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Thread: Beagle? Help!

  1. #71
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    I do wonder if the fact that so many end up at the shelter (staffy or staffy x's) means that they are difficult dogs for first owners or just that they are such a popular breed?

  2. #72

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    Beagles are awsome dogs!!!!!! But...... hard to train. My beagle is the best family dog I could have ever hoped for. She is instinctively gentle with my kids, is fantastic around the horses and any animal she can get close enough to to sniff she then couldnt careless about it, she is soooo sooky and follows me around nagging me to sit down at the end of the day cos that is her time. She will come anywhere with me and is friendly to any one and everyone. She rarely barks and has NEVER destroyed a single thing ever!

    BUT

    She is also independant and nose orientated. If she catches a sent she is gone and wont come back till she has found it same with any animal that runs from her she has to chase it and smell it then she is done. She ia also hard to train and yaps and pulls on lead, which no amount of training or dog school has seemed to fix.


    I also have a 5 month ols lab...... and she is perfect in everyway. Low exercise needs, half an hr either everyday or every second day. She is extreemly obiediant by nature. She will sit off lead and follow me off lead all day long whether at homa or somewhere new she just likes to be in sight of me all the time ( like at people houses at the horse property and dog parks) extreemly easy to train. She never barks, ever.

    But

    if left alone for a long time, I am a sahm so this is rare for her, she will destoy something ( normally filling the backyard with pieces of her destroyed toys)............she also needs consistancy in training as she can be boysterous if left to her own devices.

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I do wonder if the fact that so many end up at the shelter (staffy or staffy x's) means that they are difficult dogs for first owners or just that they are such a popular breed?
    I am going to go with popular. I just dont think they are difficult dogs at all, they love to please. They are made to please their master.

    I grew up with purebred staffs, and owned 2 half staffies and they were awesome dogs. My staff/lab x was th emost gentlest dog ever and super easy to train. My staff/boxer x was a little more trying but what you get with that mix is (or what we got) a very high energy, short attentioned spanned dog lol. He was fantastic though in many ways

  4. #74

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    I find most english staffies to be stubborn. Yes they like to please BUT if what you want them to do isn't what they feel is in their best interest they will completely ignore you. I've been around many many staffies, pures and crosses. No two are completely alike.

    I do think you need to be a very strong leader to effectively have one in your home.

    A lot wind up in the shelters for being way too boisterous for kids. For escaping all the time, for the 'staffy scream' that sounds like they're being murdered. I'll take a video of the neighbours staffy so you can hear the scream if you've never heard it before. Just let me know if you want me to.

    If you want a dog to go everywhere, on the back of the ute etc, enjoy camping & fishing etc, I'd go a pure blue heeler. Older, not a puppy, around 1-2 years old. They bond very firmly with one person. Protect the house, need a bit of training to keep them occupied but aren't always on the go. They love nothing more than to be around you but if they've been trained can handle being alone for extended periods of time without getting destructive. They will go anywhere with you, do anything just because they're with you.

    The ones you get from shelters can come with issues that have not been explained to the shelter staff, I would look at private rescue (even on PetRescue - find your new best friend!) and go from there. Oh, heelers should weigh up to 25 kgs, but you can get them heavier.

  5. #75
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    LOL at the staffy scream. I know that sound well.

    Like you, I have been around lots of staffies. Grew up with purebreds and half the dogs I have owned as an adult have been half staffy. I have yet to meet a difficult one myself...though our boxer/staffy x was a very trying dog - extremely high energy and a very short attention span....you might even say "hyperactive".

    I reckon alot just end up in shelters because of the popularity of the breed/cross. You could say the same about labradors too. People expect them to come as those perfect family dogs so a lot end up elsewhere due to being super boisterous and being labelled as hyperactive by people who didnt understand that to become that perfect family dog portrayed they have to put lots of effort in.

    It goes for all breeds. If you want a brilliant dog then you need to put the effort in to help them get where you want them.

    My first dog all on my own was a staffy/lab x and she was easy easy easy.

    I guess it's a mixed bag really, but personally, I find staffs to be great little dogs and not that difficult (granted, this could be due to growing up them so I am kinda blinded to faults as all the ones I knoew were fantastic LOL)

  6. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I do wonder if the fact that so many end up at the shelter (staffy or staffy x's) means that they are difficult dogs for first owners or just that they are such a popular breed?
    I think the main reason for it is so many BYBs breed staffies or staffy x's. And, they have a tendency to be chewers so people not willing to put in the effort will just dump them.

  7. #77

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    There are a LOT of staffy breeders out there. Unfortunately like many bully breeds they can be status dogs, which means they are often owned by the wrong people for the wrong reasons.
    Some people buy them expecting them to be vicious guard dogs then surrender them when they turn out to be nice family pets.
    Others buy them, do no training, then surrender them when the dogs starts peeing on the carpet or tearing things up.

  8. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crested_Love View Post
    There are a LOT of staffy breeders out there. Unfortunately like many bully breeds they can be status dogs, which means they are often owned by the wrong people for the wrong reasons.
    Some people buy them expecting them to be vicious guard dogs then surrender them when they turn out to be nice family pets.
    Others buy them, do no training, then surrender them when the dogs starts peeing on the carpet or tearing things up.
    We see a few of those around here too - often become escape artists too. Most of them are not desexed either. At least not the boys: easy to spot! And that would also increase the number of staffy crosses that are surrendered.

    Such a shame as they are such awesome dogs when cared for properly.

  9. #79
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    I have heard a few things, great at escaping, noisey noisey noisey, chewers and when they do breed they have large litters.

    The english Staffy who Ruby now visits is very quiet, doesnt run away or even try but she does do a little bit of chewing.. I think thats from bordem as the owner doesnt do much with her.
    Rubylisious


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