Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 40

Thread: How to Deal with Dog Aggressive Dogs - and Their Owners

  1. #21

    Default

    That to me sound fair enough.
    I also live in a small town and it is almost impossible to walk your dog without being confronted by another dog.
    Most times they come out barking like I want to rip your dogs thoat out, but then retreat back into their own yards.
    I have found it a better idea to try your best to talk to the owners and sometimes they have no idae that their dog is getting out.
    Here it is law that your dog must at all times be on a leash with in the public arena.
    This I think is a real good law and I follow it when I was walkingour old dog which we no long have with us.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rid**** View Post
    Most times they come out barking like I want to rip your dogs thoat out, but then retreat back into their own yards.
    Hehehe... yes. We have quite a few of those as well A kelpie from down the road is screaming murder every single time we're walking past. He usually follows us a bit down the road where two of his mates are living. Two blue heelers in a (well fenced) property. Then the three of them are sitting on each side of the fence growling and grumbling like three old grumpy men having a yarn about 'these bloody kids nowadays'.

    The most notorious is a white fluffy thing though. He is small enough to crawl out under the gate and often follows us, barking madly, until we're almost home. A few times I noticed that the poor thing had pink nail polish on his claws. No wonder he is always in such a foul mood He is probably being teased by every single tough Staffy and Heeler in the neighbourhood...

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sunshine coast Qld
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    A long time ago, I rescued a beautiful golden labrador, she was my childrens best friend and followed them everywhere. One day, while walking down the road, (our dog had a leash on) a rottweiler ran at us from a house and attacked her. My daughter and I were both bitten trying to save our dog and i had to pick up a large branch and almost stab the dog before he left us alone. Anyway she was ok except for a few small puncture wounds and our bites were minimal and healed, but our dog never got over it!

    We live in an area where we have off leash dog beaches and dog park areas beside the river we used to frequent with our dogs everyday. But from that day on, she tried to attack every dog she saw, she was tormented. I went with her for walks everyday but could never let her off leash, had a dog trainer as a mentor for months...to no avail.

    She was never able to enjoy being out off leash ever again! It seemed to change her from a stable happy friendly dog, to an ever watchful tormented one...very sad!
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    743

    Default

    Can someone explain to me please 'the joy of being off leash'?

    Yes, I take my dogs regularly to a fenced oval to 'free run', so I understand the concept of freedom to blow off steam... Especially for my Flirtt who could possibly be the first racing Dober-greyhound ever... But, exactly what value is there for a dog to be walked off leash?

    The owner releases the leash, and, in the vast majority of cases then relinquishes control. The dog positively does not have his mind or body better exercised off leash (and here I exclude training sessions done off leash or on long line), and the danger to the dog of accidental injury is increased.

    Is it too hard to hold a leash? IMHO a dog who has the capacity to walk well off leash can be no harder to walk with one on, surely? A dog who pulls relentlessly (again IMO) is NOT a suitable candidate for lesser control.

    Are leashes that expensive nowadays?

    I think I am one of a dwindling minority who leashes [her] dogs and endeavours to cover mental as well as physical stimulation. And I positively do not believe that a dog handled well on lead is of any disadvantage to one off leash. More advantaged, actually.

    So, clearly, I don't 'get it'....

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sunshine coast Qld
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    Can someone explain to me please 'the joy of being off leash'?

    Yes, I take my dogs regularly to a fenced oval to 'free run', so I understand the concept of freedom to blow off steam... Especially for my Flirtt who could possibly be the first racing Dober-greyhound ever... But, exactly what value is there for a dog to be walked off leash?

    The owner releases the leash, and, in the vast majority of cases then relinquishes control. The dog positively does not have his mind or body better exercised off leash (and here I exclude training sessions done off leash or on long line), and the danger to the dog of accidental injury is increased.

    Is it too hard to hold a leash? IMHO a dog who has the capacity to walk well off leash can be no harder to walk with one on, surely? A dog who pulls relentlessly (again IMO) is NOT a suitable candidate for lesser control.

    Are leashes that expensive nowadays?

    I think I am one of a dwindling minority who leashes [her] dogs and endeavours to cover mental as well as physical stimulation. And I positively do not believe that a dog handled well on lead is of any disadvantage to one off leash. More advantaged, actually.

    So, clearly, I don't 'get it'....
    Hi villian, yep, I am a self confessed addict of off lead . After you asked that question, I couldnt really think of WHY I like it so much . I guess because dogs mostly live in the same old boring environment and while I mostly use a lead, I live in a place where there are many safe off lead areas. "safe" being the operative word as my girls have no road sense at all..so just always seems a good idea at the time
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    743

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cavalierqld View Post
    Hi villian, yep, I am a self confessed addict of off lead . After you asked that question, I couldnt really think of WHY I like it so much . I guess because dogs mostly live in the same old boring environment and while I mostly use a lead, I live in a place where there are many safe off lead areas. "safe" being the operative word as my girls have no road sense at all..so just always seems a good idea at the time

    Until something unexpected occurs.... Which is where this thread started. Cars aren't the only danger to dogs. I'd love to see more people use long lines- the dogs can go further, explore, sniff, enjoy... And still be under the handler's control. Of course, to use a long line takes a little practice, I do understand that.

    I was going to say 'I don't mean to be judgmental'... But I suppose in all honesty, yes, I do mean to be. It's no good crying foul after something happens. Prevention is easier, and delivers better outcomes. If I am judgmental, it comes from my passion for the welfare of dogs.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Hmmm I dunno about that control thing V&F

    To be honest, Barney is terrible on lead. He pulls and pulls, and pretty much attempts ot drag me wherever he feelslike going.

    However, off lead he will walk nicely and heel the minute you tell him to. The only time he wouldnt, would be if he saw another dog. Which is why he is never walked anywhere off lead ....generally

    He did grow up off lead though at parks and beaches and rivers in NZ so I suspect that has something to do with a walk being more pleasant off lead and him being more "behaved".

    If I say 'heel' or 'here' off lead, he is immediately into a heel and will stay until released. If I say it on lead he will heel for about 2 seconds and then he is straight back out to the end of th elead again.

    I will admit it is weird. I dont know why he should be like this really as one would generally assume, crap on lead = crap off lead

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    middle of nowhere
    Posts
    310

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    Hmmm I dunno about that control thing V&F

    To be honest, Barney is terrible on lead. He pulls and pulls, and pretty much attempts ot drag me wherever he feelslike going.

    However, off lead he will walk nicely and heel the minute you tell him to. The only time he wouldnt, would be if he saw another dog. Which is why he is never walked anywhere off lead ....generally

    He did grow up off lead though at parks and beaches and rivers in NZ so I suspect that has something to do with a walk being more pleasant off lead and him being more "behaved".

    If I say 'heel' or 'here' off lead, he is immediately into a heel and will stay until released. If I say it on lead he will heel for about 2 seconds and then he is straight back out to the end of th elead again.

    I will admit it is weird. I dont know why he should be like this really as one would generally assume, crap on lead = crap off lead
    my dog is exactly the same, but also like yours, when he sees a dog he will lose his mind so I will never walk him off leash around here, some times I will go for a drive out to the bush or something where there is definately no one around and he is fine, he needs this as he is a runner and there is no way I could excercise him properly unless I did this or took him to a fenced dog park(which we also frequent)

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    945

    Default

    Why off lead? Ehm... Well I'm also not so sure about why exactly. I'm well aware that there is always a risk letting your dog off lead.

    I don't walk my dog off leash in an unknown area. Thanks to Leslie Nelson his recall improves steadily but he is still a young dog and if something really interesting appears on the horizon he'll be gone. In known areas I leash him when we enter a 'danger zone', e.g. another dog in the area, a chicken run or a duck pond (far too tempting) or a road,...etc. I also tend to leash him more frequently in the summer because of snakes.

    I want him to be able to run and explore while I go for a run myself (or hunt delicious fungi). And most importantly for him I guess, to go for a swim. Or two. Or many. To be honest I have not tried a long rope but I can well envision us wrapped around all those pine trees The only absolutely safe and fenced place in our area, with no other dogs and no distractions is our own backyard and I actually don't think that would be enough for him.

    So I take him for runs in areas where I am sure enough that there are no other dogs around (or at least I know the dogs like in our reserves). And where are no roads or livestock. I would also not take him to national or conservation parks where dogs are prohibited to protect the wildlife. I'm lucky enough to live in an area where I don't have to go far to find such places. So if he sees a rabbit and runs after it so what. He tries, figures he has no chance and comes back within a few seconds. I am hopeful that one day, when we are done with Leslie Nelson, even this will be a thing of the past

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    My dogs are only off lead at our River walks. Which are so far out on dirt tracks no one else is there with dogs. If a car comes with dogs (rarely) ours are back in the car or on lead.....If they are known people/dogs they can be off lead again.
    I do walk one of my dogs off lead in one of our small towns, sometimes. But it is heeling training. And she is more in control off lead, then some dogs are on. And it is only for very short training periods 5-10min. And I am very aware of our environment during that period. Our dogs also have an good recall and "wait". "wait" stops them even if they start chasing a rabbit (all except for Lukey, he is still training)
    But I do remember the good old days in small towns with less traffic and mayhem, where we all just had our dogs tagging along. But I suppose every dog did that from puppyhood and it just happened.
    I can not tolerate pulling on lead, but maybe that is because my dogs are so large. If they pulled I would be flat on my face. So I have O tolerance for that.......And they know.
    I do like long lines on controlled dogs, but those out of control little or large dogs on long lines are a menace....I have had one tangled up in my cart shafts and dog harness at Million Paws.....With a dumb owner at the end who had no idea, his staffy was tangled up
    Pets are forever

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •