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Thread: Electric Dog Fences - Your Thoughts.. Reviews Please!

  1. #1

    Default Electric Dog Fences - Your Thoughts.. Reviews Please!

    Our JRT x goes walkabout during the day but is always home before we get there (so we had no idea he was doing it until a neighbour told us).

    Our 2 dogs have about 1 acre to play in which is all dog fenced but our boy is smart enough to dig under it! Since he's been escaping we've started penning them during the day in a 3x6m by 2 level area (on and under deck) but our JRT x is now trying to dig his way out!

    We're running out of options on how to keep him safe. I don't like the idea of electric dog fences but apparently after a few zaps they remember their boundary's and you don't need to use one?

    Would love your thoughts?

  2. #2

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    I have used one twice and my best friend currently has one in use.

    Scenario one: staffy x was a jumper/climber, could scales our 6 foot timber fence. We positioned the electrice tape roughly 18 inches off the ground and around 12 inches into the yard from the fence line. This prevented her from jumping up the fence and climbing over. She was zapped twice and never went there again.

    Scenario two: Our two Amstaffs took a liking to chewing the wiring under the truck that gets parked in the open bay of the shed. After the third time and failing to stop them by spraying eucalyptus oil etc we put up a double run of electric tape, one 6 inches off the slab and the other 6 inches above that, this didn't allow room to go through, under or over without being zapped. It took two zaps and no more trying to get in.

    Best friends: set up above the line of the fence as the ridgey goes over the fence.

    Being a digger, it should be easy. Run not far off ground and close to fence, the JRT x won't be able to get to the base of the fence to dig out.

    The ones we used were variable in strength and we only had them on low and that was enough.
    Cheers Aleesha
    Lilly, OH & Boof ..... the 3 things that make life tick!

    All posts made under the name of "Shelby-001" are copywritten and may not be used in any publication or media without my prior written consent!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
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    3,784

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    We have a top wire electric on all our fences as we have horses. Stops them leaning. All our dogs have hit this at one time or another and all our dogs are very respectful of wire fences. Even when they are not electric.

    We have hit this fence too and we also respect the fence

    We had a friend with two digging labs, she borrowed our portable traveling electric fence and rigged up some low wires. It has worked for them too.
    Pets are forever

  4. #4

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    The invisible fences? Useless.
    Real, wire fences? A handy tool.

    With invisible fences if the dog really wants to get out it will ignore the shock and just run.
    But if the dog wants to come back in, the need is never enough to risk getting shocked again.

    With real fences that have a voltage there is at least a physical barrier as well as the shock which is more of a deterrent and with a real solid fence it also prevents the sudden escapes (ie: chasing a cat or rabbit).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
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    203

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    If you have tried everything (i.e burying wire under the fence line, taking the dog for lots of walks so its not bored and wanting to escape etc etc) you can have great success with the electric wire. I will say make sure it is connected to a battery not a the main line as it is safer all around.

    Also you will prob be able to turn it off after they have zapped themselves a few times. Just make sure you are home the first few days after you install it.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." - Edward Hoagland

  6. #6

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    People up on the main street of our town have got a 2 wire electric fence.
    They have got it placed in front of the garden bed which by the way looks really good.
    We have walked past this place which has got a small white dog and a cross Ridgeback.
    When we go past the dogs stop short of it so they must have had a few zaps and remembered.
    I don't think they put it there to protect the garden beds but more to stop the dogs getting close to the high school kids as they go past.
    I would think that they have been harassed by the kids.
    So they came up with this solutution. And I can say these two dogs stay away from it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    12,581

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    I know people who have used the invisible fence successfully.

    You can't just rig the wire and stick an electric collar on the dog though - you have to train the dog what to do when it gets zapped ie come back - not blast out. The fence comes with appropriate instructions if you follow them, it will probably work, if you don't then the invisble fence won't work.

    It is illegal under the animal welfare acts in several states - to put a collar on an animal that may zap it, but this is a law that doesn't seem to get enforced much if at all. But if you do go this way - it may be best not to talk about it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    808

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    My ex house mates installed an electric fence for their GSD x husky. Nil problem what so ever. I personally will go for crating than the electric fence though...
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
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    I wouldn't go for the 'invisible' fence if I were you. Just get some electric wire, attached to a battery and run one line near the top of the fence, and another near the bottom to sop the dog from jumping as well as digging their way out. They use these a lot for cattle, horses and sheep. I have heard that this works for most people. One or two zaps and thats enough for them. Obviously I would do the research as well, making sure you can turn the voltage up or down
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." - Edward Hoagland

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

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    We have a hot wire along the top of our fence (rural fencing).

    Next door is currently installing a hot wire top and bottom as their Siberians are escape artists.

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