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Thread: Beagle? Help!

  1. #61
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    Aug 2011
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    And I do second the rescue dog option. The upside of that is that:
    a) the foster carers know the dog well and can tell you a lot about them, including if they would cope with being alone during the day and how much excercise they need. They can tell you about their bad habits and how hard it may be to train them out of those (mine was a jumper - fairly easy behaviour to reverse). They can definitely tell you if they are barkers. Etc.
    b) you can get a (slightly) older dog. Puppies are very cute but they are more work than an older dog and most will struggle with being left for 8 hours a day.
    c) you get to take the dog on trial for a couple of weeks and return them if you discover that it really won't work.

    I'm up to my second rescue dog and have never regretted my choice.

  2. #62
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    Jun 2009
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    I have a cattle dog cross staffy.

    Now that she is an adult (2 years old) she has calmed down a lot, and can withstand a day in the backyard while we're at work without too much drama or destruction.

    As a puppy, she was a big chewer, very destructive to the plants, washing on the line, anything else she could get her jowls on. So if you go the staffy route, be prepared to lose a few things to chewing and to make an effort with keeping anything you want safe out of the dog's reach.

    Ziggy loves people- but barks at strangers, particularly strange men. I think this is more the cattle dog protectiveness than the staffy side of her, I have heard staffys will follow just about anyone.

    Ziggy does get anxious if she can see us but can't get to us, or if we are walking away. For example if I walk to the local shop to get something but leave her in the yard, she cries for quite some time. If we drive away she has no issue. Also if we are at the beach and go swimming, she tries to swim out to us (even if there is another person at the beach she knows), and then she panics at being in deep water. She loves the beach though and hanging out with us while we are fishing. At night she cuddles with us on the couch.

    Ziggy was very easy to train, she is highly food and reward motivated (ball throwing for example, this was how we taught her 'stay' and 'drop'). Since she is a mixed breed it is hard to say which parent she got this intelligence from. She loves 'fetch' more than any other dog I have known, and would happily play it all day every day (sticks, balls). She gets on reasonably well with other dogs (especially a few she has seen a few times, she has one 'special friend' in particular) and is very gentle with our cats.

  3. #63
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    I have also house-sat for a place that had a corgi. He was great fun, loved walks but wasn't overly strong and didn't need hours of walking a day. He loved the water as well. He didn't bark much and didn't have any naughty habits.

  4. #64

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    ty every you've given me a lot to think about, ty ty ty

  5. #65
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    Aug 2009
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    Staffies can be crap swimmers.

    My brother's staffy took a flying leap into my friend's Dam, and sunk under the water like a stone - and my brother leaped straight in after.

    So I guess it depends how wet you want to get when you go fishing. Or you can fit the staffy with a life jacket.

    The only dogs I know that won't wander off lead are the small lap dog types like Lahaso Apso, Bichon Frise, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. Most of the rest can be trained to hang with you but they won't when they're puppies or untrained.

    Before You Get Your Puppy | Dog Star Daily
    Choosing a puppy | RSPCA Australia | For all creatures, great & small.
    PetRescue - find your new best friend!

  6. #66

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    Just to give a point of view on working dog crosses (ACD, Kelpie, BC etc).

    I have a high drive, excitable Kelpie cross.

    I work part time and just have enough time to give him the proper exercise.

    He gets 2 hour long, brisk walks a day with running thrown in as well, normally around 6-8 training sessions (short) per day and we have an agility course set up in the back yard which we practice with at least once a day. After all that we still need around an hour and a half of racing around time. At the moment he has three other dogs to play with as well.

    Now once all of that is done I STILL have to give him a command to settle down and go to sleep or he'll just want to do it all over again. He is highly prey driven, without doing training in drive I'd never be able to control him and we still have issues with birds.

    I would highly recommend looking into the Spaniels (still energetic but not to the level I've explained above) or maybe even pointers. Corgi's are good too.

    Rescue dogs can be awesome if they have been in foster care and you're aware of what you're getting into. Not all working dogs or their crosses have an 'off' switch and they can be a nightmare to live with if that energy isn't focussed into something constructive.

    Just wanted to give you the other side of the coin.

  7. #67
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    For fishing I dont think there is a more fish obsessed dog than a Jack Russel and they swim like champions too.
    Diving Dog Jack Russell Terrier - YouTube

  8. #68
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    Wow Angela, that is full on! And it is why I stayed clear of the working dog crosses that had clearly inherited the hyperactive gene. I found it quite hard, because there are so many working dog crosses at the pound and RSPCA and they all looked so lovely. But I work and am a single parent and I just don't have the energy to spend that much time on the dog.

    My current dog supposedly has kelpie in her, but she is not overly energetic at all - especially for a 10mo pup. She seems happy with a 30 min walk twice a day and some enrichment toys and bones in the backyard when I'm out (and annoying the cats). Which is one of the reasons why I drove 800kms to get her.

    And now we're on the topic... Aussietomtom: I haven't read those resources Hyacinth posted (but think you should ), but I can tell you about some of the criteria I had when I looked for a rescue dog. They were very much based on my experiences with my previous dog. Whom I loved to bits, but she had some bad habits that made life a bit difficult sometimes.

    My criteria were:
    Not too hyperactive - ie. happy with 1 hour walking a day and staying in the backyard for 6 hrs a day on average during the week.
    Has to love people and kids (ie. not be skittish or fearful around them)
    Has to get on with other dogs (I had a dog who bullied other dogs and it was a pain in the proverbial)
    Has to have a low to moderate prey drive.
    Medium-sized

    Personally, I couldn't care less about what they looked like. I chose my dog based on temperament. I have met some downright ugly dogs that made up for their bad looks with loads of personality, affection and a lovely nature.

  9. #69

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    I have a beagle who would be what I would describe as one of the most "extreme" beags I've met (and I've met A LOT and know many breeders, showies, pet owners etc).

    For the right person beags make great family dogs, they are a great size, the breed describes them as a 'merry little hound' and IMO that describes the breed to a T.

    They aren't typically a soft dog, they need exercise and training but with the right person they are great dogs. I like having an active dog so my beagle is a good fit for me, even though I work full time she's fine at home by herself during the day. I don't walk her every day but I'll take her for a run with me three times a week and we do obedience and agility.

    There's no reason why beagles can't be reliable off leash, mine is, as long as you are prepared to put the work in it is achievable.

    I know many beags that are less drivey and full on than mine, it really depends on what breeder you go to and making sure you are clear with them what you want in your dog.

    My beag proving reliable recalls are achievable...

    Beagle recall! - YouTube

  10. #70
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    Nov 2010
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    Brisbane
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    OP, if you like staffies, I would absolutely get one (I am assuming we mean staffs not AmStaffs - though nothing wrong with them either).

    Reasonably smallish so easy to take everywhere. They love their people. They are easy to toilet train and love to please their owners.

    I disagree completely about them being for only experienced owners (unless people mean the AmStaff which I dont know much about). I think Staffies are brilliant little dogs. Always happy, can be a little boisterous at times. Some can have a bit of dog aggression so youd probably want to make sure you socialise them lots.

    All my opinion of course.

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