Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Abbie's Home :)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    256

    Default Abbie's Home :)

    We picked up our new 6 month old pointer puppy on the weekend I think both my OH and i really underestimated just how much work it is going to be! She's a very quiet girl and our other dog Buckley is the complete opposite. They seem to get along fine but we're having a lot of trouble keeping Buckley in line. He jumps on/pushes/bites her anytime they're not sleeping. He doesn't let her have any toys and we have to psychically restrain him when we feed them because he will push her out of the way to get her food. Yesterday we gave them a bone each and he took the both of them and she just walked away disinterested. I find the problem is that she doesn't stick up for herself (although i have noticed on a few occasions that Abbie has gone up to Buckley and stirred him up) and Buckley doesn't know when enough is enough. She growls and snaps at Buckley but he ignores it. Our only savour at the moment is the water spray bottle. We call it Buckley Repellant.

    Has anyone been through anything similar..? I know Abbie is still settling in but i really need to get this sorted. Is it too soon to be thinking about getting a dog trainer in?

    I go back to work on wednesday but i really don't feel comfortable leaving them together so i'm not sure what i'm going to do there. I can only think of leaving her crated all day but that seems so cruel.

    Anyway here's some photos of the terrible two!



    Last edited by tiff-689; 07-11-2011 at 09:40 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    When we brought Ruby home, which was already owned by a Foxy x Jack Russel (something like that anyway) Anyway, he is naturally a old grumpy soul. Very much a Lap dog with very little patience for rough, annoying Bulldogs with sharp teeth and Big paws.

    There was many growls and nips from both ends and a few time outs for both parties.

    We just let Ruby find her place and let patches settle back into his. Now they are best friends

    If you are worried, also if its possible, section off a part of the house with a baby gate to separate the two while you are not there to supervise. Or have one inside and one outside, or if you have a MIL that doesnt work maybe they can baby sit for the day.

    PS Forgot to add, she is absolutely georgeous!! Totally Kissable hehe
    Rubylisious


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    256

    Default

    funny you mention the MIL. she's offered to babysit sit them wednesday and thursday. then my partner is taking friday off. that's this week covered. fingers crossed we're as good as gold by next monday. as i write this, they're cuddled up together in front of the heater

  4. #4

    Default

    You need to make sure they are both spending time alone ie: that they do not spend all their time together otherwise you may find you have two bogs deeply bonded to each other and not to you and you may end up with serious separation anxiety issues. You need to be number 1 in both the dogs minds so start enforcing separate training, separate walks, separate nap times etc.

    Do not feed the dogs together. This can cause food aggression issues. The Pointer may do nothing right now but as she ages she may start defending her food and it could turn quite nasty. I would be feeding one at a time ie: with other dog crated, or both fed in their crates, if you don't crate then separate them with a baby gate/door and feed separately that way.

    You need to act as if each dog is an ONLY dog for a while so that you can develop the right bond with them. It is not healthy for dogs to be overly dependent on each other. If you want to see what can happen if not managed correctly head over to the other forum there is currently a thread in general about a Mal puppy and Lab, it is currently on page 2.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    745

    Default

    It's only been a few days so hopefully things will settle down.

    I also think your first dog realises that the newcomer is going to be quite a bit bigger than himself and is overcompensating on putting the puppy in it's place.

    Often some of this over the top behaviour only presents itself in the owners presence. If you can observe them from a window when they are outside you could possibly see if the behaviour is ongoing when you are not around.

    I always up the exercise on the older dogs when a new dog enters the house, just takes the edge off them and is also good training for puppy to be left home alone.

    But of course you are the one that's there and only you can decide if the behaviour is a bit too much for the new puppy and they need to be separated.

    We have a puppy yard here built from star pickets and mesh. Once they have grown it's removed and after a couple of weeks you would never know it was there. It's a bit of a eyesore for a couple of months but means I can go out and not worry about the little ones.

  6. #6

    Default

    We had a cross Westie and when we bought home Lacey, a Red Heeler it was all okay for a minute.
    Even as a pup Lacey would not take that backwards step. Bundy on the odd accassion would put Lacey in her placem while she was smaller than her.
    Then Lacey grew and she was now the alpha dog. And yes you guessed it Bundy was having nothing of it. She wanted to be, and in her mind she was, but she never had the right equipment to handle a full sized Heeler.
    So the odd fight would break out and I would always have to pull Lacey off from Bundy.
    We were lucky as Bundy never got her skin broken, I think if it did we would of had way more trouble.
    These fights would happen about once every 6 months or so and we sort of could read the girls minds and kept them separated when we thought it was going to happen.
    A few times I had to run outside to save Bundy, and there was no reason why these happened they just did.
    Normally things were real good between them, and the bone issue, we had that one to.

    Lacey would go and bark at Bundy until she walked away from her bone. We knew the bark and as soon as Lacey had the bone I would march outside and tell her thank you and I would be given a bone who's I am not to sure of but it was always the one with the least ampount of meat on it. I then would call Bundy out of the kennel and give her back the bone. And Lacy would not even go near that bone again.
    So yer thay had the little tiffs that could have got nasty so just watch them until you see some little trigger that you have not seen before and I would say you could get through this real soon.
    Oh we say thank you to all our dogs when we want something that they have.
    I know is sounds a little strage but it works for us.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    If she is submissive, then you may not be able to resolve it. That is the way the animals kingdom works. There is no sense of 'fairness'.

    However, after re-homing quite a few dogs and having rescues here, I can assure you that her behaviour will not be true to form for up to 3 months. We had submissive dogs gradually show their more dominant sides as time went on and dominant dogs settle and become more submissive with time. The average, in my opinion, to be able to accurately determine the personality and how exactly they fit into the new home was 3 months with Pugs.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    256

    Default

    thank you all for the advice! i've started feeding them separately and have noticed buckley has slowed down his eating without her around. Only problem being that he always finishes first and will make a hell of a racket until he's allowed to be near her again.

    One of two things happens when i leave them outside on their own..they carry on wrestling and biting each other, not even noticing i've left or they see me walk inside and they immediately stop and wait by the door calmly until i let them in.

    Before we brought Abbie home, the breeder said to us, "i can almost guarantee that she will be the top dog in your home" She is still very quiet and submissive to him at the moment but i have noticed in the past few days that she has picked the fight with Buckley and jumped on him when he's resting.

    It does concern me that Buckley will, majority of the time, completely ignore my partner and i when we call him because he's too busy watching or annoying Abbie. I'm not sure if this is just because she's still the 'shiny new toy' though. The only time he seems to come bounding towards us is when we have food or have arrived home from somewhere. Is this something that's likely to settle with time?

  9. #9

    Default

    Glad to hear you are feeding separately. With Buckley, ignore his carrying on, do not let him get back to Abbie until he has calmed down. If he carries on and you let him get to Abbie to stop his carry on you are rewarding his bad behaviour. If you make him wait until he is quiet he will quickly learn he has to be quiet and calm to get to Abbie.

    I had a foster puppy in my house for a couple weeks. And my younger dog Phi (10 months) was a bit like that with him ie: wanted to play all the time, I think it does come from being a bit excited about the new dog.

    Again you need to enforce separate time for them. Ie: they need to spend time apart and you need to spend time with them individually so you become their main focus ie: you can tell them to stop playing when required. If you allow them to ignore you to keep playing you are setting a precedent. They also need to grow up independent of each other.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    5,967

    Default

    I have an opposite view on some things. I have introduced other dogs/cats into the mix here over the years.

    I let them sort it. I feel that a dog has to learn their place (whatever that one will be) I do not believe in jumping in to sort out any or every perceived problems for them. A bit like bickering kids, if they do not learn to problem solve they go through life expecting people to sort things for them.

    Of course I would feed separately if there was a problem and try and fix any serious stuff that might lead to injury. I have never had dogs that focused on each other more than on the humans. Not even the 2 littermates I kept do this.

    We aim to fit them in with our family, environment whilst also incorporating what their needs are.

    There is always an initial time of uncertainty with hopefully little interference from the humans and it all sorts out in time.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •