Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: How Did You Get Yr Dogs to Accept People in the House

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Smithtown/Kempsey
    Posts
    82

    Lightbulb How Did You Get Yr Dogs to Accept People in the House

    Hi guys
    I would like to tap into your ways of how you taught yr dogs to accept foreigners in the house.
    So far... I haven't developed a good way.
    The Schnauzers are guard dogs, Schu doesn't like foreigners. So he barks barks barks, esp at men, but also at women.
    In two weeks I get friends to stay with us for a few days
    There are no paths, paths are made by walking
    www.rightnowyoga.blogspot.com
    2 Schnauzers, 1 mini girl 13 months, 1 standard boy 19 months.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    Ruby used to carry on like crazy when someone would come into the house, mainly men. It was our little jack russel x that used to set her off at the start because he was also very protective. She took over that trait of his.

    Which we only have ourselves to blame as we did very little to correct it.

    We started by sending ruby to her "bed" downstairs, which was just a big pillow with her blanket on it, every time someone would knock on the door.

    After about 5 mins of them being there we would call her to come off the bed.

    She would have a sniff and be over it.

    Didn't take long for her to get the point!
    Rubylisious


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    No special way here.

    My dogs go ballistic when someone arrives but as soon as I accept that person or whatever then they shut up and greet.

    Or if the person is already inside and the dog comes in, there is automatic acceptance.

    If I dont accept the person then neither do the dogs.

    Barney is an awesome guard dog...scary even

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    203

    Default

    you can also let them bark once or twice (letting you know that someone is there) then you tell them thank-you or enough or whatever you want. when they hear this they need to be quiet. something I have found to work is gently turn them away from whatever they are barking at and say the command and reward when quiet, rinse and repeat until they are quiet. it does help if your visitors come in and ignore the dogs completely and they get NOTHING (no attention, no treats etc) until they are quiet. will take a bit of work though haha
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." - Edward Hoagland

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Smithtown/Kempsey
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaz Tarja View Post
    you can also let them bark once or twice (letting you know that someone is there) then you tell them thank-you or enough or whatever you want. when they hear this they need to be quiet. something I have found to work is gently turn them away from whatever they are barking at and say the command and reward when quiet, rinse and repeat until they are quiet. it does help if your visitors come in and ignore the dogs completely and they get NOTHING (no attention, no treats etc) until they are quiet. will take a bit of work though haha
    Sounds good in principle..... But: The word GENTLY does not apply to my Standard, when he gets into bark-bark-bark mode. Last time I wanted to hold him back, because I had to sign for a parcel and was angry with the mad dog, I tried to hold him by the collar, he turned and nearly broke my wrist PLUS strangled himself and still barked. He is 20kg, all muscle and in uncontrollable motion. Not funny. He does not bite, and is not trained to go for people at all. He just barks! And as he is a deep chested dog, it is noisy.
    There are no paths, paths are made by walking
    www.rightnowyoga.blogspot.com
    2 Schnauzers, 1 mini girl 13 months, 1 standard boy 19 months.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaz Tarja View Post
    you can also let them bark once or twice (letting you know that someone is there) then you tell them thank-you or enough or whatever you want. when they hear this they need to be quiet. something I have found to work is gently turn them away from whatever they are barking at and say the command and reward when quiet, rinse and repeat until they are quiet. it does help if your visitors come in and ignore the dogs completely and they get NOTHING (no attention, no treats etc) until they are quiet. will take a bit of work though haha
    I like this, but i would also teach "place"....And that is where the dog has to be when anyone arrives. you might have to get some friends to help you get this in place initially..
    Victoria Stillwel has some really good videos on it...As do many of the clicker trainers.
    When you hold a dog by the collar, you often make them worse, it is like a lead aggression happening. The "time-out'' might also work.
    That is what I find so hard, when people have problems and we cannot see the dog in action and see wether it is fear or aggression or just bombastic loudmouth.
    Maybe you can get some help if some of the above does not work
    Pets are forever

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Rural Victoria
    Posts
    159

    Default

    I have a friend that breeds Standards, I asked her and she said they are a guarding breed so you need to work with the dog more so that he knows to listen to you when you say "enough".
    She suggested that you take him to obedience training.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    I'm considering holding a 'dog training party' to try solve my problems with the way my dog greets visitors. I'll get a few friends over, brief them on how I want them to react to the dog's bad and good behaviour and then get one of them to come in through the front door every 15 minute for a couple of hours. But her problem is jumping, which is easier to fix as it requires her to get close to the visitors.

  9. #9

    Default

    Another way could be have people come to the door and knock.
    Have the dog on the lead and just walk to the door.
    Sit your dog and give it a treat. Open the door and make sure your dog doesn't move.
    Give it a treat.
    Invite the guest in and give the dog a treat.
    Your dog will start to understand and I think in a short time he will understand.
    And being that bred which are among the smarter breeds he will be with the program so quick.
    And lastly you have to go to the door like the dog wasn't there or he will pick up on the vib that you are nervous.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Smithtown/Kempsey
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I'm considering holding a 'dog training party' to try solve my problems with the way my dog greets visitors. I'll get a few friends over, brief them on how I want them to react to the dog's bad and good behaviour and then get one of them to come in through the front door every 15 minute for a couple of hours. But her problem is jumping, which is easier to fix as it requires her to get close to the visitors.
    That sounds like an awsome idea.
    There are no paths, paths are made by walking
    www.rightnowyoga.blogspot.com
    2 Schnauzers, 1 mini girl 13 months, 1 standard boy 19 months.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •