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Thread: 'Oodles' 'Schnoos' 'Aliers' and 'Poos'

  1. #171

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    Ugh ipad driving me nuts. Nattylou i like the colouring, the wavy or curly coat, the cuteness of the face, they stay puppyish and look like a teddy. A cavoodle is bigger than a fwd, and wont get as dirty as a white dog. I dont want a terrier.

    Two other purebred dogs that i like are the puli, and polish lowland sheepdog. I guess this indicates i like querky dogs.

    I also would never buy a poodle crossed with a short haired dog. You are right labradoodles often look freakish and gangly and the coat does look wiry and yuck.

    I just want to let everybody know here that i spent ages finding a decent breeder for my puppy. I could have gone down to pets paradise and bought 100 cavoodles whilst i waited for mine to be ready. I waited so that i can walk my dog with my head held high knowing where it came from, who the parents were and knowing that my dogs mum isnt rotting somewhere like a battery hen. This thread and peoples name calling have now made it so that i dont feel welcome to come back and ask questons about my puppy! If i have the slightest bit of trouble you will just all say i told u so, it wouldnt have happened if u bought a purebred. This forum is described as for purebreeds and cross breeds. Which is why i didnt go to dogzonline.

  2. #172
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    You dont need to leave apuppyforme. there are plenty of us who wont say "I told you so".

    I think if you have researched where your dog came from and found a responsible breeder of your chosen cross then you have done the right thing and good on you.

  3. #173

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    Thanks lala.

    Natty i just went through 300 small dogs on petrescue. 2 were part cavalier. One was crossed with what looked like a pomeranian, and the other a jack russell.

    Most of the dogs were maltese crosses. The maltese recently made it to the top 20 dangerous dog list, which was put together based on dog bite statistics frompeople presenting to the hospital for treatment. I cannot risk a breed that is known to be tempramental and snappy with a toddler who plays on the floor.

    The other reason behind my choice, is a cavalier comes up in the top ten family dogs, and when i do the select a pet quizzes. I dont like the look of their ears , but when crossed with a poodle it seems to shorten the ears.

    I wonder about the stats of dd. ie how many moodles are bought compared to say a cavoodle or groodle? Do they sell better as they are smaller in the petshop window? As they are impulse bought do you think they get pregnant before the owner gets time to desex? Or are they dumped because the maltese in them makes them more likely to yap if understimulated? Whereas a cavoodle might sleep or pine, or a groodle might dig? The pining and the digging dont piss off the neighbours so might last longer?

  4. #174
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    Jan 2011
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    SA
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    Petrescue SA: 61 hits. 1 oodle. 4 Maltese crosses. The rest are mostly bull- and workingbreed X's.

    And I found one amazing looking rottyX girl... Have to show her to the OH

  5. #175
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Rural Western Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    Do you also apply that question to people who cross breed working dogs natty?

    Or just oodles?

    IMO, its one or the other...you either can x breed, or you cant...it shouldnt matter if its working or companian.
    You know I think the same applies. Working dogs are not an excuse to crossbreed or breed indiscriminantly for that matter. There are poorly bred crossbred and purebred working dogs out there. The aim of a cross in a working breed is to fix desirable traits. In fact the aim of any mating is to fix desirable traits. Only people with good knowledge of these traits and the lines that carry them trully understand how to do this to best effect on a continuous basis and have more good pups than bad. Calmness is an extremely desirable trait in a working dog, dogs without this are an extreme pain in the butt in any home, except perhaps agility LOL

    A lot of working dogs without the combination of traits to make them truly useful as working farm dogs end up in suburban homes sometimes with diasterous consequences for the dog. Or they are shot.

    Good thoughtfull breeding would really reduce this. A working dog is only useful if it can truly work. I have 3 and they can all work but only one is truly a good dog and when you look at the lines behind him you know why. My other 2 are rescues from farmers who didnt want them and it is also obvious why and their breeding was not well planned. One I ended up rescuing from a suburban home he ended up in.

    I do agility with them and they live on my farm.

    There is way too much indiscriminant breeding of dogs in general I believe. What you see in rescue is only one aspect. What goes through the specialist vets or are euthaniased by their owners is another.

    Crossbred, purebred I dont care. What I care about is the demonstrated knowledge of the breeder in producing the best healthiest dogs possible for the situation. This requires real knowledge of genetics and if the breeder doesnt have it, run a mile is all I can say.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 12-29-2011 at 12:26 PM.

  6. #176
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    I absolutely agree with that 100% Kala.

    Th eonly reason I mention working dogs is due to the question being posed about "oodles" of "What characteristics cant they find in a purebred"...and really the exact same thing applies when xing workers. Why couldnt they find the characteristics they want in a pure worker?

    I am fine with breeding, whether it be pure or cross as long as due diligence and care is taken in providing sound dogs. I just think a lot of the arguments the pro pure people use, can be applied right back to purebreds, i.e. "instead of getting a dd, get a shelter dog", "breeding of dd's contributes to shelter dogs not getting homes" etc etc...replace dd with "pure" and the argument still applies.

  7. #177
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    I don't know where on earth you get your data from but the most common dogs in shelters and rescue are staffies, working dogs and apparently Maltese (the latter in QLD apparently, not down here) - and from the age of the vast majority of these dogs - between 10 months and 2 years - it is quite easy to deduct that most of them are surrendered because of inexperienced owners underestimating their exercise requirements and being unable to deal with them escaping their yard and/or being aggressive to other dogs or even humans. Most of those dogs - except the Maltese perhaps - have a low maintenance coat. In fact, I cannot think of a coat easier to maintain than a staffy's or a BC/kelpie/ACD.

    So your argument that the oodles are more likely to be dumped if their coat doesn't turn out the way they expect seems based on nothing. And very much from the angle of someone choosing a purebred because of their predictability. Nothing wrong with that from where I stand, but I cannot relate to it and I'm sure lots of other people can't either.

    The health issue is also a mute point because as Lala pointed out, no one here is arguing about health checks and ethical breeding being optional. That also covers the impulse buying issue.

    It is just mind-boggling that the anti-oodle brigade refuses to focus on the important issues to ensure the well-being of ALL dogs regardless of their genetic heritage. We need to ban pups being sold in pet stores, we need to regulate the breeding of all dogs and make breeders adher to a code or practice that ensures the well-being of the parents and the health of the pups. But no, keep yelling that breeding crossbreeds is bad, mkay. And how everyone wanting one is an ignorant moron. While in the meantime puppy farms keep selling pups to people who will just stop listening to anything the crossbreed critics have to say because the accusations and non-constructive criticism doesn't actually teach them anything at all.

    Apuppyforme, you are actually making a difference by getting this pup from a responsible breeder. The more people do that, the more chance there is that the puppy farms will go bust unless they change their ways. So you totally have my support! And I cannot wait to hear about your pup.

    And don't leave because of this. In the end, when we talk about our dogs and their antics and the trials of training, etc we are all just dog owners and it doesn't matter anymore where your pup came from or what breed it is. Even the most staunch critics of your choice will admit that.

  8. #178
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    Someone asked, a page or two ago, if 'we' who oppose breeding for the sake of consumerism have ever owned cross breed dogs.

    I have. I've had pure breeds, cross breeds, purchased dogs and rescue dogs at some point. Dobes, Afghan Hpunds, Wolfhounds, JRT X Kelpie, BC X Curly Coat, an unknown bitsa... The list goes on.

    Each dog was selected each time based on my lifestyle and requirements such as exercise needs, grooming requirements, trainability, the size of my accommodation. NEVER, EVER based on 'looks'.

    When domeone comes on here asking 'what dog suits me?'... Noone here says 'oh, get one that looks cute'. No, we advise looking for a dog that suits the lifestyle.

    Isn't that interesting.

  9. #179
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    I selected my rescue dog because of her temperament too. Which is why I got a dog from foster care that had been 'road tested'. My previous dog was a total impulse acquisition though. The only trait I could guess before I got her was that she was most likely not going to be a barker. She wasn't an easy dog, but I dealt with it because she was my dog and I grew to love her.

    There are some here who are brave enough to admit that they got their dogs based on looks. You are not going to tell me that only crossbreed owners do that. Why otherwise would there be those suggestions to go for a similar looking purebred instead - with no genetic links whatsoever to the crossbreed in question? Would that not be a choice totally based on looks too? But it's ok because it's a purebred.

    I agree with Lala, double standards all the way.

  10. #180
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    V&F, no one argues that this isn't the right thing to do. But most people (and certainly most 'green' dog owners) don't function that way and don't make their choices that way. For the majority looks is the starting point when doing their research. And it's no good to ignore this fact, or talk it down... it won't go away. For most people it's a major factor when choosing a dog and if you look down, talk down, or plain insult these people, when they ask for advice all you'll achieve is them stop asking, but popping into the next pet store where they won't have to justify their choice.

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