View Poll Results: Should dog owners keep their unleashed dogs from invading the space of leashed dogs?

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  • Unleashed dogs should not be allowed to approach leashed dogs

    16 80.00%
  • unleashed dogs should be able to approach leashed dogs

    5 25.00%
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Thread: How Far Should an Offleash Dog or Dogs Go Before Our Leashed Dogs Should React?

  1. #61
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    I wouldn't be scruffing any dog showing aggression unless it was the size of a cat or it was brachy like the Pug. I don't believe in alpha rolling either (assuming this is what is meant by 'tking a dog to the ground' ).

    Dogs are dogs. They're not machines. They have insitincts and natural behaviours that even the experts can't always understand. How a pet owner is meant to understand them I'll never know. Dogs are never bombproof or predictable either on or off lead.

    The fact is we have dogs, we have off lead areas and we have people who don't put leads on them when they should (ie. as is required by law). We can all only be prepared as much as possible and attmept to control any dog as best we can.

    Would I jump in front of a dog coming at my Pugs? You bet I would and I would be pumping with adrenalin hoping I could ward off, stop or prevent an injury to me or my dog.

    Would it worry me if a dog rushed at my dogs? Of course it would, and I would take evasive action in the hope it prevented an attack.

    Whose responsiblity is it? If my dogs are on lead and under my control, then I would think responsibility lies with the attacking dog's owner. I would expect that they would assist and come to my aid in separating the dogs or stoppping the attack. If the owner had experienced problems like this before then I would nail the bastards for being so irresponsible. If it was a once off and unexpected I would hope they learnt somethig from it and looked for ways to prevent such a thing recurring.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  2. #62
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    May 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anne View Post
    Ok, I give up easily. What the hell is this thread about!

    Effective control can diminish in a millisecond. Dogs are animals. They are unpredictable.

    On lead, off lead, it doesn't matter.
    If there is evidence of someone controlling their dog or beleiving they have control fo their dog, that is good enough for me regardless of it being on lead or off lead.

    If my dog was on lead and attacked by another that was off lead, I would be just as upset as I would be if mine was also off lead. I would also understand that is is the nature of dogs and animals. If there was evidence that the owner of the attacking dog knew that there dog was likely to attack, I would be angry.

    So... um, what exactly is thsi thread about. The responses are so detailed and meandering and I feel I have missed something somehwere???
    which is what I have been defending (bold part of your quote), in addition to defending that the leashed dog under owners control is not bombproof and given the respect that compromising situations occur, perhaps you can take it up with those who insist its irresponsible not to maintain full control when owner of leashed dog and owner are in jeopardy.

  3. #63
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    May 2009
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    I don't quite understand the poll either.

    I answered that an unleashed dog should be able to approach a leashed dog. However, I have based this on the fact that the unleashed dog is in an area that it is allowed to be off leash.

    If a dog is not on leash, and it is in a public area that is not demmed 'off leash' then I would think the owner of the uinrestrained dog is opening themselves up to problems, not neccessarily through aggression or attacks but just that they are breaking the law.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  4. #64
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    May 2011
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    Gold Coast, Queensland
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    Default some sanity to end this thread-

    WELL, finally someone who has expressed my thoughts with accuracy from the very first post. Thankyou, I believed at the time, that it should have been this simple. Feel free to go back to my original three or four posts, you will get the picture, I am sure. Thanks, especially for this part of your post Dogs are dogs. "They're not machines. They have insitincts and natural behaviours that even the experts can't always understand. How a pet owner is meant to understand them I'll never know. Dogs are never bombproof or predictable either on or off lead." The first post I made supported the fact that dogs off leash, anywhere....should not invade the walking experience of those with leashed dogs under their control. Like yourself, I know I am doing the right thing both by my dog and myself and the law as it is-however had all kinds of suggestions such as my dog needs retraining until it can withstand anything basically (attacks etc), then OP went so far as too say the reason my on lead dog suffered a chunk out of her muzzle was because of my ineffective dog handling, and the thread has had individuals commenting with regard to some posts and not all in its context. I was taught in a legal sense that one has to know the story before jumping in half cocked. Thanks again for now understanding that anyone who thinks they have complete control over their dogs and other dogs behaviours are kind of out there. There are no guarantees, they are dogs and may exhibit unpredictable acts when least expected. I acknowledge that and would never think with 100% certainty anything other.
    Last edited by Dakota_Chey; 05-16-2011 at 03:16 PM. Reason: grammer

  5. #65
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    May 2011
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    My posts stated that I had no objections to those who wanted to indulge, or as I remember stating that be it at their own risk, those whom wanted to be in an approved offleash dog area. I posted the poll to end the debate, which I was of the opinion that in any other area than designated offleash dog parks; / exercise areas- dogs should be kept on leash in places such as suburbia, footpaths, congested public places, parks, in fact anywhere really that people and dogs frequent. I empathise with those that were against this because they live in the country or bush perhaps, but again stated that if their dogs are offleash and another dog is on leash, they should respect the onleash dog by having it under effective control so that it does not impose on the onleash dog under any circumstances. Hope that clarifies for you. I do have the experience also off having my german shepherd on leash in a country area where in fact was her favourite place, we think-and a couple of heelers off leash with their owner, probably out for their daily walk offlead, came rushing toward us and both were showing dominance and aggression. Its a hairy situation (lol) all around, and an apolegetic owner came running down the road towards us seeing that his dogs were causing a debarkle(lol). Although my dog was on leash and probably most of the dogs around the area were probably familiar with one and other, they saw my dog as a threat. Trying to battle two aggro dogs or even one at times is enough to put someone who is within the law, feeling under threat of injury, not to mention the worry that my own dog would get involved in any split second in time (which she never ever failed me-however as I stated previous to this reply, she was a dog after all-and dogs are not infalliable. Cheers

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dakota_Chey View Post
    there is a show on channel 7 running at this moment. A woman has received substantial muscle and nerve damage defending her dog from another dog in attack toward her dog. At no point have I said, or been given the chance to state that I indeed have and would intervene as best I could whilst my near 40kilo dog is on leash and under attack. Angelanbatty appear to think that they have ultimate control over such events occuring, further stating that they often scruff hold the offenders dog or offending dog and take them to the ground. I would like to see that apply with a large labrador as what happened in my case. The program currently showing the risk associated with this predominant thinking is called medical emergency for those who maybe interested in the verdict.
    I've scruffed two 50kg mastiffs (seperate occassions), many labs, a great dane and three small dogs of indetermined breed. So yes it can be done. There is a HUGE problem with strays in my area. I am small but I have worked for various shelters with the dogs and for the RSPCA too. I learnt a lot there particularly about handling dogs who are boisterous, excited, rambunctious etc.

    I have trained a reliable sit & stay and when I say stay my dog stays until I command him to move. This is what I expect of my dog. I don't allow dogs to approach barking in his face unless I know them. There is only one dog that I tolerate it from and that is because the owners are working on the problem and I have been helping them with it.

    I react quickly to any situation and I am always aware of my surroundings. I have to be. I also have a mild anxiety problem due to being attacked when I was younger in a public place, so perhaps paranioa plays a part. I don't know. I don't see why that is hard to believe though?

  7. #67
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    DC-jen

    At no point have I said, or been given the chance to state that I indeed have and would intervene as best I could whilst my near 40kilo dog is on leash and under attack.
    At no point have we stopped you from saying whatever you want.

    Some of us might stop reading it though. You've started to repeat yourself and your sentences are very hard to follow.

    For me, I don't think I could stand by and watch my dog be attacked even though I know intervening is likely to get me injured. I know the safest way to remove an aggressive dog is to grab it by the hind legs, but I'm more likely to kick it and hit it over the head as hard as I can.

    If it's someone else's dog in the fight, I just make sure my dog doesn't get involved. Even though I might be quite fond of that dog.

  8. #68
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    I have a recent event, where Tessa was attacked unprovoked by a Blue heeler, off leash, whilst we were walking on lead. I grabbed the Blue Heeler by his back legs to try and get him off. It did not work and I had to get him off her throat, he was clamping down and her eyes were bulging.........So I tried to pry the jaws and at least got him of her, he bit me, rather severely, still painful at times
    And my stupid Tessa then went to attack him. Anyway it ended well......Old guy came with a shovel and dog took off, never to be seen again.
    No-one was with that dog....No one to blame and to be cross with. Just me responsible for my own dog and having to do what I do automatically, protect my dogs. I know I was stupid getting into a dog fight. But I did not think, adrenaline rush and very angry.
    So I cannot blame anyone and I just get on. I still walk my dogs, I still keep an eye out. But I still think that mostly nothing happens.
    I drive a car, there are a lot of lunatics on the road. One driver can kill other people by being stupid, it could be me one day. But I still drive a car.
    Pets are forever

  9. #69
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    May 2011
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    , he said she said, should not have had to rpt. the hind legs-lol, what size dog are we talking about here? lmao

  10. #70
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    May 2011
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    Gold Coast, Queensland
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    well, two heelers, different story, however the one labrador that already had hold of my gsd muzzle, like clamped down on her entire muzzle was dragged of my dog leaving her, yes with a sizeable chunk of flesh missing. I don't think tess is stupid, just for the record, I think she proves my point, or one of them, that she was doing nothing wrong, and regardless of anything, the other dog was in the wrong-period........and she is a dog, think about her adrenaline and how does she contain that when its surging through her body-does she need retraining? I doubt it, she acted within the confines of instinct.

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