Page 6 of 29 FirstFirst ... 4567816 ... LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 290

Thread: 'Oodles' 'Schnoos' 'Aliers' and 'Poos'

  1. #51

    Default

    As I said I'm not against mixed breed dogs, it depends on the circumstances. Working dogs are a prime example, farmers breed the best 'workers' together and breed doesn't come into it. But with pets there are more morons who have no idea about breeding and what disasters crossing certain breeds can have.

    We have already established that there are both good and bad purebred breeders. Show me some good mixed breed breeders and I'll be on their side too.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    I have been trying to argue all along that there is no reason why there couldn't be good mixed breed breeders. It is a sad fact that there seem to be so very few at the moment. But we are not going to encourage any breeder to lift their game by just telling them they should not be breeding. Just like we are not going to achieve anything by telling people who have their mind set on one of those designer crosses that they are idiots and should not get one.

    We need rules and regulations in place and we need to educate people about what responsible breeding is - regardless of what breed or crossbreed it is - and get people to put pressure on breeders to improve their practices. This is not just going to go away because a bunch of people think it's a bad idea and an immoral industry. I'm trying to get something constructive out of this. How can we improve the breeding practices for these popular crosses?

  3. #53

    Default

    Well i had to wait until my breeder had families lined up, ive been
    Ooking for several months. She had her mum cavs resting, so had to wait until one could be mated. And it is costing me $750. In all my tesearch the most expensive i have seen was on the groodle website i posted at $1300. Sadly my breeder is mixing some other combinations too, so whilst i am happy my puppy is well. Ared for and its parents are cared for, there does seem to be some experimenting going on, which leads me to think there was either an accident, or she is testing out the market.

    I think cross breeders should be registered as such.

    Genuine question: why arent dog breeders inspected inorder to be licenced? Im sure there are a tonne of people who would be interested in helping out so it cannot simply be that there is noone to do the inspecting?

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    But they really are all experiments, these crossbreeds, so I don't see why one cross would be better or worse than another? I think that's ok because all breeds started as an experiment at some stage anyway.

    But I agree with the licensing and attaching conditions to obtaining one.
    Last edited by Beloz; 12-16-2011 at 08:03 PM.

  5. #55

    Default

    The thing is, the original reason for crossing was to try and develop certain traits, have a sniffer dog who isn't quite catching the scent as well as it should, well breed it to a dog with bigger ears to better trap the scent, keep crossing and refining until you have what you want and then continue breeding to that standard.

    I don't see the point in crossing breeds just for a cute name when you have no intention of refining them as a breed. Too many "one off" dogs with crosses for them to be labelled with a name.

  6. #56

    Default

    As an ex breeder of a cross breed, I can give personal insight.
    I was involved in the breeding of Aussie bulldogs. They aren't a recognised breed as yet, but the breeders do have a goal and are working on regulations etc to get the recognition.
    The problem they face at the moment which is prevent their goals from being reached, if that there are 3 bodies working against eachother. They are the ABS, UABA and ABCA.
    One is breeding from a certain lineage which comes from a mix of Boxers, American bulldogs, and British. The head of the "club" has to approve the breeding program and they also keep the best of the best for themselves, and they don't give papers to litters outside of their program. This means that the breed is too limited. The other 2 bodies work on percentages of British Bulldog. One body believes the higher the percentage of BBD the better, but the other one believes anything over 80% is too much. This means that the breed is still totally inconsistent. There are no set traits of an Aussie bulldog, because the 3 bodies are working on 3 different types of the breed. When you go to an Aussie bulldog "get together fun day" you will see a heap of dogs which look like all different breeds. Some are tall and slender like an American or boxer, some are short and stocky like a British and some are somewhere in between. The temperaments vary according to the club and program also. Anyway, it wasn't until I was full involved and had a pregnant bitch that I realised just how messy starting a new breed is. Unless it's done properly, it just remains a breeding program of crosses.
    With all the different breeders of oodles and the like around, it would be virtually impossible to start a consistent program, no matter how good the intentions. There needs to be at the very least, a list of desired traits when starting a new breed.. not just a mix of 2 breeds. The traits which are undesirable could take around 4 generations to breed out. It's very expensive and time consuming to start a new breed and most breeders of crosses aren't in it for the breed.. they are in it for the dollars.

    I hope that all made sense.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Good post, Pugger. And I get where you are coming from.

    But I think the expectations people looking for a designer crossbreed have are generally a lot lower than those of the kind of people you mention in your post. The breed enthusiasts if that's what you could call them. Basically these people are just looking for an ideal family dog, I think.

    There are probably things that would be worth standardising. Obviously the whole hypo-allergenic and non-shedding trait is just false advertising. And should be exposed as such. Which may prompt some breeders at least to try and breed for that. Not that I agree with focusing on something as fickle as not shedding - if you want a dog, you should be able to put up with some hair in the house, I reckon, but anywho. The hypo-allergenic thing would be useful if it can be achieved.

    But for the rest, I think most of these people just want a dog that can be easily trained, doesn't require too much exercise and likes people. And it would be interesting to know how much variation there is in those types of traits with the current designer crosses out there now. As for the dogs' appearance... Yes, people probably often choose them because they think they look cute. Cuter than other breeds they know. It doesn't have to make sense, it's just personal taste. And if you're going to get a dog for the kids to grow up with, cute is an advantage.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Apuppyforme

    There is a big difference between a responsible breeder and an ANKC registered breeder. Some ANKC registered breeders are responsible and some are not. And some responsible breeders are not ANKC registered. This is especially likely where the ANKC breed standard calls for an unhealthy dog. There's still a few of those. There are also breeders "registered" with their local council, and their only requirement is not to upset the neighbours. And if it's rural or feral enough - then the neighbours don't notice or care.

    Responsible breeder.
    Does the tests for genetic (hereditary) diseases before deciding which dogs to pair up. Avoids pairing up dogs with the same genetic diseases.

    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    Cattle farmers also select for heathy cattle that are good do-ers (don't need much feed and don't get injured easily) and score well in whatever purpose they're bred for, ie produce calves that produce a lot of milk or meat. And cattle farmers will not put the bull in with the the cows unless they're fairly sure they have a market for the calves and have sufficient feed to raise them. Cattle farmers do not usually select on appearance alone or ahead of health.

    Puppy farmers only select for cute puppies. And some ANKC registered breeders also do this. Ie select for blue staffies because so many people want them - despite the skin and general health problems these dogs are prone to, not to mention not meeting the breed standard for Staffordshire Bull Terriers.

    So annual health checks on the parent dogs - will not tell you if you're going to be up for huge vet bills trying to sort out problems like hip displasia or you get a blind dog eg PRA.

    There is also a limit on how many litters are allowed per bitch for ANKC registered breeders. Ie not more often than every 18 months and not more than 6 litters in a life time.

    Australian National Kennel Council

    The code of ethics is not followed by all ANKC breeders and it is not enforced (so far as I know) by the ANKC. It's up to the buyers to check the breeder complies. But the code of ethics are a good guideline (best pirate voice: "guidelines arrrggghh") for what should be happening.

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    I know that several Search and Rescue groups are breeding my cross breed (Golden Retriever x Border Collie) and using them for Search and Rescue. It has been a very successful cross breed and is done buy them purely for a purpose.

    Having trained Tessa and worked with some others too, I can full understand why they would cross these two. I have also seen that they are a very definite "looking" dog. most look like an almost flatcoated retriever. And if you look into their history you can see why.

    I have "spoken" with some Search and Rescue people on Forums and they tell me they like the cross better compared to either pure breed. The BC, gives the GR the stamina it requires.

    I quite agree with cross breeding for a purpose (working), that is how all pure breeds started


    I know that when we cross breed cattle, we do it for the purpose of cross-breed vigour and we expect the calfs to grow bigger. We only ever use our Hereford bull over the Angus cows (first cross). And never do a second cross of Hereford bull to Angus/hereford cows. Because the outcome are often smaller. We call this hybrid vigour in the cattle world...Not sure if that is the reason why some poodle crosses are so large.
    But surely there is a breed out there that meets the same characteristics as a BC x retreiver and would be just as good for search and rescue??????????????

    Just chucking that out there, I think it is an invalid argument but it is in the first post of this thread....

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    Breeding a dog for work is one thing, breeding a dog as a pet, well we've already got many of those in all shapes and sizes for people to choose from and choosing a dog based on it's cuteness is wrong. I've never owned a dog in my life based on cuteness or a look even though I aspire to the highest level in the show ring, the outside appearance in so far as equal marking or a pretty colour do not come in to it for me.

    If you aren't fussed on what traits your oodle bears most resemblance to then why not a shelter?

    The things I hate about the oodle coat is that it works against itself and many many pet owners of them spend a fortune on grooming. It is not an easier coat than the poodles and most groomers will tell you exactly that.

    I just don't get it, if you like the poodle get one, if you like the Cav get one, if you like the Maltese get one, etc and if you don't mind the mix then go to the shelter and get a puppy. I can give anyone who is interested the name of a Sydney shelter from which unfortunately you will be able to get an ooodle mix, maybe not today but certainly in the near very near future.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •