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    DH - great thread. The judgemental are rife and are killing the spirit of helping those in need.

    There are rescuers who feel I am doing the wrong thing by taking in surrenders and refusing to codemn those who come to me with Pugs to surrender.

    But how can I condemn the woman, standing in front of me, with her Pug that she has had since he was a baby and with tears streaming down her face. She didn't purchase him with the intent to surrender him a few years down the track. She loved him and cared for him. Now, with children in tow, her marriage in ruins, she can not hold it all together. Her life has changed.

    The people that surrender their Pugs, regardless of why, have at least googled or spoken about their plight otherwise they would never have heard of Pug Rescue Sydney. Surely that shows that they care? They have gone out of their way to find someone to help them.

    There are many that phone or email that I can hlep and they can keep their Pugs. There are equally, many that can not keep them in the end.

    People are so harsh on those who need to surrender their pets. Give them options, give them support. We are too quick to condemn.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  5. #15
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    I do not believe that the issue is pet shops either. I keep detailed records of all my surrenders, the majority are purchased from BYBs or registered breeders, and NOT pet shops.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  6. #16
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    Pugs are easy to re-home.

    Who can resist this gorgeous breed, be they a young pup or an 11 year old grumpy and grey Pug.

    I am yet to take in a Pug that is not wanted by someone, somewhere...and until that someone comes along, they live with me in the Pug Palace.

    I accept Pugs, any age, any colour, any condition.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  7. #17
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    People often say to me that they can't imagine a need for a Pug Rescue..... with more than 50 Pugs coming through in the last 4 years alone, I think that shows that there are a lot of Pugs in need.

    Many of the Pugs that come through are also collected from pounds across NSW.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  8. #18

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    Hi guys, just thought i'd put my 5cents worth
    I get upset when you give advice over and over and it's in one ear and out the other. Some people appreciate help and do their best others ask out of guilt but already made their minds up to get rid of their dogs.
    -I believe that too many people dont give their pups/dogs a chance and don't want to put the work in.
    -Novelty wears off and the dogs not fun anymore.
    -dog's too much work and too expensive
    - dog drops hair, smells, etc etc.
    - it was bought on impulse
    I've heard these comments from dog owners that either got rid of their dogs or made them live outside with no interaction. I understand and sympathize with people with genuine reasons for re-homing but there's a lot of people that treat buying a pup like buying a handbag - once you're sick of it you get rid of it.
    I think that some people would benefit from attending a eg. a short course on how to be a responsible dog owner, where they get informed about costs, training, health, puppy care etc, before they buy their pup.

  9. #19
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    Sadly Pugs are popular and when a breed becomes popular greedy breeders, backyarders and puppy farmers jump on the bandwagon.

    When Anne and I first started with Pugs many long years ago they were not a popular breed. Virtually the only people breeding them were genuine folk who loved their dogs.

    When I first decided I wanted a Pug I joined the Pug Club of Vic., talked to people and learnt as much as I could about the breed. Very few people were breeding blacks in those days. There were only 3 breeders specialising in blacks in Australia, 1 in NSW, 1 in Qld and 1 in SA. I waited nearly a year for my first Pug, a black bitch who came from SA. For 3 years I was the only Victorian showing a black. Waiting lists like this soon deter the fly-by-nighters who want a puppy immediately, often for all the wrong reasons.

    It always makes me sad when a breed becomes popular. This is when those who don't care start churning out puppies for the almighty dollars they can make. The first thing to suffer is health. A good breeder studies pedigrees going back many generations before planning a mating. A good breeder won't breed with any dog that may carry genetic problems. The in-it-for-the-money breeders don't care.

    Before they became popular the average Pug was a healthy, long lived dog. The major problem was eye injuries. There were no slipping patellas in my line. My Pugs usually lived to around 16. The oldest Pug I knew was 23 when he was put to sleep. He was still going for his daily walk with his elderly owner until a few days before the end.

    I worked weekends and school holidays at an animal refuge from 1967 to 1970. During this time we took in only one Pug. I went back to the same refuge in 1974 and worked there as assistant manager for another 8 or so years. During this time we took in no Pugs at all. During the 1980's I managed another animal shelter and the only Pugs we took in were a litter of Pug crosses when a show bitch had an unfortunate accidental mating. I was offered the pups through the Pug club as they knew they would be desexed through the shelter.

    A big difference to the 50 Pugs Anne has dealt with in four years after the breed became over popular.

    Sorry for the long post but I can remember the days when Staffies and Rotties were uncommon breeds virtually unseen in pounds and shelters. Look at the situation now.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by dogsrule View Post
    I have to go to bed shortly...joys of working nights...so I will get back to this thread tomorrow. In the meantime, I'd just like to say that this particular dog, a Pharaoh Hound, I adopted from a shelter 2 years ago. He had been dumped by his breeder. I did research the breed first and then my heart ruled my head and I gave him a home. He is extremely shy and I have never been able to get him to come to me, no matter what I tried. He does come up to strangers. I have never ever treated him badly for him to ignore me and he gets on well with the rest of the pack but really keeps to himself. Anyways, there are other probs about which I will give more detail later. I just feel if he went to a home where there were no other dogs or maybe one dog, he would fit in much better.
    Hi There dogsrule.

    I rescue and re-home, and specialise in Sighthounds. I am pretty full up with Greyhounds at the moment, but am more than happy to try and help out if I can in any way if you're still struggling with your Pharoah. PM me.

    They can be challenging at the best of times.

    In response to the thread in general, I agree mostly. I think many neglect matters could be avoilded if people recognised the point at which they need help or their pet isn't suited to them and were able to speak up without fear of retribution or try and re-home their pet without feeling crucified.

    Sometimes personalities clash - it's unaviodable. Sometimes circumstances change beyond peoples control.

    But I also agree that some people seem to think pets are too disposable anyway. Although they wouldn't usually be the type to approach a rescue group or actively seek help about it - they would prefer the anonymity of a pound surrender.

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