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Thread: Poodle Was Mauled in at an Off Leash Beach

  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by wuffles View Post
    One of my dogs seems to be a "target" for aggressive dogs. I'm not sure what causes it but she is friendly and submissive.

    She, and I, can deal with disagreements between dogs... over sticks or toys, or one getting in another's face. But it is a COMPLETELY different matter when she is minding her own business, a dog comes up behind her and has a go. I don't care whether the dog inflicts an actual injury or not - it is NOT ok and it is NOT normal dog behaviour.

    It can severely affect both the dog and owner's mental state, whether it draws blood or not. When a dog starts posturing and snarling, how am I to know it's just going to rough her up a bit rather than kill her?

    While I do agree that the word 'maul' is probably not the right one, if they were concerned enough to report it, then it certainly gave them a fright and is worth investigating.
    Anyone should have reported this incident even if they were the most confident dog person, this owner and dog needed to be reported, if only to kick the ACO/Council butt into gear. I never said the incident didn't happen or wasn't worth reporting. I also never said it wasn't frightening. Actually I said it was terrible and frightening on more than one occasion.

    I also agreed it would possibly leave the dog mentally scarred/changed, as I have had a dog go through similar and come out different, if only a little bit, she now acts different around dogs who are fearful.

    Scraps and fights ARE normal dog behaviour, what we as their owners need to do is understand this, understand our dogs limitations and make sure we do not allow them to go into a situation which would cause them to get into a scrap or a fight. The owner of this dog either didn't know his dogs limitations or didn't care (more likely) and has now given Councils more ammo against bull breeds (especially Staffys who are already in the firing line).

    I also do not think it is ok for dogs to be allowed to bully and posture at each other and certainly isn't ok for their owners to let them "sort it out", hence the reason I do not go to off leash parks because the majority of interactions in off leash areas are bullying and posturing.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by wuffles View Post
    One of my dogs seems to be a "target" for aggressive dogs. I'm not sure what causes it but she is friendly and submissive.

    She, and I, can deal with disagreements between dogs... over sticks or toys, or one getting in another's face. But it is a COMPLETELY different matter when she is minding her own business, a dog comes up behind her and has a go. I don't care whether the dog inflicts an actual injury or not - it is NOT ok and it is NOT normal dog behaviour.

    It can severely affect both the dog and owner's mental state, whether it draws blood or not. When a dog starts posturing and snarling, how am I to know it's just going to rough her up a bit rather than kill her?

    While I do agree that the word 'maul' is probably not the right one, if they were concerned enough to report it, then it certainly gave them a fright and is worth investigating.
    Ah, having been the owner of a bully dog, I know what you mean with 'target'. My dog was a rescue and I do not know what happened to her before I got her but she was a true bully towards other dogs and the more submissive the other dog was, the more she tried to bully it by standing over them, growling, and walking around it with stiff legs and a threatening look. I never got that either, but I did have one or two owners say something about their dog being so timid that they seemed to bring out the worst in some other dogs. I still don't know how that works. But regardless, it is the owner of the dog who tries to bully who needs to interfer and make sure they can control their dog and prevent them threatening or attacking another dog.

    This should probably go into another thread, but my new rescue dog seems to bring out the best in other dogs. I've only had her for 2 months and have had numerous dog owners say to me that their dog had not played like that with a dog for years. The odd dog that has shown that they didn't like her, left her alone as soon as she turned her back to them. It must be something in her body language. She never looks aggressive or threatening but also very rarely looks submissive. But I cannot really put my finger on it and it's not something I have done at all. It may have had something to do with her having apparently had little human interaction and therefor more bonding with her litter perhaps?
    Last edited by Beloz; 09-23-2011 at 02:04 PM.

  3. #53
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    I know a couple of dogs that go for submissive dogs. One is an iggy x and the other is a rottweiler. The iggy x seems to have grown out of it. The Rottweiler got attacked a while back and now has a I'll get them first attitude. And the owner won't fix it as long as he thinks she's just "playing".

    So out of the hundreds and thousands of dogs we've met, only two go for submissive dogs. Some try for all dogs. Most will happily make friends with submissive dogs. So a dog that attacks a submissive dog is psychologically broken. Ie submitting is supposed to prevent or stop an attack not provoke it.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Ie submitting is supposed to prevent or stop an attack not provoke it.
    That's what I would have thought, but it doesn't seem to be that uncommon from my conversations with those owners of very submissive dogs?

  5. #55
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    I would say it is uncommon given 1000 dogs say, only 2 of them would attack a submissive dog. About 900 including the fear aggressive ones would be fine. And the rest would attack any and every dog they met. In my experience so far.

  6. #56
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    It's the same with humans and their bullying techniques though, always going for the weaker more vulnerable person over someone who will clobber the crap out of them lol

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    It's the same with humans and their bullying techniques though, always going for the weaker more vulnerable person over someone who will clobber the crap out of them lol
    That is exactly why I called my dog a bully, Jadielee. She would also harass other dogs if given a chance and she never backed down if another dog started a fight. But she was more full on with very submissive dogs. I wish I'd known that I could've possibly trained her out of it, but I thought then that she was already too old for that when I got her.

    She used to be pretty narky around puppies too - though somewhat understandably if they were too boisterous and jumpy. Until she became old and suddenly she seemed to love them and always treated them gently.

    She was great with little dogs, so she wasn't a total psychopath.

  8. #58

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    I think the one main difference with human to dog Bullies is the human usually needs another person to egg them on and once alone a lot of them are just scared little sheep. While a dog just nost often only need itself.
    This isn't the case all the time but is is a bigger percentage of it I would think.

  9. #59

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    If any dog at an unleashed park came bounding over to mine and tried to eat it, I would be majorly pissed off if the people at this forum blamed my dog for "eye balling" or causing it, instead of offering compassion.
    Some of you people worry me.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by puggerup View Post


    If any dog at an unleashed park came bounding over to mine and tried to eat it, I would be majorly pissed off if the people at this forum blamed my dog for "eye balling" or causing it, instead of offering compassion.
    Some of you people worry me.
    I agree Pugger.

    And I hope I wasn't giving the impression that I was blaming submissive dogs for making my old dog react in an anti-social way. I was merely pondering on the psychology of some dogs. There is no excuse for allowing your dog to behave in an anti-social way.

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