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Thread: Mums Pain in the A$$ Dog GRrr

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Ok these are evil suggestions but that dog needs some really basic training.

    1. I would get your kids to coat their hands (or whatever bits get nipped) in rid or vicks vapour rub. Then when the dog bites it gets a gob full of taste yuck.

    2. Train your kids to push their hand further into dog's mouth and hold until about 1 second after the dog starts trying to spit the hand out. I was dealing with a "mouthy" puppy this morning - ripping your hand away gets you bitten. Leaving it there - just gets a feel (using mouth) not a bite. Pushing, gets you spat out ie discourages the mouthing.

    3. If you must take ruby, get a crate for her to protect her from the evil sh1t zoo x.

    4. Try to train the dog what you do want it to do. Ie sit without biting. Reward any kind of desirable behaviour and avoid any reward (yelling, attention) for bad behaviour. You may need to arm your kids with rid soaked socks or something to use as shields between them and the sh1t. But if the sh1t can connect yummy treats with good behaviour and your kids that would help too.
    Wonderful ideas...

    and just a note - if this was the other way around, if Ruby was doing this to them, let me guess, they'd be screaming aggressive dog, PTS! Maybe that needs to be thrown at them.
    Cheers Aleesha
    Lilly, OH & Boof ..... the 3 things that make life tick!

    All posts made under the name of "Shelby-001" are copywritten and may not be used in any publication or media without my prior written consent!

  2. #12

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    Bulldog-lover, I think it all comes down to the issues of the owners, which are your mum and her bf.

    The dog is apparently playing dominant over whoever in the house. She doesn't know what she is doing is not right, because no one steps in.

    She thinks she is just playing and enjoying herself, or the opposite she is protecting her territory. In either way, she is out of control and definitely needs some disciplines. I'm not suggesting physically punishment. I strongly recommend your mum to watch the TV show 'the Dog Whisperer'.

    A dog's mind should always stay in a state of calmness. Obviously your mum's dog is in mental disturbance, the dog is in fact not happy so that she needs to release the negative energy (eg. insecurity, anxiety or scare etc). in this case, she does so by attacking and biting.

    The way Hya suggested is useful but risky though, I have tried it myself. Because every time you back off when a dog bites, s/he learns that biting can send you (a source of negative energy) away. So no backing off, be calm and assertive, and tell the dog you are the boss!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwjxz View Post
    Bulldog-lover, I think it all comes down to the issues of the owners, which are your mum and her bf.

    The dog is apparently playing dominant over whoever in the house. She doesn't know what she is doing is not right, because no one steps in.

    She thinks she is just playing and enjoying herself, or the opposite she is protecting her territory. In either way, she is out of control and definitely needs some disciplines. I'm not suggesting physically punishment. I strongly recommend your mum to watch the TV show 'the Dog Whisperer'.

    A dog's mind should always stay in a state of calmness. Obviously your mum's dog is in mental disturbance, the dog is in fact not happy so that she needs to release the negative energy (eg. insecurity, anxiety or scare etc). in this case, she does so by attacking and biting.

    The way Hya suggested is useful but risky though, I have tried it myself. Because every time you back off when a dog bites, s/he learns that biting can send you (a source of negative energy) away. So no backing off, be calm and assertive, and tell the dog you are the boss!
    Sorry but I would not recommend his Mum to watch Cesar Milan. She is clearly an inexperienced dog owner who knows very little about dog behaviour or dog body language the last thing she needs to do is to try those methods when she is in fact not a professional. And if you read the disclaimer at the start of the show it tells you not to try the techniques at home and to consult a professional.

    She needs to first accept that what her dog is doing is wrong and not funny. She then needs to consult a professional behavioural dog trainer who can assess her particular dog and make a plan for that particular dog as every dog and situation is different. Using stuff from the TV willy nilly is more likely to make things worse as it could be the wrong thing for her dog. If she wants to start anywhere she should at least start with crate training so they dog can be crated to calm down before being allowed to interact with the family. In saying all of this I get the feeling she doesn't care or doesn't think her dog is in the wrong and so will not take measures to fix the behaviour.

    I would keep Ruby away from her for the time being, keep your kids away from her and make sure you assert yourself when you are around the sh1tzu. In the end your Mum should not be willing to put her Grandkids in harms way and you have the right to put your foot down and request the dog be confined while you are there or they come to your house.

  4. #14
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    I know I'm possibly going to be shot for this, but it is your mums house and not yours. It's also her dog.

    That said, I understand that turd burger dogs are a pain in the ass. The problem is, if you mum doesn't want the change then it won't happen, like Keira said.

    I've been fighting with my parents for years over what is acceptable and what isn't with dogs. At the present moment my Dads dog stands with his paws on the table (at dinner!!) so he can see what's going on. I tell him off and put him outside while we're eating, but when I walk into the kitchen and Dad's in there, guess what the dog is doing!

    If the dog is putting your kids and your dog in harms way, tell your mum the dog has to be outside or locked in a bedroom while you visit to avoid aggravation to the dog in case she's tired, or your kids get too rough. You just want to protect her dog. (LOL).

    I'd also get your most dramatic kid to absolutely chuck the biggest wobbly of their life the next time the dog snaps. Extra points for screaming and real tears. Seeing one of her grandchildren like that caused by her dog might get her to change her opinion a bit (or at least lock the little mutt away).

  5. #15
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    I will not and have not risked my kids or dogs in situations that I am not happy with.
    My kids or dog would not be going to her house unless the dog was contained (my mother always put her possibly nippy Australian terrier in her room when people came to visit)

    If this was me in your situation I would in no uncertain terms but not nastily tell her how you feel, how this could turn out worst case scenario. If nothing happens then I would tell her that she is very welcome to visit me and the kids (without the dog) but I fear for their safety when visiting them.

    It will be too late if there is an attack.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #16
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    I agree wtih K&P, Cesar Milan techniques used by an unsupervised already proven incompetent dog trainer, is a really bad idea. Ie if the mother starts "alpha rolling" the Sh1tzoo, it will become even more aggressive and fearful and viscious. And not just with the visitors.

    It is the mother's house, so if subversive dog training techniques don't work (ie rewarding the good and taking the fun out of the bad), then it may be safest to avoid visiting your mum while the dog is allowed free run of attack around the house. If your mum is willing to lock the dog up, or even better, help with training it into more appropriate behaviour - then you could visit safely again.

    I know a few people whose food prep practices are so bad in my opininon (eg letting cats jump on and eat off the kitchen bench and table where the human food is prepared), I won't eat there. It's alright for those who live there, their immune system is up for it but mine isn't. The fact that they smoke inside doesn't help either.

    So I'm with Didee on that one - if you can't visit in safety - don't go.

  7. #17
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    Small dogs get away with a lot in general.
    BL if your mom's dog was 60kg not 6kg, will you take your kids. I guess not. I think even you are annoyed about the dangerous swf dog, you will still make a visit. How about a little pressie to your mom? A muzzle for her dog.
    Last edited by hachna; 06-21-2011 at 07:03 PM. Reason: to add
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hachna View Post
    Small dogs get away with a lot in general.
    BL if your mom's dog was 60kg not 6kg, will you take your kids. I guess not. I think even you are annoyed about the dangerous swf dog, you will still make a visit. How about a little pressie to your mom? A muzzle for her dog.
    LMAO, Do they make muzzels for little teenie dogs?? I Might just get one actually
    Rubylisious


  9. #19
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    They need to change it from terrier to terror, because that's what most of them are.

  10. #20
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    We had an Aussie Terror - who suffered in a house full of dog teasing teenagers. So we could hardly complain if she bit us occasionally. But it wasn't an everyday thing. She didn't chase us down to bite us. It was entirely defensive.

    They do make muzzles for tiny dogs. Vets use them.

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