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Thread: What to Do About Fighting Dogs

  1. #31
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    I don't blame you being worried. Once a taste of mauling/ killing is there it will not go away. Your dog could also be shot as you probably know if caught in the act.

    Can you put an electric wire or something along the top of the fence or as someone on another forum suggested for a similar problem poly pipe over a length of wire that will turn and hopefully prevent escape?

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  2. #32
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    You can definitely get a crate for less than $200.

    She was lucky to live after chasing sheep.

  3. #33

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    As my partner and I work full time neither of us have the time right now to crate train her. Surely locking her in a crate without any training or minimal training is going to the more harm then good... I've discovered she did indeed jump over the back fence. We are putting heavy duty lattice across the top of the fence now to hopefully keep her in. I was looking at the Crates that Steve from K9 has on his website and will probably purchase one of those.

  4. #34
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    As my partner and I work full time neither of us have the time right now to crate train her.
    Do you have time to walk these dogs? What do you do when you get home? What about before you get to work? What about feeding time for the dogs. Ie crate training would take no more than five minutes a day, maybe less, for a week. If you have 20 minutes at one time that would be ideal but it's not that important. Most of my crate training or training comfort in the crate involves me eating breakfast with an extra slice of toast and promite and she has to go in the crate on command - to get a bit of toast, and then come out on command to get another bit of toast, and go in - another bit of toast, and wait for it, another bit of toast, until the toast is all gone.

    You also feed the dogs in their crates each day, which helps get them happy about the idea of being in there. And while you're home, you can practice shutting the door, and feeding toast through the sides or top.

    Surely locking her in a crate without any training or minimal training is going to the more harm then good
    It's not ideal but it's better than the dog being mauled to death by the other dog, or shot by an angry farmer etc. So I would say in your situation - it's less harmful than your current alternatives. You can discuss with Steve if you like. But before I was very familiar with what crate training involved, if I needed to go out, sticking the puppy in the crate was exactly what I did. She got used to it.

    I've discovered she did indeed jump over the back fence. We are putting heavy duty lattice across the top of the fence now to hopefully keep her in.
    I hope this sorts it but I'm not sure, given there must be something horrible inside the fence or fantastic outside of it for your dog to go to the effort of jumping out. So your dog may well try again, and try other methods of escape. I knew one dog that would pull the fence apart and many that would try to dig under.

    I was looking at the Crates that Steve from K9 has on his website and will probably purchase one of those.
    Talk to Steve first, but I think you may be better with a mesh metal crate for your needs. He may be able to recommend a site for these but I found vebo pet to be good - though I already had a metal crate, and bought a soft sided crate for travel from them.

    Long term you may also want to think about building or buying a dog run - with dig proof floors and jump proof mesh roof. But they really are expensive.

    PS this soft sided crate - I saw being used at a seminar and the owner said that her dog had eaten its way out of a mesh crate (damaging her teeth) and several soft sided crates but not this particular one. I haven't bought anything from bowhouse.com.au myself so I don't know how good they are for dealing with but I know the crate is a good one.
    http://www.bowhouse.com.au/p/671860/...vel-crate.html

    And this is the vebopet site (note they won't send to po boxes as they use a private courier).
    http://shop.vebopet.com.au/store/lar...age-crate.html
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 06-09-2011 at 11:53 AM.

  5. #35

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    Thanks for your help again Hyacinth. I was paid today so was hoping to get the crates. Are there any brick and mortar shops that aren't too ridiculously priced for a crate? I'm in the Epping area (northern suburbs of Melbourne) but don't mind traveling to find one.

    I could definately spare that amount of time to train the dogs, Its just keeping them seperated whilst training thats going to be the hard part.

  6. #36

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    Crocky's Crates 03 5998 7135 Tell him Donna from STBCV sent you... he will do a good deal 36"for $80 with postage of $20 on top of that...

  7. #37
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    Hope they are behaving themselves for you today darling
    Rubylisious


  8. #38
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    keeping them separated...

    You put them both in crates at the same time?

    Advice I had was you reward the one that has to stay put, two to three times as often as you reward the one you're working with.

    But for starters - you can feed them in their crates. If there is food that's not too messy, give some in bowl and hand feed some through the sides.

    And try not to reward doggy complaining. Ie try to get in with loads of treats - before the dog can start whinging about being in the crate.

    Mine would whinge something special at dog club despite the fact that she went in voluntarily. Sooner or later I'd have to leave her while I set up gear and she'd start carrying on. So I'd take a step towards her and if she made any noise - I'd turn the other way - like that kiddies came of "what's the time Mr Wolf". Noise = retreat, quiet = approach. she learned to shut up if she wanted to get out pretty quick.

  9. #39

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    Another quick terrible update.

    Cleo (5yr old) attacked Darla today. I was at work and my partner rang me in tears. They took their eyes off them together for a split second and it was on. Darla now has a 3cm laceration on her lip, eye is bleeding, 2cm lac on the mid section and two smaller lac's on the rear leg. She is at the Lort Smith tonight, they are stablising her and operating tomorrow. She will be OK but I dunno if I will... These dogs will be the death of me. We are building a seperate fence tomorrow to have them apart 24hrs a day. We just can't give one up so its going to be hard but its the only choice we are left with.

  10. #40
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    I am so sorry to hear that.
    Yes, permanent separation is called for now after this.

    Please keep us updated on how Darla is doing.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

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