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Thread: What Can I Expect

  1. #1

    Default What Can I Expect

    This is a very valid question as I have never had any pet that has never been desexed.
    I am thinking that Murphy might be a real good one to use as a breeder with the right female. But I have never had a dog entire so I don't know what to look out for as he ages.
    And to what his behaviour is going to be like.
    I have heard that some boys get agressive and some are always at it on anyones leg they can latch onto.
    I, and if it works out to be okay to keep him entire and we find the right mate for him what would I be in for.
    And again I have hear talk that you can have the pick of the litter or you get a fee for his services.

  2. #2
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    So I am assuming that you have papers for Murphy?

    Are you going to become AKC registered?

    I would start off by going to his breeder. They should be able to tell you everything you need to know and what to look out for in regards to conformation, a compatible bitch and health issues.

    I dont really know much about cattle dogs to be honest, but I guess its probably a bit different if you are breeding him for working. Then maybe conformation isnt as important but ability will be.

  3. #3

    Default

    We don't have his papers but we have a full knowledgeof his history. which does go back a real long way.
    We would only breed with him to another full blood who also knows the full history.
    And no matter what we breed the pups for I sort of can garentee that the pups will be great pets or working dogs.
    you shold see Murphy with the cat he has already worked out that if he goes this way he can cut her off. So yer this is well ingrained in their mind even as youngens.

  4. #4
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    central coast nsw
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    oh no..... runaway...

  5. #5
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    You really can expect no help or advice on this from most of the people here as you will be back yard breeding and possibly adding to the over crowded shelters. Whilst there may be homes for these puppes that are produced what about if they produce puppies as well.


    No doubt Hy will be in to do her wonderful post that she usually does in these threads.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #6
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    Rid****

    If I remember right - you have a gorgeous ACD puppy? Given he's not registered with ANKC, ideally you would find the working line club for ACD. This club could help you decide if your dog is an ideal candidate for breeding and hook you up with the owner of a suitable female.

    cattledogclubvic
    They may also tell you that with out rego with ANKC that they would not be interested and then you're on your own. Which is a bit sad. I guess it depends on whether you can trace your puppy's ancestry back to ANKC dogs on all sides and still get him registered.

    He might be perfect for breeding from. Or not. What the owner of the right female should be looking for (and so should you when choosing the right female...) is excellent and compatible health in both dogs and their parents. Ie none of the genetic problems that go with ACD or at least not in both parents - or it's sure to come out in the puppies.

    http://www.dogforum.com.au/general-d...you-breed.html

    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    So you want to be a breeder?

    Database of genetic disorders that ACD carry
    Disorders by Breed - Australian cattle dog - LIDA Dogs - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

    If you do decide to keep his nuts on - you risk him getting all sorts of diseases associated with carrying them like testicular cancer.

  7. #7
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    Agree about testicular cancer. My old blue heeler (RIP) was diagnosed and operated on for it at age 10. We got it all and he lived to 14.

    Bandit, my blueheeler x mutt will be done at some stage.
    All females here are desexed.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  8. #8
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    Yeah the last ACD I shared a house with died from complications of his balls, including testicular cancer. It was sad at the end. I guess it always is.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rid**** View Post
    This is a very valid question as I have never had any pet that has never been desexed.
    I am thinking that Murphy might be a real good one to use as a breeder with the right female. But I have never had a dog entire so I don't know what to look out for as he ages.
    And to what his behaviour is going to be like.
    I have heard that some boys get agressive and some are always at it on anyones leg they can latch onto.
    I, and if it works out to be okay to keep him entire and we find the right mate for him what would I be in for.
    And again I have hear talk that you can have the pick of the litter or you get a fee for his services.
    I will only give you some advice on the behaviour aspect, as not going to get into the breeding issue, as I am totally opposed to back yard breeders (BYB) and puppy farmers and breeding of dogs should be left to the registered, ethical breeders only

    I have a 22month old pure black black male labrador who is registered with ANKC (on a "Limited Register) who is still intact (not desexed/neutred) and the reason I primarily left him intact was so that he would develop orthopaedically correct and to the male lab standard with his growth plates closing at the appropriate time around the 14month mark. In addition to proper bone growth and physical development, there are also longer term health benefits to leaving large and giant breeds intact for longer as they are more susceptible to cancers like Osteosarcoma, Hemangiosarcoma etc as well as being susceptible to other cancers and orthopaedic disorders which delayed or no desexing/neutering can help protect them from.

    I was initially going to have my boy neutered around 18-24month mark, as by then he would have developed sufficiently and his growth plates closed and received the additional protection for longer term health benefits, but my boy is so beautifully behaved and doesn't have a dominant bone in his beautiful body that I am considering holding off the neutering.

    You will always hear the negative side to intact males i.e. they are dominant, they are aggressive, they hump everything in sight, they mark everything etc etc etc. Well I can tell you that out of those 4 common things I have listged, above, my intact boy only does 1, which is marking, but only marking trees and bushes, never has marked inside or anything other than trees/bushes outside. Like most things, don't believe everything you hear about intact males, it simply does NOT apply to all intact males and whilst some will display some undesired behaviours, others may one or two or even none of the undesired behavious that intact males are often, incorrectly, renowned for.

    If my boy had displayed any undesirable behaviours that I could not control and neglected to fix then I would have seriously considered neutering him at that point. However, I knew my boy was not a dominant boy and certainly not aggressive as he has a too die for temperament and comes from excellent lines that are renowned for their fabulous temperament and physical condition in meeting the Lab standard, hence why I got him from that particular Lab breeder. Anyway I have found more aggressive and dominant netured/desexed dogs than the other way around.

    I don't know what breed, size or how old your dog is, but you should probably know your dog by now to know how he behaves with you/your family and other dogs and whilst there will be changes as they go from puppyhood into adolescence, you can address any changes in behaviour without having to neuter/desex your dog before you want to. There is too much emphasis and incorrectly in my opinion, that neutering/desexing will fix ALL the behaviour issues with an intact male as this is simply NOT true.

    I did a lot of research on pros and cons of neutering/desexing in preparation for my new pup in light of losing my 10year old Lab boy to Hemangiosarcoma Cancer and he was netured at 8months of age and my other Labs have all been netured/desexed before 12months. I am firmly NOT in the camp that all dogs should be netured/desexed and it is up to each dog owner to evaluate pros and cons of neutering/desexing and equally as importantly, they must be very responsible about and know how to manage intact dogs around undesexed females and and containing and preventing access to undesexed females. Unfortunately, there are too many irresponsible dog owners out there who do not manage intact/undesexed dogs/bitches properly and these people should not have have intact/undesexed dogs.

    Anyway checkout this link, you should find it useful http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/longt...uterindogs.pdf

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    I also do not like and disagree with BYB............Unless excellent proven work lines, I personally would like all dogs to be registered and health checked before breeding.

    And to me the Health and character testing is so very important.

    I also have a non-neutered male. he is health checked, hip/elbow scored and now with us to see what his character is like.

    We have no issues with a four year old non-neutered dog, but there are many responsibilities. We are responsible for him not to be out and about and to how he behaves in public. Lukey is very well mannered and now very well socialised and being Obedience trained. We also show him and he is doing well in the show ring amongst his peers. He was rescued by his Breeder and led a less then perfect life, but has still managed to be a happy friendly non aggressive dog.

    So there is a possibility that he might be bred. But this will be done by his Breeder. And all the choices will be hers and she does have a lot of breeding experience.

    I think there are plenty of dogs bred and plenty of dogs who were born that now have no home and are sadly PTS

    An article I spotted Don't litter: Get your dog desexed | Adelaide Now
    Pets are forever

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