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Thread: What is It Like Moving Countries with a Dog?

  1. #1

    Default What is It Like Moving Countries with a Dog?

    Another thread spurred me to ask (regarding pet transport) does anyone know what it is like to move countries with their dog?

    I know certain opportunities will be available to me in the next year or so if I stay with my current company which include me moving to the US or UK. Has anyone made this move? How does the dog cope? Is it selfish of me wanting to take him?

    I know a lot of people rehome their pets rather than take them - but my preference would be to take him.
    Last edited by michelle89; 06-23-2011 at 08:15 AM. Reason: Ended up with a smiley face rather than text by mistake.

  2. #2

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    I have not moved Countries with dogs but if you go on the British Expats website there will be people that have done it.There is a back to UK and a US forum and if you ask a question I am sure people will help you(you don't have to be a Brit!)Good luck.

  3. #3
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    We have moved with dogs from country to country in the past. the UK and US are good. But you have to realize there are many diseases there that we do not have here, or at least not as frequently. Especially Rabies in the USA and Lyme disease, very common East-side USA and many other parts.
    The hard part is when you want to come back, because of Quarantine into Australia. Just make sure you keep a very exact medical and vaccination and worming passport of your dogs. It will make it so much easier when you want to come back.
    Also I was amazed at where you can take dogs in the USA. We were able to take our large dogs into motes/hotels/into lifts and all sort of places. Not like here where everyone wants dogs left outside public places. Dogs are much more inside in both the UK and US. I found it great
    Pets are forever

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    But you have to realize there are many diseases there that we do not have here, or at least not as frequently. Especially Rabies in the USA and Lyme disease, very common East-side USA and many other parts.
    The hard part is when you want to come back, because of Quarantine into Australia. Just make sure you keep a very exact medical and vaccination and worming passport of your dogs. It will make it so much easier when you want to come back.
    True, the U.S. does have rabies and lyme disease. BUT, I would hardly call them common, let alone "very common." I lived in the U.S., in the mid-Atlantic region of the East Coast, for 30 years and my dogs never got rabies or lyme disease. Actually, I don't even know of any dogs who got rabies or lyme disease. Every 3-5 years you might hear of a case on the news, but that's it. In the U.S. dogs are required to have rabies vaccinations once a year so there is no issue.

    To be on the safe side, see if you can get your dog vaccinated against rabies before leaving Australia. Also, make sure your dog is microchipped before leaving Australia. Australian quarantine won't allow a non-microchipped dog to go through. There is a 6 month quarantine period when going from the U.S. to Australia; however, 3 of the 6 months can take place while the dog is with you in the U.S. (you just need regular vet appointments and blood work done). Moving a dog from the U.S. to Australia costs $8 - $10K.

    Hope that helps a bit

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the replies.

    I guess I am just starting to hunt for facts as nothing is confirmed just yet.

    I love the idea of dogs being allowed inside more Newfie - I bet it would be a welcome change for you! I can sneak Johnny around in my handbag.

    And Johnny is mircochipped so that's not an issue. But what is it like for dogs being quarantined when they come back? Is it all tiny cages and no visiting?

  6. #6

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    Quarantine looks much like a boarding kennel.
    You are allowed to visit the dogs on certain days and go in for grooming.

    It's a stressful time for them sure, but it's a small price to pay to have your best friend with you.

  7. #7
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    I brought my dogs to Australia with me, but only from NZ so there was no quarantine or anything.

    Our friends who are dutch took their dog to NZ and she went into quarantine. They went to visit her once in the few months she was there and it stressed her out so much they didnt visit her again. Their dog is very very attached (they cannot have children) so they have said they will never put her through that again. When she went into quarantine she was a nice red viszla, and when she came out her whole face was grey.

    She is very clingy and needy to her owners though so not all dogs are going to be like that.

    If I ever move to another country, my dogs will definitely be coming with me.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glitter009 View Post
    True, the U.S. does have rabies and lyme disease. BUT, I would hardly call them common, let alone "very common." I lived in the U.S., in the mid-Atlantic region of the East Coast, for 30 years and my dogs never got rabies or lyme disease. Actually, I don't even know of any dogs who got rabies or lyme disease. Every 3-5 years you might hear of a case on the news, but that's it. In the U.S. dogs are required to have rabies vaccinations once a year so there is no issue.

    To be on the safe side, see if you can get your dog vaccinated against rabies before leaving Australia. Also, make sure your dog is microchipped before leaving Australia. Australian quarantine won't allow a non-microchipped dog to go through. There is a 6 month quarantine period when going from the U.S. to Australia; however, 3 of the 6 months can take place while the dog is with you in the U.S. (you just need regular vet appointments and blood work done). Moving a dog from the U.S. to Australia costs $8 - $10K.

    Hope that helps a bit
    Yes I know, I should have said the dogs are vaccinated to prevent rabies, just advicing if people are not aware. I lived most of my life to and fro to the USA, except for the last years.....But I do know of friends, especially in the southern region who do have dogs that get lyme disease and it is not that rare.
    Pets are forever

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