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Thread: X Breeds or Mutts?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pepe001 View Post
    Another linked question (tongue in check) - Why do pitbull crosses that looks a bit like a pitbull are the only ones to bite. Why do the pitbull crosses that look more like the other dog not bite people?????

    I have a suspected lab*mastiff dog. He is like a big lab but has straight back legs like a mastiff - but in fact could be any big dog with straight back legs. Should I assume he is dangerous as he may be a mastiff cross or do I assume because he 'looks' like a lab he is ok?

    Going on looks to determine a dogs temperament is just so silly - but most of us know that.

    Just thought of another example - my sister has a dog that most people think is a border collie. Looks like a bad example of the breed - creamy red and white. But we know for a fact this dogs dad was a rough collie (same colour as lassie - saw it) and mum a light-looking german shepherd. (I suspect dingo*shepherd but she said pure german shepherd - also saw it). He is so not border collie in temperament and so dingo-like it is not funny. But if the BSL people decided border collies were dangerous he would be dead.
    LOL no loaded question and not about BSL it was 1am and raining brain farts at this end, in fact its exactly why I didn't put it in the BSL threads and why I DID put the NO BSL. It was a serious, is there testing or has there been studies done on ANY mixed/x's/mutts that were looked back to when people pump out facts about breeds based on what a cross breed/mutt/x has or has not done because for the life of me I can not work out how people can draw such long bows.

    It always use to annoy me when we would take our short or long term rescue dogs out and people would look and judge them based on their looks and then ask what type of dog he/she was, well I had no idea in some cases as it didn't look like ANY breed but the closer it got to looking like a fluffy dog, large or not people reacted like it was a cute and ok dog, the short coat large dogs normally looked like pig hunting crosses of all heights and descriptions where I was living at the time but the more "staffy" the head the more people stayed on the other side of the road.

    A friend use to look after an abused rescue Akita x Husky now that one WAS human and pet aggressive (and eventually pts because of it) and never to be trusted but you would have laughed at the amount of people that wanted to cuddle that "cute" dog I don't know what they thought when they looked up and saw the "Danger" sign on that one lmao.

    And yes I am still interested if anyone knows of blanket and conclusive temperament testing that has been done on cross breeds/mutts etc

    And trust me if it goes the BSL way I won't respond and would hope the thread was closed the other reason I posted here
    ALL kittens are devil spawn wrapped in cuteness!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdee View Post
    LOL no loaded question and not about BSL it was 1am and raining brain farts at this end, in fact its exactly why I didn't put it in the BSL threads and why I DID put the NO BSL. It was a serious, is there testing or has there been studies done on ANY mixed/x's/mutts that were looked back to when people pump out facts about breeds based on what a cross breed/mutt/x has or has not done because for the life of me I can not work out how people can draw such long bows.

    It always use to annoy me when we would take our short or long term rescue dogs out and people would look and judge them based on their looks and then ask what type of dog he/she was, well I had no idea in some cases as it didn't look like ANY breed but the closer it got to looking like a fluffy dog, large or not people reacted like it was a cute and ok dog, the short coat large dogs normally looked like pig hunting crosses of all heights and descriptions where I was living at the time but the more "staffy" the head the more people stayed on the other side of the road.

    A friend use to look after an abused rescue Akita x Husky now that one WAS human and pet aggressive (and eventually pts because of it) and never to be trusted but you would have laughed at the amount of people that wanted to cuddle that "cute" dog I don't know what they thought when they looked up and saw the "Danger" sign on that one lmao.

    And yes I am still interested if anyone knows of blanket and conclusive temperament testing that has been done on cross breeds/mutts etc

    And trust me if it goes the BSL way I won't respond and would hope the thread was closed the other reason I posted here
    This is exactly why I got a rescue dog, kdee! Because they are extensively temperament tested by their carers. I did go to the RSPCA, but there I had little more to go on than the supposed mix of breeds, which did indeed tell me nothing. Now the rescue people guessed that my dog was a kelpie x staffy. While I stayed clear of any dog with working dog in them when I checked the RSPCA and pound dogs - because I live in the suburbs and work 5 days a week - I didn't give a hoot about this one possibly having kelpie in her because the carers opinion about the dog told me that she'd be well suited to suburban life. And she is indeed nowhere near as hyper as kelpies can be and copes well with moderate physical and mental exercise.

