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Thread: When is Old - Too Old?

  1. #11
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    gold dog

    I don't think there is too old. Why don't you go to an agility competition day and have a look. There's a lady at my club - I think she's well over 60, doing agility with her welsh springer spaniel. And there are several ladies including a few over 70 still playing hockey.

    The best agility handlers - don't actually run much, they stand in strategic places on the course and point and call and their dog does the appropriate obstacle in the right direction and it's truly spectacular to watch. Same deal with herding comps. Handler shouldn't be running much. But learning herding sometimes involves being crash tackled by stroppy sheep. Duck herding might be easier.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweetboy View Post
    I am a nurse in the public health system- and I admit I think there is a "too old"...
    I recently looked after a man in his 90s who has a 7 mth old kelpie- never walked, and now he is ill a big problem to find a "carer" (he refuses to rehome the dog in case he suddenly is well enough to go home and look after it.)
    This is not an isolated story.
    Pets are fantastic and give great companionship- however owners need to be realistic about their ability to care for the animal and be open to getting help to walk them etc.

    The op sounds like their dog is exercised and cared for and a loved companion who they have had for 6 yrs. Sounds like a good setup, there are many dogs that live boring lives forever in their backyard who would much prefer an older owner who has the time and ability to care for them.
    I was going to write: that's more about being sick, not necessarily about being old, but I do definitely see your point.

    The OP is obviously coping well with having an active dog. But if someone in their 80s told me they considered getting a kelpie or other working dog pup, I would strongly advice they'd go for a breed with a lower need for excercise and stimulation. And to consider who would take care of their dog if they were to get ill or had to move to a nursery home, go into hosipital, etc, before they get another dog. Provided they do that, I see no problem with someone having "a" dog no matter how old they are though.

    My stepfather died of cancer a couple of years ago. He was only in his early 60s. Had a GSD. He'd always had GSDs that he used for his work as security guard. Now the dog still lives with my mother, who is 70 and has some serious health problems and frankly doesn't seem to really grasp how to look after that type of dog. It was a bit sad last time I saw them (they are in Belgium). The dog clearly doesn't get the stimulation he needs. I have tried to convince her to find him a new home, but there are so many emotional issues attached to that, that she has not considered it yet. Sorry, off-topic!
    Last edited by Beloz; 08-29-2011 at 12:33 PM.

  3. #13

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    Easiest way to give your dog a good workout - teach her to play ball. Get yourself a ball thrower(takes very little effort to throw a fair distance - it's more about co-ordination/timing than muscle). My dog will spend an hour each day chasing his ball at the beach/park, i don't have to do much but sit there and throw it for him, he loves it, i get the pleasure of watching him have an awesome time ... win/win!

    The only downside is dogs can get very ball obsessed. I won't play ball at home, only at the beach. So he knows not to even bother bringing me a ball at home, but i can't go to the park without a ball.

  4. #14
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    Your only as old as you feel there is another saying but its abit R18+

    I think age has little to do with a person capability as I know plenty of "Young" pet owners honestly dont do a crash hot job! I actually think the "older" generation can be better equipped to owning an animal as they have the time and patients for them.

    If there is something you feel you are physically unable to do ie walking, training etc then there is always people that can be hired to help you out.
    Last edited by Bulldog_Lover; 08-29-2011 at 03:53 PM.
    Rubylisious


  5. #15

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    My thoughts are too old can be any age, I mean some people seem too old to manage dogs at 40 yet some still go great guns at 90.

    Lots of people with severe physical limitations can manage dogs just fine as well, all the dogs needs are med and more so, and on the other flip of the coin some completely able bodied people seem not to manage at all.

    Just a personal judgement call imo.
    If you find yourself going through hell; Don't stay. Just keep on going.
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  6. #16
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    Thank you everyone for your input. Jorjie is happy and fortunately a healthy dog. During wet weather, we play fetch ball up and down the hallway. I take her to the leash free beach as often I can, but she's never shown any interest in swimming. I wouldn't mind going herding ducks with her, don't think I could withstand an onslaught by a rampant sheep - maybe a duck nip woulnd't be too bad.

  7. #17

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    Hey Gold-Dog, just to put things even more in perspective, my father is 70 but cannot any more be active with his dog so I have taken over the responsibility, this is not age related but health related.

    If his health was fine he would still be 100% active in the dogs life.

    Lets hope those ducks don't nip too much, mine was chased by a gaggle of geese and it was the funniest thing I have ever seen in my life! honking and shrieking god it was funny.

  8. #18
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    Guard geese are to be respected. Ducks however, I can cope with being thoroughly chewed over by a duck beak and it doesn't seem to do any damage. Unlike sheep, they go where they're told without much pressure from the dog, so is a lot easier than sheep herding. My worry would be dog damaging the ducks. She took some fluff off an extremely rough Airedale the other day, and that's a big no no for ducks or sheep.

  9. #19
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    LOL at a duck nip. I have been bitten by many a duck and there is absolutely no pain involved at all.

    I agree with others, I dont think there is a too old, though there may be a too unwell. I think though as you get older, the breed of choice might need to change a bit to meet more with physical limitation etc. While it might be great to have a border collie who needs lots of stimulation when you are in your 30's, they might not be so much fun in our 80's so you might want to go or something like a pug LOL. You still get the great doggy companionship but in a much easier to handle form.

  10. #20

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    Excpt the balls hehe
    just seeing a man geting biten by a duck in the ball s honk honk laughs
    If you are reading this then you're doing just fine as to
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