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Thread: Harness for walking?

  1. #21
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    Nov 2010
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    You dont have a dog yet?

    Yes, he changed very suddenly. I guess it was an adolesent thing and he started testing the boundaries for everything and the lead pulling is the only thing we have never got back on track...fully, despite many many attempts and lots of work on it. At the end of the day, we personally have decided we'd rather use a tool to stop him pulling so we can enjoy the walk rather than spend every single walk trying to re-train loose lead walking.

    Dont get me wrong, we do still work on it and sometimes he is really good. But sometimes he isnt and he's a big dog and I am only a reasonably small lady so tools work well here when I don't want to work on it.

    So it's not always about NOT training your dog, but being able to sometimes enjoy doing something with them in between training. I dont want to spend EVERY walk practising coz it really ruins the walk for me, and him LOL

    ETA, he is the only dog weve never been able to perfect this with. Well and Pippi, but (and this is terrible) I never bothered teaching her a loose lead walk. She weighs 6 kilos so I can barely even tell when she is pulling LOL. Plus, she tends to stop every few steps anyway to make sure I am still with her
    Last edited by Lala; 01-13-2012 at 05:22 PM.

  2. #22
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    Nov 2009
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    Lets see...Staffies are NOTORIOUS for pulling...they love it! Mine will pull for about 3 minutes then they stop...too much hard work LOL

    Ours were trained for showing, so they had to walk/run a bit different than with normal obedience training. You also train a show dog to stand before you teach sit

  3. #23
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    Jan 2012
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    There is nothing wrong with a correction chain for a huge breed dog like you have. It's not cruel if you use it properly I use it on a lot of dogs and it's very effective. The rope chokers are literally that - high up on the neck and apply pressure to the trachea with the dog starts getting wound up and it's NOT for use without trainer supervision. A correction chain should always sit totally loose around the dogs neck, if it's about to pull or arc up you give the leash a very quick sharp tug. It's almost a flick motion. That fast sensation to the neck is an interruption to the dogs though process and you immediately then call them back to show them what you want them to do or walk them away.

    Harnesses ... start down that road and you'll be pulled off your feet in no time. Considering you are working on either a lever principle or strength, if the dog out-muscles you, you'll fly. Considering her size and breed you need more then just a puppy preschool - in the scheme of things they do very little. What cross is she to be that big at 3 months of age? That sounds extremely oversized for a cross.

  4. #24
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    I personally like the front attach harness that attaches on the dog's chest and gives you leverage like a wheelbarrow has a pivot point leverage that lets you work with more load than you normally could. A similar effect can be gained by looping the lead around a pole - you get leverage (like a pully) and a bit of added friction.

    But Nekhbet is right - your dog will be huge and if it doesn't have perfect manners in all situations - a front attach harness will not save you. But a rotti owner did manage to go from not being able to walk her dog, to being able to roll a smoke while holding the lead from the use of the front attach harness.

    With the choke chain or front attach harness or any of the head halters - you want to keep the lead very short - so the dog cannot build any momemtum in a lunge. Ie if the dog can move an inch before you stop it, that's much easier than if the dog runs 2 metres and gets some speed up and you try to stop it. And there is corresponding severe impact on the dog's neck and head and nose bridge if it comes to a sudden stop from high speed.

    Personally - I hate the choke chains. I feel prong collars (with flat tipped prongs) are better for the dog than choke collars - because there is a limit to the amount of pressure that can be applied with a prong (and also the limited slip aka martingale collar) where as the choke collar has no limit to how tight it can get and some dogs have been killed with those.

    I also think your average amateur dog club may not be up to the training needs of a huge dog and a professional - if you can afford it would be good. But even going to the amateur clubs (initially without your dog) and trying reward based methods at home will help. Avoid any clubs that focus on yank and crank with a choke chain - because it could make your dog much worse. Ie you can really stuff a dog up with punishment based methods, but reward based methods done well work well and done badly are usually easy to retrain. Easier than the trauma caused by badly timed punishment.

  5. #25
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    I actually think all equipment be it front attaching harnesses , check chain, halti's or such can all work for large to giant dogs........i do have plenty of experience as i do newfie rescue, maremma's and other giants. but all equipment needs to be used correctly. A check chain on a large to giant dog can be just as ineffective as any piece of equipment. i have seen many people towed along by their newfies on a check-chain, newfie still managing to tow them along quite happily ( hooray for a strong muscular neck like so many mastiff breeds have). The correct use of the check -chain and the dog will instantly "give" to it and be soft. Pieces of equipment with correct education on how to use them can be an asset. Basic training in a controlled environment comes first.
    Just using off lead in a safe area and teaching the dog to heel with positive reinforcement might also help and increasing distractions per sessions. Personally I have re-trained quite a few very large giants with the front attaching harness (NEVER rear attaching except in tracking) and positive reinforcement training only. I have found halti's and Check-chains also useful, but sometimes teaching people timing and correct use of a check-chain can be quite difficult. I think training with a capable trainer will probably be the best option for handler and dog.

    Teaching a dog from puppy on how to loose lead walk with positive reinforcement would be the simplest of all
    Pets are forever

  6. #26
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    Dec 2011
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    Thanks for all your advice guys
    She is x Dane and I will be getting her into more training as soon as I can been pretty busy here last few weeks, I really like the sound of the off leash approach she's still very young and she's normally so well behaved I think she will pick it up quickly

  7. #27
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    I posted some pics of her on here earlier she is big dog for her age that's why I'm so concerned about doing everything right and getting her under control before she's fully grown!!

  8. #28

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    Liss my girl that is a dyed in the wool puller (nothing exists for her but the possibility of rabbits...) goes perfectly on an Infin8 collar from Blackdog. She's bloody strong, and not that bright... We call her our dumb blonde... and doesn't respond well to correction.

    She has improved in it over time so that now she wears it at the start of walks, and I can take it off and put her lead onto her normal martingale collar after she starts getting a bit tired - normally after her off lead gallop.

    I've also found with the younger ones, who are a bit brighter... that if they go through a stage of pulling they can wear it a few times and the pulling will stop. It has been a fantastic training aid. And this coming from me - who used to think headcollars were ridiculous on dogs...

  9. #29
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    Aug 2011
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    Liss, I haven't done it enough to really enforce it, but my dog loves heel training. I used to do the training in the same spots on our walk for a while and she liked it so much she would heel without me telling her to when we got to one of the spots. I use microwaved lambs fry cut into little cubes for this type of training and it is a great way to keep my dog's attention.

  10. #30
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    Actually the way I train with a correction chain is to allow the dog free lead. The dog can have the entire lead, I give it the option to choose to run off (which will give it a correction) or come stay next to me and get heaps of wonderful treats and pats. You cannot use a chain effectively on a short leash. That is not the point of it and hence why they end up 'choking' the dog, not what they were even invented for anyway. Rope 'chokers' are made to apply pressure on the trachea and arteries running into the head of the dog, hence why they are only for professional use and only when the situation warrants it.

    The way the chain works is a slack leash is giving the dog a pop correction. You can get a decent correction with a longer leash, a very short leash wont apply the proper correction hence you have to try more often (ever seen those people who walk and pop pop pop pop pop down the street?) You give the dog one decent correction when it bolts out, call it back to you, and keep rewarding the dog for maintaining the proper position. As I said I have seen a lot of people out muscled by big dogs because there is no repercussion to them applying pressure on their harnesses or headcollars. If you have a more sensitive breed who cares about their eyes/bridge of nose rubbed, or armpits constricted it will work. Then again do we find that these bits and bobs work because owners have also changed their own habits with the dog and are trying harder?

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