Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Rescued Doggie

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    39

    Default Rescued Doggie

    Hi guys,

    It's been a while since I've been on the forum. Two dogs (red heeler & a mastiff x ridgeback x great dane), 7 ferrets, and 2 kids (with another on the way) to keep me busy

    Over the weekend we went to the Animal Welfare League with the intention of rescuing a dog. We have a 3 dog permit from council and a ranger came out to inspect our home and property, and as a stay at home mum who absolutely loves animals I can easily make time for another furry friend.

    We saw this sweet little brindle dog and absolutely fell in love with her. The AWL thinks she is a 9 month old staffy cross. She's much smaller than an English or American Staffy and I've been thinking about what she's crossed with. I'm thinking maybe a Boston terrier or French bulldog (check out the size of her ears!). What do you guys think?

    She gets along beautifully with our other two dogs. They absolutely love playing together. She's been great on walks, in fact I have to keep checking that she's still attached to the leash because she doesn't pull at all and just happily walks right next to me. She's learning sit and stay, we'll go to our first dog training class on Sunday. I've also made it a point to touch her all over, especially paws and gums so that grooming and vets visits are drama free. She's also really responsive when I say "no" and she really looks like she wants to please us. She's fantastic with the kids (ages 5 and 7) and just an all around sweetheart.

    I've had dogs my whole life, but never a rescue. I'm guessing there might be some things that are a bit different with a rescued dog at first so any insight would be great! She pigs down her food like crazy, so I'm being careful not to over feed her. I've also gotten one of those bowls with bumps in it that dogs have to eat around in an attempt to slow down her eating. She's not even chewing the kibble, just inhaling (she's gotten car sick a few times and the kibble is whole).

    I'm also wondering about potty training. We're crate training, and she hasn't weed or pooed in her crate. She has had a couple of wees in the house though and a bit of poo in my car. I'm wondering is he might be a tad more difficult to potty train because at the AWL she had to eliminate in her enclosure. I'm also wondering if there's anything that I should be doing differently to help her get potty trained.

    Just thought I would share our good news and see if anyone has any tips

    Kenzie 1 by Monster Maille, on Flickr


    Kenzie 2 by Monster Maille, on Flickr


    Kenzie 3 by Monster Maille, on Flickr
    Last edited by Glitter009; 06-21-2011 at 10:10 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    118

    Default

    Oh wow, she's gorgeous! She looks like a real sweetie From the first pic she looks like she might have some Boston on her, I agree.. but the third one she looks like a little mouse! Perhaps even some heeler or cattle dog? Even foxie x type thing? That would explain the size.. god, I'm stumped! I'm normally good at this!

    The wolfing down food thing may very well be related to her past and having had to grab whatever she could. That's been my experience with rescue dogs, and it has settled down after a while. My current dog though, I'm still waiting for her to stop inhaling food! She's not a rescue, but a very timid and submissive little girl who was one of five adults, so I'm assuming she had to fight for her share with her previous owner. She could just be a little fattie guts though

    She might take a bit of time to settle in obviously, and shy at unexpected things - a lot of rescue dogs I've met have been scared of men or taken a lot longer to warm up to them. Do you have any idea of her background at all?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Thanks! No idea what her background is, the AWL said she was a stray. She's settling in amazingly quickly and gaining confidence. She seems to play with our other dogs happily and uninhibited. Her behavior is very submissive towards my husband but she still loves cuddles from him. She's slightly more likely to play with me, but she'd rather cuddle. She doesn't seem to be afraid of men at all nor does she shy away when men (or adults in general) wave their hands like some rescued dogs do.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    808

    Default

    She is a gorgeous dog.

    I think she needs more time to settle.....anyway let us know how she gets along and more photos, please
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    I can only echo the others - what a gorgeous looking dog!

    There will be nothing different you need to do simply because she is a rescue, unless she came from long term abuse and or a puppy farm and suffered severe neglect. The AWL would have infomred you of any issues if she had them.

    You are spot on about her toilet training too and the fact she had to toilet in her run at the AWL. The idea of toileting in the right spot will be easy to teach. Loads and loads of positive re-infrocement when she goes in the right place. Even carry a treat or two in your pocket to give her when she toilets in the right place.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Thanks Hachna & Anne

    How do I know when her toilet training is established enough that she can be out of the crate overnight? Our other two dogs sleep in the bedroom with us and we would like to bring her in as well. There's not enough room for a crate in the bedroom at the moment though. I'm hoping because she's an older puppy and has two canine role models she'll pick up potty training quickly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    808

    Default

    Hi Glitter,

    You sound like an experienced dog owner....I think you will know when the time comes.

    Do you not think potty training via crate will be different from without crate though? I only use a crate for training so I am not so sure about shifting from crate to non-crate, but i know if they move more (which is over night out of the crate) they need to go to toilet more (which might be the case without crate). Therefore I think if you want her sleep in your bedroom with other dogs, you might have to train her out of crate. This is just my opinion.
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    The only way of knowing is to trial her. Perhaps keep her in an enclosed area at night for the first week, such a room with the door closed or a baby gate across the opening.

    To be honest, I think a dog door is a must for dogs kept in side. Puppies, older dogs and others with health issues or just small bladders may never be able to hold their bladder all night and a dog door eliminates any issues.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Lucky dog, lucky your family, Glitter. I don't think you have much to worry about frankly. She sounds a great dog and just because she is a rescue it doesn't mean there is anything wrong with her or different about her. Generally, they just dogs who have become lost and people haven't found or don't want to find for reasons many and varied .

    All my dogs are rescued from pounds and some of them wolf their food down and others look at me as though I am trying to make them eat poison.

    Dogs are like humans: some sail through their "incarceration" and others are forever traumatised to a greater or lesser degree. I have two dogs who if they ended up in the pound today, despite my having had them both for seven years, people would think they have been beaten, they are cringers extraordinaire.

    I think you just carry on as you are, let your new girl into the bedroom with the others and if they have to go to the toilet through the night she will probably just follow them.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    The only way of knowing is to trial her. Perhaps keep her in an enclosed area at night for the first week, such a room with the door closed or a baby gate across the opening.

    To be honest, I think a dog door is a must for dogs kept in side. Puppies, older dogs and others with health issues or just small bladders may never be able to hold their bladder all night and a dog door eliminates any issues.
    Thanks Anne! We've been considering installing a doggie door so that the dogs have free roam of the yard and house. That being said, after we went through the toilet training phase we haven't had an accident inside with our two dogs. Well, except for the other day when Kenzie (the newest addition) weed inside and our mastiff x peed in the same spot later in the day. We were out of the deoderizer and enzyme spray so that was totally my fault.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •