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Thread: My MaltiPoo is Showing Agression Towards My Wife!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Unhappy My MaltiPoo is Showing Agression Towards My Wife!

    OK, this guy is the most loyal dog a "Dad" could ever want and of course I have spoilt him rotten and he is my virtual shadow - yep, in the loo also - and no matter where I move he is right behind me.

    As a retired man I love his companionship and spend many hours just playing with him, walking him and doing the things you do with a great dog mate.

    Alas, my lovely wife has never had her own pet - other than all of mine - in her life and is not a dog lover though she does feel for this little fella and worries over him (occasionally), feeds him and on the very (very) rare occasion will grace him with a pat.

    Typical of a dog he loves her to death and makes a tremendous fuss over her whenever he sees her, loves his half-second pat and of course she is probably more correct in this treatment than I am........... being to treat him like a dog and not a human!

    To the problem, if one of his toys is on the floor and she goes to pick it up he will leap up, growl and jump at her in very aggressive manner. No, he has never bitten her or even snapped at her but I worry that at two years of age he may be starting to develop a very unwanted attitude.

    With my grandson he occasionally does the same. If we three (four) are all sitting down quietly watching the idiot box and either one of them gets up suddenly he will leap up and go through this behaviour.

    I have suggested to her that were she to toss his toy to him now and then or say something to him before jumping up, simply to alert him, this might alleviate the problem but as day's end I guess I am the culprit and if so, what should I do to remedy it?

    He is very defensive of me and if someone even jokingly slaps my arm or leg he starts getting quite upset over it ...............

    Thanks

  2. #2

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    I would get a dog behaviourlist in ASAP. His behaviour needs to be sorted NOW. He sounds like a disaster waiting to happen.

  3. #3

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    Your dog does this because he is toy guarding, probably developed because your wife would take toys away from him while he was growing up. You should never just snatch a toy away from a dog it can create issues such as the one you have. It is a pretty regular problem to have with dogs and blaming yourself or your wife isn't going to fix it.

    To remedy I would suggest the next time she wants to take a toy from him that she has a very high value treat with her and to "swap" that for the toy. Otherwise I would advice she just doesn't go near his toys.

    I have been told of a dog whose owners would take things straight out of his mouth so it got to a point that one day when he had a mitten in his mouth as the owner walked over to see what it was the dog swallowed it whole to stop the owner from taking it from him!

    As your dog has reached maturity (around 2 years old) that is why this behavior has become more pronounced now and it will be harder to remedy as he is older and it is harder to break bad behaviors once they reach this age.

    Personally as he is also snapping at your grand kids, I would be getting a behavioural trainer in to assess him and the situation and give you advice on what to do to fix it.

  4. #4
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    I keep my dogs away from the grandies when they visit as it would only take one snap to inflict damage and I will not take the chance.

    Agree with the advice on trading a toy for a treat. You will make no progress though if your wife dows not do things consistantly.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  5. #5
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    It sounds like pup has decided they're number 2!

    My dog used to dislike the kids running (three year old boy mostly). She would chase, bite and drew blood on two occasions. She has a high prey drive, like most terriers, and this contributed greatly.

    There is a system out there called Nothing In Life Is Free, and it worked for us in conjunction with obedience training. I kid you not, in about a week of me going implementing these guidelines, I saw a change in the dog. I have a great flyer on it somewhere, but I can find some information and email you some links if you like (try this for a start Nothing in Life is Free ).

    The basics are that dogs are pack animals. They have a rank and each has a certain responsibility. Dogs who are treated as kings (alpha's, number ones) that aren't equipped to handle it sort of lose the plot. They're stressed. They snap. It's like putting a graduate in the CEO's position.

    NILIF means that the dog is pushed to the lower ranks. YOU control the attention given to them, when YOU want. He needs to work for what he wants also. Sit before dinner is given. Sit before pats are given. It doesn't mean a lack of affection, or less affection than you're currently giving him, it's just in a controlled manner. Your wife will need to follow these rules as well. It only works if everyone contributes and is committed, like DiDee says.

    As for him jumping up when your wife or grandson does, I wonder if it's his eyesight also? It sounds like he's saying, 'I didn't tell you you could leave', but he also might genuinely be startled by them.

    Behaviour therapists are great, but they are expensive, and I could understand not being able to rush out and see one. I'm not recommending that you try to fix this all by yourself. You will need guidance and help from someone with training and experience at some point. In my experience, going to classes regularly and asking trainers there about behaviour was more beneficial than individual sessions. If you can't do it tomorrow though, don't stress. You could ring local obedience schools, explain what is going on and see what they recommend as a training options. Ask them if there is anything you can be doing now to help stop this behaviour. You don't have to jump right in, speak to as many as you can. There are so many different training methods out there, it took me awhile to figure out where I sat on the scale, because you need to be trained too

    Please remember that this is manageable. My dog bit my nephew. That's a pretty bad situation, and most people freak out and think that the dog is awful and I'm a terrible owner. I also got big lectures and was told to spend ridiculous amounts of money I didn't have on her. Not to mention the guilt trips of how horrible my dog was and how she could never be changed (and this was actually from a trainer! I didn't go with that company). She is now in the masterclass of obedience school, just graduated out of the lower levels. My nephew lives with us, is four and she has never chased, bitten or growled at him.

    You can curb this behaviour now, it's do-able. It might be hard, but you CAN manage this and turn your pup into a reputable member of doggie (and human) society

  6. #6
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    Jul 2011
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    Red face Thanks for replies folks!

    Much appreciated though I guess I should reiterate that I feel I have caused the problem making "him and I" such close friends as he sees everything as being part of our little domain and that includes his toys and even our all being together.

    Anything that suddenly interrupts that atmosphere he reacts to in this manner.

    Since my first post I did take the given advice suggesting my wife give him a small treat before she makes a move towards his toy or plaything and it certainly worked well!

    Likewise she just gets his attention before leaving her chair suddenly and again that has calmed him down quite a lot.

    I certainly don't intend for him to run the house wherein we grovel to his every wish but at least he has already responded positively to a minimal amount of changes as above.

    Thanks all

  7. #7
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    Really you should never just take a toy off a dog?

    Hmmm, I dont know if that's the issue to be honest. I dont think that it was necessarily caused by the wife taking toys off him growing up...and making that assumption is weird anyway seeing as the OP never mentioned it.

    I am not sure I agree with the "lower than you" type thinking either to be honest.

    I take toys off my dogs, in fact, I take food off them too. I just take it and they deal with it LOL. They dont get a treat or anything....

    I cant really help OP but you will get lots of advice on here and some of it quite different so my advice is to perhaps try the ones you will be able to implement and stick to. Multiple strategies can work for the same problem and its about picking the strategy that works for oyu guys.

  8. #8
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    I think that's the point Lala, there are so many different methods and schools of thought, you just need to find one that works for you.

    Cuttlefish, I used to feel exactly the same way. My dog was a timid, scared of her own shadow mess when we rescued her. I spent a whole year building her confidence and she turned into a monster!!

    My trainer has a dog who has separation anxiety. Another who pulls on the lead. Mine barks when she see's other dogs. Some dogs hump. None of them are perfect, and they all have different personalities and quirks. You're a good dog owner for giving him a great life, loving him, and most of all being responsible by realising there is a problem and trying to fix it

  9. #9
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    Ok someone has to tell me what breed of dog this is? lol
    Rubylisious


  10. #10
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    Mar 2010
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    Melbourne
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    Maltese x poodle?

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