Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Labrador Pups - Anyone Help?

  1. #11

    Default

    Labsrule would be the best one to answer that but from the few I have known I have found Goldens to be a bit more... "blonde"
    They can be a little more hyper and harder to train, but I have never known a nasty Golden, whereas I know a couple of Labs who are a bit touchy... that may not be related to breed though, just the ones that I have known.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    central coast nsw
    Posts
    802

    Default

    I had a golden retriever whilst living at home with my mum, it was unfortunate because i had to rehome her, i just did not have enough time for her, she, i am not sure about the general breed, but she needed someone with ALOT of time to train and bring her up properly. they seem to stay in "puppy stage" for quite a few years of their life. I was lucky that my aunty took her in, she already had a golden labrador so was used to the constant demand. Nala would be about 8 now and has only just started acting like an adult dog. She is still quite boisterous. But all in all a lovely, caring gentle girl. The breed i would say are gorgeous and very eager to please. But they want to please ALL the time!! lol very full on.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,583

    Default

    I like the info provided by these people who are lab specialists

    this page has loads of info on how to find your lab puppy
    Articles

    And this one is their lab line info site.
    Kelrobin Labradors - Michigan

    Personally - I've never noticed a colour difference in lab temperments. Mostly it comes down to how much work the owners put in. Do they think they've bought an instant guide dog or that they've bought the potential and they have to teach it...

  4. #14

    Default

    the difference between the lab and golden the lab is a bit smaller then the golden, labs have shorter hair but shed just as much as a golden does. Labs come in 3 colours where the golden only one. Not sure on the training with labs, but I can say my golden retriever Shelley she was very easy to train, very eager to please. I got Shelley at 14 weeks old within a day she was already siting when told too. I think both mature around the same time, but in saying that it depends on the dog and its lines. Buddy the male golden here acted like a adult the day we brought him home at 6 weeks old. Where Shelley didn't mature till about 2 years old.

    Golden retrievers do require more grooming then the lab. I brush Shelley every couple of days as it helps keep the hair down. But you could brush them once or twice a week. It takes about a hour for me to completely brush Shelley.

  5. #15

    Default

    Thank you again everyone! I can't believe how lovely you all are!

    I'm leaning more towards goldens as I have had experience with them before, and I LOVE the grooming side of things!! I spend a good 20 minutes brushing our long fur kitten just because of the pure enjoyment I get from it!! So grooming in itself is definitely not a problem!

    Also, are golden retrievers able to do agility training and elite obedience training? I have already contacted a highly respected training school for details and prices and I would love to train the pup up as far as we can go!

    Thank you again everyone

  6. #16

    Default

    Goldens will love agility and obedience. I got my Shelley playing on chilrens playground equipment. She goes up a platform runs accross a bridge up another platform then down the slide. I would love to do agility here but no one here does it. I do take Shelley to obedience tho and she is doing great.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,583

    Default

    Goldens and Labs do well at obedience training. And they can also participate in retriever club fun.

    Agility - they can do, but I don't see many. I suspect that their height sets the jumps at a joint damaging height for those breeds. But you could do non-competitive agility at club and mock trials at lower height and reduce the risk of damage. If you can keep your lab or GR really lean it might be ok but loads of people will ask questions since lean lab or GR are rare.

    If you want a hairy dog for agility - consider a sheltie or aussie shepherd or even a rough coat collie.

    And for an odd dog to see doing agility - I have seen an old english sheep dog.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    35

    Default

    rutherglen - in answer to your question about differences between a Lab and Goldie, apart from physical differences, they are both wonderful breeds with fabulous temperaments and both great family dogs. Over the years I have heard and read opinions from people who have had both breeds and the common differences from these owners seem to be along the lines of:

    • Labs are more independent whilst Goldies are more demanding of their owner’s time
    • Labs are more boisterious and a more hardy, rough and tumble type breed with a high pain tolerance
    • Labs are easier to train than Goldies
    • Labs are more energetic than Goldies
    • Goldies can be enthusiastic diggers
    • Labs grooming requirements are less than Goldies


    I have met some beautiful Goldies over the years and about 5 years ago I was very close to adopting a beautiful 10month old Goldie youngster from a local rescue group that I used to visit and take the dogs out for walks and outing and play with them. This boy was just beautiful with a fabulous temperament and I was very attached to this boy from the moment I met him, he was an awesome dog and luckily it didn't take long for him to be adopted.

    You will always get some differing opinions of both breeds and that is quite normal as people base it on their own experiences and a personal example of this happened with me. A few years ago I had to rush back to NZ unexpectedly around Xmas time and could not get my black lab boy I had at the time into kennels, but luckily one of the pet sitting companies had a couple with a female Golden Retriever who offered to look after my boy if our dogs got on. They did, which I expected as my boy was just fabulous with every dog he met and when I went to pick him up after returning from my trip, the couple told me that he was just the most awesome dog and they had been considering getting another Golden Retriever as a mate for their girl, but they were so impressed with my boy with how easy he was to manage compared to their girl and how closely bonding he was with them, that they decided they would get a Labrador instead as a mate for their girl I did explain to them though that my boy was a pretty exceptional dog and was a pretty challenging pup/adolescent but I had worked very hard on the training aspect with him and I had an exceptionally strong bond with this dog, despite his sometimes outrageous puppy/adolescent behaviour. They did say that their girl was also very challenging as a puppy/adolescent, but they had learned a lot and wouldn't make the same mistakes they did with their 2nd dog, but were still convinced they wanted a Labrador after falling in love with my boy.

    At the end of the day no matter which breed you decide to go with, you still need to do research on the breed of your choice and find the right breeder and I would advise you to visit local breeders to see their dogs and have a chat with the breeders about their breed and they should tell you both the pros and cons of their breeds and importantly offer support to any puppy buyers that buy their pup. Another thing you may want to consider is attending a Dog Show in Tasmania where hopefully there may be a selection of both Labs and Goldies and you may be able to have chat with some breeders. Also Check out this website Tasmanian Canine Association - the Tasmanian Canine Association Inc (TCA Inc) is the organisation which administers all pure-bred canine activities in your State and they also list the registered breeders within your State.

    Whatever breed you decide to finally go with, you can't go wrong with either breed, as both have exceptional temperaments and both make truly wonderful family members when raised correctly by meeting all their needs. It is so important for new puppy buyers to take advantage of the wealth of information across the internet on these wonderful breeds so they gain an understanding of their needs and what it will take to raise a beautiful lab or goldie puppy into a very happy well adjusted adult. The last point I would also like to stress is that, above everything else, the correct temperament for your breed of choice is so very important, particularly when you have children, so it is very important that you confine your search for a pup to registered (with ANKC), reputable and ethical breeders whose goal in life is not only to breed pups to the breed standard but to constantly try to better their breed. These people normally breed dogs with awesome temperaments and they also do all the necessary health checks for the parents. Do not underestimate the importance of temperament, as it can be downright dangerous to kids and their families to bring a pup/dog with questionable temperament into a family. Dogs with correct awesome temperaments are not only a pleasure to have in the family, but the temperament also helps them cope with what life throws at them. I have personally seen some Labs suffer at the hands of their ignorant owners that have been quite clueless about a Lab's needs and how to raise them correctly, but they were extremely fortunate that their Lab's possessed the correct legendary Lab temperament and their Labs were what I call "bombproof" because of their fabulous temperament and survived their precarious upbringings pretty well unscathed.

    Good luck with the research and all the best in your decision as you have chosen two of the most awesome breeds around.

  9. #19

    Default

    Golden retrievers are highly represented in obedience trials over my way, and there are also quite a few at agility trials. The jump height should not be a problem for a healthy and fit dog. Many females are small enough to compete as 500 dogs.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •