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Thread: Temperament testing

  1. #11
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    I think that sometimes the foster carers are inexperienced. I once lived in a regional town where a small group of women started a rescue to try and stem the tide of dogs being euthanaised in the local pounds.

    They were dog owners themselves but were deperate for foster homes as this limited the dogs they could rescue, particularly as many experienced dog owners had a full complement of their own dogs. They often just took who they could get.

    They mainly rescued the dogs that were not working breeds as they just found that these dogs often needed far more than their foster carers could provide, were difficult to rehome and were often returned due to their propensity to jump and escape.

  2. #12
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    I can imagine it's so hard... i mean, you want to find as many placements as you can to give the dog a chance and to make room for more BUT the number of people that come along who are really qualified or very experienced in managing particular breeds or behaviour issues would be slim.

  3. #13
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    The trouble with fostering problem dogs is that you have to do so much training and spend so much time, that you become attached to the dogs and become a Foster failure. Because you get to like the dogs and again, no one is good enough for the dog you fixed..........LOL, speaking from personal experience.

    There are some dogs that just need temp testing and see how they behave in certain environments........A little basic Obedience and pass them on, but it is still hard. Emotions are hard to deal with. And because so many people say so many good things, but really do not follow through. They sound like perfect owners and then you meet them again later with the dog and I take my hat of to people who keep working in Rescue, I found it too heart-breaking, so now I have gone to Newf Rescue only and just training people who already have their dogs
    Pets are forever

  4. #14
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    That's why I wish I lived closer to Banjo's foster family. I would love to meet up with them and show them how well Banjo is doing.

  5. #15

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    Hi All
    I find this topic very interesting. The local rescue group in Canberra which does temperament testing at the pound places a lot of emphasis on whether a dog jumps up or not. If a dog jumps up they consider it unsuitable for children. From my experience most dogs jump up when they are excited or want to be friendly. It is usually because they want to get closer to your face so they can lick. These dogs would not jump up on children because a child is already at face level. I have never minded dogs jumping up on me but since reading rescue sites I am afraid now that if my very friendly dogs were ever assessed via one of these temperament tests they would fail dismally. I have seen so many happy friendly dogs jumping up on their owners and having a game. It concerns me that these dogs would not be rescued if they found themselves at a pound.

  6. #16
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    I have seen how they temp test in Canberra and it is how they were taught. I think they just have to set limitations. Somewhere they have to set limits. I think if the only thing a dog did wrong was jump, it would still stand a good chance. It is only part of the whole thing. Jumping can be easily re-taught to not jumping or jumping on command only, which is what I do. It also has its benefits. but to make some thing work like this, they have to choose a system, which they can average out and follow. each individual thing has probably got something wrong with it for every dog........I think they are hoping to average it out
    Pets are forever

  7. #17

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    I've said the same thing so many times - testing is so generic. Like Beloz said, dogs aren't dumb and a doll is not a human. I need an eyerolling emoticon for that little test.

    My least favourite however is the "guided sit" that some groups seem to love. Greyhounds can't sit.

    Having had numerous greyhound fosters, and knowing the breed type - it is a very, very rare greyhound that has the ability to sit. If they can sit at all they are usually acutely uncomfortable doing it. It's to do with their physical build, and their upbringing in kennels where they never learn it as a youngster.

    I've also seen various sighthounds described (in a negative way) as "too aloof" or similar. And sadly sometimes passed over for rescue.

    Well duh. Shih tzus and Lhasa Apsos are other "aloof" breeds. They're supposed to be, they shouldn't be penalised for it. Aloof with strangers is not a true indicator of temperament at all.

    Breed is rarely, if ever taken into account. Unless it is breed specific rescue or course.

  8. #18

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    Testing for friendliness to children by using a doll is bizarre. Do you really think a dog does not know the difference? As for the guided sit and drop some dogs drop front legs first and find it difficult to do this from a sit. I have a mixed breed dog here that I found it very difficult to teach to drop until I worked it out that he goes down front legs first. I agree that anatomically some dogs do have problems with both sitting and dropping and some dogs seem aloof but it's in their breed. I also have problems with confining a dog for days and then asking it to pass a test which could determine whether it lives or dies. I have an obedience titled dog that always before she goes into the ring does a few laps of the ground to take the edge of her eenergy levels. She would not pass a temperament test.

  9. #19
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    I must say that from what I hear dogs here in Canberra will only fail this test if they clearly show aggression. Not for being boisterous or seemingly unresponsive. I even saw a dog on the local rescue's FB page recently that tried to snap at the handler's hand during the test. The dog's still there and they are trying to find an experienced owner who can lower the dog's obvious high stress levels.

    Also, the rescue's test results for the dogs in the pound are used for guidance only. As far as I know, the pound does not have a system to match the right dog to the right owner like the RSPCA has. You can go there and walk out with a dog within the hour.

    The jumping up and kids thing... There's jumping and jumping. My dog has quite a stocky build and gets quite out of control when she gets excited. When she used to jump up to my 6yo, she did often hurt her by scratching with nails or teeth. She is also very capable of pushing a toddler over from pure excitement. She actually did that once. I had taught my old dog not to jump and thought it would be easy to fix, but it was much, much harder than I had expected. We're still not totally there, but I did do lots of works with her around kids and she is now good with them. But I had to educate myself quite a bit on training before I managed to achieve that. And if she would have not been such a great dog otherwise, I would have hesitated to tackle the jumping issue.

  10. #20
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    If the testing is done properly it is not the fact that they are able to sit/drop, but more what their reaction to a guided sit/drop is. It is OK for them to fail miserably, it just tells the person how they react to handling. Many people who do this temp testing do not have that much experience with dogs and are volunteers. And some to the testing by ticking off the set things to do....this is just a something to give them a guideline i think. Somewhere to start. Rescue is so hard, because there are so many dogs and so few volunteers. Which makes it sad.
    There are not enough people with dog experience (training and breed knowledge) in the general Rescue.

    I think the doll is its biggest failure.....As I said before some really good dogs just hate that big piece of plastic or are rough with it, but again, not many want to test on kids
    Pets are forever

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