Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Pug Behaviour

  1. #1

    Exclamation Pug Behaviour

    We have two pugs, mother and son, which we adopted through a pug rescue organisation. Mother is 6.5yrs and Jet her son is 4.5yrs.

    I think they have come to us with a fair bit of baggage behind them. They don't really seek human companionship, rather whatever they can get their mouths into when inside. They scoff their food in 10 seconds (well, just over 10 seconds LOL) and fight over food if one finishes before the other. I think they've possibly not been fed properly at their previous home.

    They're very unusual for pugs, I've had them for over 40yrs now and know their characters inside and out.

    Jet is the one I worry about. He has a fixation for shadows and chases them *all day long*. He's on guard for them, waiting and concentrating till he sees one. Even flying birds and butterflies shadows are targets for him. All day.

    The reason I worry is that this is so obsessive. It doesn't look as though he's actually enjoying the chase, rather he's just so tensed up and on guard the whole day. He's skinny from never relaxing like pugs love to do, and also I think, from nervous tension.

    Does anybody have any ideas on how to treat this behaviour? Even just to understand it would be a bonus.

    Thank you for any input.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    When I was a teenager we had a German Sheperd that got obsessed with... chasing trains! We walked him near a railaway and he would run alongside that train (that was slowing down at that point as it was near the station) for a couple of kilometers. It got to the point where you could see every muscle in his body was tense the whole walk, just waiting for that train to come. He got too skinny too because of it. But that one of course was easy to fix, we just stopped taking him anywhere near the railway line.

    Chasing shadows will require a more direct intervention. I got a new dog 2 months ago and have become a huge fan of clicker training. I truly believe that it can fix most problem behaviours if you are willing to spend the time on it. If you are interested I can give you more information and some recommendations for books or online resources?

    Alternatively (or at the same time) you may want to find a dog behaviourist to help you with this? If you tell us where abouts you are located, some forum members can maybe make some recommendations for good behaviourists.

    I personally saw one at our local RSPCA years ago and found their advice quite useful, but it would depend on the individual and whether your nearest RSPCA provides private sessions with behavioural trainers.

    It must be very sad to see the effects of neglect in your dogs. How long have you had them for?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,583

    Default

    I think I'd deal with it the same way I deal with chasing joggers, cars, bicycles, possums, cats....

    Ie reward for attention on you. Most pugs are pretty food motivated, so distract pug from obsession, give him something else to do and reward. You might want to restrict his opportunity to repeat the behaviour because it would be self rewarding for a while eg a month, ie only let him be with his obsession when he's on lead and supervised by you and you prevent him from engaging the obsession.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    203

    Default

    That may be a little hard to deal with as if your not there all the time you cannot really do the above suggestions because it will not really work. i would think of looking at a professional to come in and look as they will be able to asses the dog properly. the last thing you want is to get him out of this habit but create another for him
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." - Edward Hoagland

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Rural Victoria
    Posts
    159

    Default

    I have sent you a private message, but just wanted to say i love your profile picture! What a gorgeous pair!

  6. #6

    Default

    The pugs have been with us for about 3 months now.

    I understand how distracting and rewarding could be a good thing, but I'm not able to do this on any lengthy basis. I'm sure constant attention is the answer, but in this modern day world time is hard to come by!

    Thank you for your input, any other ideas would be welcome

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,583

    Default

    You'd have to put obsessive dog in a crate when you were out / unable to supervise and cover it so there were no shadows.

    the only other method I know would be to drug it so it was less anxious/obsessive.

    Doggy day care might help if you haven't got time.

    I think a few minutes of working on distraction/substitute a day would help. As long as you don't use adversives like hitting the dog or yelling at it, you're unlikely to make more problems.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •