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Thread: Vets Happy with RAW Diets

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChoppaChop View Post
    Anne do you only feed dry?



    edited to reduce bluntness - treading softly round here of late
    No, and until you said that and I re-read the OP, I took it that the Vet was pushing dry and raw combined (ie a balanced diet in my view). Oops, my bad!

    Sorry, I recommend feeding both.
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  2. #12

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    dry thats all ym mum brys but i have to be there to make shoue she brys the rigth one super coat puppy 12 m them super coat juner and so on but if she doe bry the rong one i feed nugget people food mum hates that
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  3. #13
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    Vets will often recommend the "balanced" dry food because they get money for selling it - so you should ask what their commission is, and then go get a bag of the stuff they're pushing and ask them to explain why the first four ingredients are good for a dog.

    Eg

    The Dog Food Project - Ingredients to avoid

    and for one of the popular foods pushed by vets cos they get a cut
    Dog Food Reviews - Hill's Science Diet Lamb Meal & Rice Canine Maintenance - Powered by ReviewPost
    Lamb Meal, Brewers Rice, Rice Flour, Ground Whole Grain Wheat, Ground Whole Grain Sorghum, Corn Gluten Meal, Cracked Pearled Barley, Animal Fat (preserved with mixed tocopherols and citric acid), Dried Beet Pulp, Soybean Oil, Chicken Liver Flavor, Flaxseed, Potassium Chloride, Iodized Salt, Choline Chloride, Vitamin E Supplement, vitamins (L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate (source of vitamin C), Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Taurine, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Preserved with Mixed Tocopherols and Citric Acid, Beta-Carotene, Rosemary Extract.

    And the review
    Pros: First ingredient is a named meat product.
    Cons: Insufficient meat content, use of low quality grains and other controversial fillers, fat of unidentifiable origin.


    The first ingredient is a named meat product, in meal form. This is the sole meat product in the food.

    The primary grain is brewers rice which is a low quality grain and by-product. Rice flour, the third ingredient, is a grain fragment and filler.

    The fourth ingredient is wheat. The use of wheat is a significant negative: wheat is believed to be the number one cause of allergy problems in dog food. This is another ingredient we prefer not to see used at all in dog food.

    Sorghum is a carbohydrate source low in digestibility. We consider it primarily filler. Corn gluten meal is another low quality ingredient. Corn is a problematic grain that is difficult for dogs to digest and thought to be the cause of a great many allergy and yeast infection problems. We prefer not to see this used in dog food. The AAFCO definition of corn gluten meal is "the dried residue from corn after the removal of the larger part of the starch and germ, and the separation of the bran by the process employed in the wet milling manufacture of corn starch or syrup, or by enzymatic treatment of the endosperm". In plain English, that which remains after all the nutritious bits have been removed.

    Barley is a decent quality grain, but with six grains following the meat product, this starts to look like a very grain heavy food.

    Animal fat is a further low quality ingredient and is impossible to determine the source. Unidentified ingredients are usually very low quality. AAFCO define this as "obtained from the tissues of mammals and/or poultry in the commercial processes of rendering or extracting. It consists predominantly of glyceride esters of fatty acids and contains no additions of free fatty acids. If an antioxidant is used, the common name or names must be indicated, followed by the words "used as a preservative".

    Beet pulp is further filler and a controversial ingredient – it is a by-product, being dried residue from sugar beets which has been cleaned and extracted in the process of manufacturing sugar. It is a controversial ingredient in dog food, claimed by some manufacturers to be a good source of fibre, and derided by others as an ingredient added to slow down the transition of rancid animal fats and causing stress to kidney and liver in the process. We note that beet pulp is an ingredient that commonly causes problems for dogs, including allergies and ear infections, and prefer not to see it used in dog food. There are less controversial products around if additional fibre is required.

  4. #14
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    The review is wrong and is from an unrealible commercially based source. I am surprised you are using it Hya.

    Wheat is not considered to be the number one cause of diet related allergies in dogs. Beef and chicken are are the most common.

    I'd also suggest that the site makes profit on selling and or advertising products ....Just like what you say the Vets are doing.
    Last edited by Anne; 08-17-2011 at 02:40 PM.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  5. #15
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    Two different sites say the same things.

    I say a dog cannot live on bread alone.

  6. #16
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    WSAVA 2001 - Update on Food Allergy in the Dog and Cat
    The most common proven allergens in the dog are beef, chicken, milk, eggs, corn, wheat, and soy; in the cat, fish and milk products.
    Food Allergies & Food Intolerance in Dogs

    And I just matched you with two different sites that also lists chicken and beef as the most common.

    It is ludicrous to claim that wheat is the most common cause. Not only ludicrous, but WRONG.
    Last edited by Anne; 08-17-2011 at 03:03 PM.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  7. #17
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    I am so over the argument that dry food or commercial pet food cause skin issues because it is clear they do not, not any more than any raw food you will feed your dog at any rate.

    Sure, commercial foods are filled with additives and preserviatives and I can;t see these as being great, but the very fact that beef and chicken are the main causes of diet related allergies in dogs seems to be overlooked all the time.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  8. #18
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    Here's some more for you;
    Allergy in dogs types causes and treaments

    Symptoms of Common Dog Food Allergies

    Causes of Common Dog Food Allergies

    Dogs are generally allergic to the proteins present in pet food. The most common triggers are:

    ◦chicken eggs
    ◦chicken
    ◦beef
    ◦wheat
    ◦soy
    ◦corn
    ◦dairy products
    Of these, beef and dairy products are the most likely to cause an allergic reaction in your dog.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  9. #19
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    More:
    skin allergies in dogs | Dog Itching Solutions

    Food Allergies
    Skin allergies caused by reactions to food are uncommon in dogs. It is wrongly believed that dogs only react to a change of diet. However, vets recognise that reactions are just as likely to occur after a dog has been fed on a particular diet for several months or even years. If a dog is suffering from intolerance to a particular food, then there’s likely to be vomiting or diarrhoea, but not always.

    Do consult your vet for advice. Usually the only reliable way to diagnose food allergy is by feeding the dog a trial diet for at least six weeks. If the dog shows improvement from being fed the trial diet, then this new diet should become the dog’s normal diet.

    The most commonly accepted causes of food allergies in dogs are beef, cereals and dairy products.
    And I could keep googling and copying and pasting all night. Sure, don't feed your dog kibble because it will cause a skin issue, give him raw beef or chiken too and then wonder why his skin still doesn't loko any good.

    The fact is that almost all kibbles also contain chicken, beef or some kind of dairy prodcut and even those that don't have it as a main ingredient will still coat their kibble in chicken or beef fat to ensure it is palatable for your dog. That is why kibble 'appears' to be the main culprit, it is not because of wheat.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  10. #20

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    But Anne you could then argue that dogs are allergic to beef and chicken because most beef and chicken products fed to dogs are grain (wheat) fed instead of grass fed.

    So in all honesty dogs are probably allergic to the wheat/grain content in meat these days because that is the main staple of cows and chickens these days.

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