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Thread: 'Oodles' 'Schnoos' 'Aliers' and 'Poos'

  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    I agree with your last paragraph.

    Not sure I agree necessarily about farmers or working dog breeders necessarily pondering their breedings with lots of thought....I am pretty sure some just cross a really good dog, with another really good dog LOL...well not pretty sure, I know of some who do exactly just do that...oddly enough they usually get really good working pups from the cross but obviously not always.
    Yes farmers do just cross dogs and there are some good dogs produced and a lot of not so good pups produced - good dogs for agility etc but not so good for working.

    Farmers often know their dogs and what they want and probably really know the lines although it may just appear they cross at random. I know quite a few farmers who know their dogs and their lines. They often talk to me about them. Certainly the breeder/farmers I know are pretty conversant. I know a couple that get semen fro the UK as well to strengthen certain traits in their dogs. Sometimes helpful, sometimes not. If you cross 2 really good proven dogs you increase your chances of good offspring of course. The breeding is planned with the expectation of good dogs.

    Some dont of course put too much thought into it and that is obvious in the many poor quality working dogs that are produced. Heavy selection pressure with a bullet is often the end result.

    There is often a very heavy selection pressure - I know so many working dogs given away or shot, because they are more of a hindrance than a help, you also see them in the pounds. I have 2 give aways myself to save one from the bullet and one from suburbia and all the training in the world is not going to make them into as a good a dog as my BC, who needs much less training and is a far better dog because he comes from a breeder and stockman who puts a lot of thought into it My neighbour just shot one of his dogs the other day from his own breeding of "good dogs" because it wasnt up to scratch.

    There are way too many poor quality working dog produced that end up in not so good circumstances as has been touched on here. In fact the pounds are overflowing with them.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 12-29-2011 at 08:09 PM.

  2. #202
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    Bit OT, but I do wonder where all those working dogs in suburban pounds come from. Surely they weren't all saved from farms because they weren't up to scratch as working dogs? Wouldn't it also be because they just happen to be popular as pets - probably because they are such Australian icons maybe? - which in turn increases the risk of accidental breeding and then inexperienced owners cannot cope with them? And I do meet lots of happy working dogs - usually crosses - in the suburbs too, I must add. Most of them are rescues and their owners seem truly committed to meeting their needs. But obviously - from their over-representation in the shelters - they must be the exceptions, sadly enough. But there are just lots of sad, unhappy dogs in the suburbs full stop.

  3. #203
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    My father in law bred his own litter of working dogs every 10 years or so, mating to another farmer's dog that had some traits he wanted. All the other pups also found good homes to local farmers as he had a name for producing good working dogs even if it was only once in a blue moon, all free.. He kept one. He doesn't breed anymore and Pretty was the only bitch in 40 or more years that he failed to segregate as she had a split first season. He segregated for the first half of it but due to his own problems missed the second. Sire was his own pedigreed stumpy tail ACD and Pretty an acd x border collie.
    He never desexed any and but did a good job segregating till now.
    My beloved Shadow was the runt of his last intentional litter bred 16 years ago. (RIP aged 14} Last time he ever intentionally bred.

    Pretty is the bitch that I stole from him when she was 2 weeks off giving birth after saying no more dogs when I saw she was in pup ( I loved her and coveted her the moment I met her a few months beforehand and she is responsible for for giving me the pups that are now 2 years old that have been a lifesaver to me during chemo and radiation and who are in my siggy. I don't give a shit about pure vs cross breeds in his situation but I don't like oodles, poos crosses just bred for fashion and money.
    Last edited by Di_dee1; 12-29-2011 at 11:20 PM.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  4. #204
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    oodles, poos crosses just bred for fashion and money.
    fashion and money

    You hit the nail right on the head.

  5. #205

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    i have a groodle and he came from a breeder who owns both parents and doesn't own a puppy farm. she bred for the love of her breed. my dog is scarily like my child. i love him so much. he is just perfect. he has the intelligence of a poodle and the loyalty of a golden retriever. However, he also has the 'anxiety' of a poodle. he is typically highly strung like a poodle. we had no idea for certain what he would turn out like but i'd never give him up for another dog. He's worth a million dollars to me. With a dog bred for a specific characteristic or trait, i think its always a gamble. just love what you have.

  6. #206

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    What on Earth is a groodle?

  7. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by puggerup View Post
    What on Earth is a groodle?
    hate to think.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  8. #208
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Bit OT, but I do wonder where all those working dogs in suburban pounds come from. Surely they weren't all saved from farms because they weren't up to scratch as working dogs? Wouldn't it also be because they just happen to be popular as pets - probably because they are such Australian icons maybe? - which in turn increases the risk of accidental breeding and then inexperienced owners cannot cope with them? And I do meet lots of happy working dogs - usually crosses - in the suburbs too, I must add. Most of them are rescues and their owners seem truly committed to meeting their needs. But obviously - from their over-representation in the shelters - they must be the exceptions, sadly enough. But there are just lots of sad, unhappy dogs in the suburbs full stop.
    In my experience when I lived in a regional town, many kelpies came from farms. Farmer would have a litter and keep what he wanted and sell the rest. Then people in suburbia would sometimes breed these dogs with some really terrible results at times - I knew someone who had a kelpie litter and the whole litter had apalling temperaments. The parents were both highly strung fearful dogs, both off farms.

    Some farmers knowing that pet shops would take these pups would sometimes send them the pups they didnt want. A friend of mine got his huntaway kelpie cross and kelpie from the pet shop, both came off farms.

    Some working breeders will sell pups that are not shaping up or are too excitable to agility homes which often works out well.

    My koolie comes from rescue - he and his brother were bought off farm by a couple who liked his pretty merle colour - they got him from an ad in the elders weekly I think. He was to much for them and at 5 months he and his brother were surrendered and I picked him up for agility. My kelpie is a dog who was not shaping up on sheep so again I took her as an agility prospect.

    So I think they come from a number of sources, but quite a few come off farms.

    Farmers who know their dogs will often get a good name for good dogs, they generally are good stockmen and if they dont have papers for their dogs, they sure know where they came from and how to breed them. Breeding only proven, healthy workers with the right traits is usually good enough in many cases. Good stockmen understand their dogs and the traits they want. I would suspect these dogs mainly find good working homes.

    Quite a few farmers shoot the dogs they dont want because they dont believe they would make good pets and dont want them going into suburbia.

    Border collies will often come off farms originally and then people in suburbia will breed them. In my regional town there were quite a few BYB of various working dogs for the suburban market. Again breeding for a fashion as a lot of people in regional towns fancy working breed dogs. Many came to the pound and were often euthanaised because they were hard to find a suitable home for. A few of my friends had these types of dogs and they do well with the right person.

    I think just the fact there are so many dogs euthanaised and in pounds or rescue at any one time is telling us that something is wrong with the whole system we have regarding dogs and their breeding.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 12-29-2011 at 11:29 PM.

  9. #209

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    A groodle is a poodle x golden retriever

  10. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by Di_dee1 View Post
    I don't like oodles, poos crosses just bred for fashion and money.
    That statement is about as fair as 'I don't like bull breeds just bred for insecure would like machos'

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