    If purebreds all have a unique personality - which of course they do - it is even more true for crossbreeds that you cannot possibly guess what their temperament is like until you've actually lived with them. Even if you'd get them DNA tested to determine how much of each breed they have in them, that still does not tell you anything about which breed influences which part of them.

    If it's a mix of the same type of breeds, that would of course give you something to go on. My old dog was clearly a hunting type dog. But her personality wasn't all sighthound, even though she had two different breeds of sighthounds in her. She was actually a "kangaroo dog" which is a lose term for a certain type of mixed breed, like the pig dog. But the only fairly predictable trait of a kangaroo dog is that they are fairly large and built for speed. My dog did turn out to be a kangaroo hunter (unfortunately!), but not all of those fairly random mixes would be. Same with pig dogs, who are bred to be fairly stocky with strong muscles. But you wouldn't know if they were actually suitable for pig hunting unless you tried them.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    This is exactly why I got a rescue dog, kdee! Because they are extensively temperament tested by their carers. I did go to the RSPCA, but there I had little more to go on than the supposed mix of breeds, which did indeed tell me nothing. Now the rescue people guessed that my dog was a kelpie x staffy. While I stayed clear of any dog with working dog in them when I checked the RSPCA and pound dogs - because I live in the suburbs and work 5 days a week - I didn't give a hoot about this one possibly having kelpie in her because the carers opinion about the dog told me that she'd be well suited to suburban life. And she is indeed nowhere near as hyper as kelpies can be and copes well with moderate physical and mental exercise.

    If purebreds all have a unique personality - which of course they do - it is even more true for crossbreeds that you cannot possibly guess what their temperament is like until you've actually lived with them. Even if you'd get them DNA tested to determine how much of each breed they have in them, that still does not tell you anything about which breed influences which part of them.

    If it's a mix of the same type of breeds, that would of course give you something to go on. My old dog was clearly a hunting type dog. But her personality wasn't all sighthound, even though she had two different breeds of sighthounds in her. She was actually a "kangaroo dog" which is a lose term for a certain type of mixed breed, like the pig dog. But the only fairly predictable trait of a kangaroo dog is that they are fairly large and built for speed. My dog did turn out to be a kangaroo hunter (unfortunately!), but not all of those fairly random mixes would be. Same with pig dogs, who are bred to be fairly stocky with strong muscles. But you wouldn't know if they were actually suitable for pig hunting unless you tried them.
    The "pig dog's" I am talking about where I was living were all sorts, most based on mastiffs and then just crossed until you could no longer tell, not exactly scientific or breed trait based but more based on Frankenstein created dogs, and if the dog didn't perform it was dumped to be a family pet (great idea considering they were pretty unreliable temperaments) or was given a lead tablet to the head.

    We have always had at least one rescue dog, and the ones we have taken on full time have been beautiful but nothing matching a temperament of what breed they looked like or happened to be most similar to, my sons dog Scrap a little silky x is nothing like a silky and quiet as, but if my husband was mucking around with my son and holding him on the ground tickling him, my son knew that if he changed his tone to show pain then Scrap would immediately go in to bite/nip (no blood drawn) my OH until he backed off, then he would guard my son standing his ground deep growling increasing the distance between my son and OH, when the OH had been at a "safe" distance for a few minutes Scrap would grab my son by the wrist, cuff and try to drag him away and start to lick his face and nuzzle him trying to push him up. It was amazing to see a by then health 4 1/5kg fluff ball trying to "save" his best mate, and considering Scraps VERY abused history and the breed he looked like, strangely he always use to jump into my OH's lap for snuggles afterwards. Maybe that is what really opened my eyes to not passing a judgment based on a dogs looks because I know that if that had been anyone but me or my OH with my son Scrap would have seriously attacked.

    It would be very interesting if there was a study around on the temperaments of cross breed/mutts that also stated what breed standard they best fitted, looks like a duck and quacks like a swan, behaves like a swallow instead of looks like a duck and therefore quacks like a duck so it must be a duck. IMHO it scares me because that sort of attitude leads to more dangerous situations when people only identify based on looks like the example of the Akita x Husky. I suppose the other thing is that I don't identify anyone or thing based on looks I base on my experience otherwise I suppose I would not only be racist but sexist, ageist, and everything ist in between, I wonder if people that have a disposition to all or one of the ists are also more likely to judge based on a dogs looks good or bad. LOL ok now I am beginning to understand why no one has done a study as there would be way to many variables to include to get an accurate outcome.
    ALL kittens are devil spawn wrapped in cuteness!

  4. #14
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    You can make an assessment of temperment when the dog is in front of you.

    But breeders cannot make promises about the temperment of their dog. They can say that certain pedigree dogs are selected for a particular temperment but they can't promise. Some families of a particular breed may have desirable temperment traits more likely. For example I know some Rottweilers are much friendlier with people and dogs than others, from puppyhood. And it seems to be a family thing. Ie most all of the puppies from that family are embarrassingly friendly.

    A lot of people who see a dog with a big head, medium nose, short coat, obvious muscles, and rose/half prick ears will say "pitbull" whether they have any clue the parentage of the dog or not. I know someone who can't tell the difference between a pitbull and an SBT.

    And my dog - to any farmer - is obviously cattle dog cross but a lot of people I meet think she is staffy cross, or dalmation cross, or english pointer - even though she acts nothing like any of these dog breeds traditionally behave. She does do a lot of things cattle dogs traditionally do - or would if l let her like biting runners' heels.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    You can make an assessment of temperment when the dog is in front of you.

    But breeders cannot make promises about the temperment of their dog. They can say that certain pedigree dogs are selected for a particular temperment but they can't promise. Some families of a particular breed may have desirable temperment traits more likely. For example I know some Rottweilers are much friendlier with people and dogs than others, from puppyhood. And it seems to be a family thing. Ie most all of the puppies from that family are embarrassingly friendly.

    A lot of people who see a dog with a big head, medium nose, short coat, obvious muscles, and rose/half prick ears will say "pitbull" whether they have any clue the parentage of the dog or not. I know someone who can't tell the difference between a pitbull and an SBT.

    And my dog - to any farmer - is obviously cattle dog cross but a lot of people I meet think she is staffy cross, or dalmation cross, or english pointer - even though she acts nothing like any of these dog breeds traditionally behave. She does do a lot of things cattle dogs traditionally do - or would if l let her like biting runners' heels.
    Thanks Hyacinth I fully agree with what you have said and have come across a few vets that couldn't tell a breed even if it was a pure breed, amazes me how many people tell us that Zeke is a "pitbull" not bad considering he is a PB Bull Terrier lol I now tell people first he is an English Bull Terrier for some odd reason they then don't associate him with a "pitbull" and slip in that he is correctly called a Bull Terrier, personally I don't mind calling him an English Bull Terrier if it gets people to be more comfy around him, at least it gets his foot in the door until he can sook them into submission OH and I will put my hand up for being stupid as some dogs I just cant tell what they are, a friend has a lab x ? that I would swear was a "pitbull" from a distance and my brothers dog looks nothing like a PB Chi x PB mini Poodle lol it looks like a long haired rat and weighs around 1kg (his pic is up in my mob or cuddle monsters).
    ALL kittens are devil spawn wrapped in cuteness!

  6. #16
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    We had a professional dog trainer call a champion pedigree bull terrier a "pitty" for the whole seminar. The owner thought he was saying "piggy" as she (the dog) is very greedy when it comes to food. And almost as greedy when it comes to toys.

    I put it down to brain fade on the part of the professional.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    We had a professional dog trainer call a champion pedigree bull terrier a "pitty" for the whole seminar. The owner thought he was saying "piggy" as she (the dog) is very greedy when it comes to food. And almost as greedy when it comes to toys.

    I put it down to brain fade on the part of the professional.
    About the only "pitty" thing Zeke has going for him in the pitty looks he gives when things aren't going his way.
    ALL kittens are devil spawn wrapped in cuteness!

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