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Thread: Advice on buying a dog - Labradoodle?

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Australia
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    Gorgeous pics! I love poodles too one of the most intelligent breeds of dogs and love their coats.. Great dogs )

  2. #42
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    Jan 2012
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    Armidale, NSW
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    Just anothet question about Poodles, if that's okay. I"ve read that minature poodles are 28 -38cm and Standards are 38+ (and often 50+) but if I want a dog around 40 - 45cm what should I look for, a minature and hope he ends up at the top of his size group, or look for a small standard sized one?

    I like the idea.of getting an RSPCA puppy, but is this a good idea? If you can't meet the parents or know his breeding isn't there a decent chance he may have hereditary problems, or have an unpredictable temperment or row to a very unexpected size?

  3. #43

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    It is true that you really don't know what you are getting with a rescue, while it's an admirable thing to do, it isn't for everyone.

    One of my poodles is 13 inches at the shoulder, the other is 16 inches. In Australia we only have the 3 sizes and you want a breeder who tries to breed as close as they can to the height restrictions. In places like Sweden they have an extra sizing in between Miniature and Standard.
    You can have a talk to standard breeders and tell them you really like both the mini and the standard but you were hoping for a size semewhere in between. So you either want a big mini, or a small standard. My boy is actually over height at 16 inches, we could tell he was going to be a big boy even when he was a pup so the breeder should be able to have a rough idea of final height.

  4. #44
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    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    You can indeed not predict if a rescue dog my have hereditary problems. But if you get a dog from a rescue organisation, you can get a pretty good idea of their temperament as these dogs are fostered by families so they get to know them very well. As for size... I think you can usually make a guess at how big a pup will grow by looking at its size and the size of its paws.

    The other option is to get a slightly older dog. That is what I've done. Banjo was about 8 months old when I got her. From the size of her paws - which were by then in proportion with the rest of her body - I was fairly sure she would not grow much bigger and she hasn't.

    I'm not a big fan personally of adopting directly from the pound or the RSPCA - bit sad, I know - because I just want more information about the dog I'm going to adopt than they can usually give me. I have done it with my previous dog though and never regretted it as I loved her to bits. In hindsight she was not exactly the ideal dog for an inexperienced dog owner like me though.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Rural Western Australia
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    Yes it is hard to know about the genetic diseases in a rescue. I have a rescue Koolie and he was 7 months old. He had a very nice conformation and Koolies are reletively free of major problems so I took a chance. I also insured him just in case although you need to check that the inurer covers genetic diseases.

    I did have a friend resue a cattle dog puppy and she also insured her which was lucky because she had extreme elbow dysplasia which didnt manifest untill the dog was 18 months old. She required two lots of surgery which cost thousands.

    My mum rescued a cattle dog of unknown parentage and she was very straight in the stifle, which was clear at the time. The dog eventually had both cruciates go which was probably not unexpected given her conformation and the fact she loved to jump for a ball.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 01-10-2012 at 03:26 PM.

  6. #46
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    Jun 2011
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    Sydney
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    I'm very glad you seem to have settled on either a poodle or a lab, (looking like poodle), I can tell you from experience, as I've just done 7 days straight at the boarding kennels washing a lot of Poodle X's after the busy Xmas/NY period and their coats are a nightmare.

    We've also had in a lot of poodles and a lot of labs. The Labs are lovely when given good training and an active lifestyle, though we always have a couple of really calm ones too that seem to go against the grain of the active, boisterous ones. But if I was to choose between an untrained Lab or an untrained Poodle, I'd pick the poodle, though not saying you don't plan on training your dog well.

    I think provided you are not too fussed on the sex of your pup & are prepared to wait you may as Crested has said be able to find either a larger mini or smaller standard if you contact a few breeders. But remember essentially you are after a dog to fit your lifestyle, so look at the temperament of the breed, it's exercise requirements, how much training it would require and if you can match these you will be most happy. The largest dog in my household is my most laid back, though I understand that you want to be able to fit the dog in the car so would probably err on the side of the mini.

    All the best with your search, exciting times ahead.

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