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Thread: Just a Vent

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    northern NSW
    Posts
    44

    Default Just a Vent

    Oh how I hate the people who have their dogs offlead if they can't control them. I was walking my girl this morning when a man, with a baby in a pram approached - he had his dog off lead. It rushed towards my girl, hackles up and started barking. Not bowed down as if it wanted to play. It was a much larger dog than mine. He called it, but it didn't respond. He said "it won't hurt your dog". There's no way that I could pick up my 20kg dog, even if I wanted to. I got my dog to sit, hoping that it would be a non threatening position to the other dog. I told her to "ignore". and she trusted me enough to do that. Why do people do that?

  2. #2

    Default

    That's a pet peeve of mine too.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Why?

    Because they've never seen a dog hit by a car as it runs across the road to greet another dog.

    And it's illegal in NSW to have your dog off lead and out of control in a public place.
    COMPANION ANIMALS ACT 1998 - SECT 13 Responsibilities while dog in public place

    So you could report to council. Especially if you surrepticiously get the rego number off the dog collar while it's greeting you. And as far as I know, all dogs have to be registered unless they are working farm dogs - on the farm.

    Maybe the best approach is to remind the guy that his dog may die if he can't control it. There are many ways - eating baits for dingos, snails and rats or an encounter with a snake or roo, or car, or savage dog or person.

  4. #4

    Default

    A few months ago I was almost pulled over by my 2 rotties when a poodleX ran up to us aggressively. Lucky for that dog that mine are friendly as it caught me offguard and I didn't have time to right myself and stop them in time. The owner just smiled at me and said sorry. I was very shook up from my 10 metre sprint that I almost was dragged face first. I can't remember what I managed to say to the man but it wasn't nice. You think he would have got a scare tho having 2 50kg rotties running straight for him but no. The next day he was walking his dog off leash while I was driving past. Now because of people like him I cannot walk both my dogs alone incase I come across a off lead dog like that. I hope I dont see him again while walking cos I no I would b a smart ***. And prob get myself in trouble. i think I would just follow him home and report him to council.

  5. #5

    Default

    I feel your pain - If people can't control their dogs they shouldn't have them off lead. End of discussion. We have way too many people in out area with that problem.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    423

    Default

    Heading home from a long journey a few weeks ago and decided to give my two large dogs a drink at a nice clear running river crossing, got over the bit of a hill and saw another lady there with three cattle dogs, she saw me with two dogs on leads and raced around loading her dogs into her ute, well, I thought to be nice and just let her know I would only be a few minutes so I called out that I would not be long,her response was to drive off a bit then pull up and abuse me for not waiting when I saw her there first!

    This on a big river, her dogs out of control, mine on lead, and she had the hide to think I ought not to water mine ? got told in good old bush style what go and do, but see from that wee experience how it must be for those of you who encounter these weird creatures all the time 8>)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, Queensland
    Posts
    100

    Default Introduction and issues with dogs off leash

    https://picasaweb.google.com/1003836.../DakotaChey02#


    https://picasaweb.google.com/100383628077541794421/Cheyanne#
    links of Cheyanne and DakotaHI all, We are new to this forum, Dakota and I. Totally understand the frustration as did our big beautiful longcoat g.shepherd that very recently passed away. When we walked her, we came across all kinds of ignorance and it affected her mostly directly as being such a big girl, we knew the blame would always be with her if she reacted at the many off leash dogs that would instantly become aggressive because they seemed intimidated by her size. She received quite a few nips to her underchin area by little nippy dogs and one attack to her muzzle by a labrador. Cheyanne whom was very soft and dog social, went from a well mannered girl to then raising her fur along her back when these dogs off their lead would tear up to her full of aggro. All in all, she got apprehensive, we got apprehensive and Cheyanne suffered then from crying to the point of our embarrassment, lol-because basically she had always been a very social girl with both people and other dogs and could not understand why we just could not take the risk of even meet and greets, in case she was bitten-therefore she would cry in desperation to socialise, I suppose wondering why she was not allowed to any longer. Had people controlled their dogs on leashes, nothing would have had to change. Without being biased, I saw something interesting on the tv. Little dogs seem to be trusted to run here and there by their owners and when a large dog approaches, owners tend to run toward their barking little friends and scoop them up, holding them up high as if they are going to be attacked. The dog trainer said that from a psychological perpective in doggie psych. that it automatically tells the dog that is standing on leash, that the higher dog is superior to it in ranking and causes confusion and tension between the two. I think that we have a wealth of knowledge to learn from our furry friends and forums such as these are a valuable resource for all interested dog owners. We have a new german shepherd longcoat big boned puppy, Dakota Chey (second name in memory of Cheyanne) and life without Cheyanne inspired us in our purchase and love of Dakota because we knew that life could not be the same without our German Shepherd as a valuable member in our family. No doubt the same trials and tribulations will arise with Dakota, however dogs are not and should not be expected to be saints and one would think that there should be a common respect for each and all of our dogs by keeping them on a leash always unless one decides to take their furry friend and the risk to leashfree dog parks.https://picasaweb.google.com/1003836...4421/Cheyanne#
    Last edited by Dakota_Chey; 05-07-2011 at 12:31 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    I think responsibility is perhaps being avoided here.
    If your dog is not under your control when approached in ANY manner by an offleash dog, then you need to repeat your training.

    Note:
    You are powerless to control the behaviour of others, you are better off
    investing energy in taking the control that is available, ie. you and your dog's behaviour.

    With training, you can shape any dog to behave under your control. He may never "like" doggy friends. But he should bloody well behave.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    Good luck with Dakota Chey.
    Its sad to lose an old dog. And then having said stuff like "never again!" you've got your bundle of fluff, and you're smitten.
    We have a med/long haired red GSD boy. He's 2 and the smartest dog ive ever owned.
    Compared to rotties, (the previous 2 were rotties), GSD's ROCK!

    But i do miss that numptiness of the rottie. Forgetting he's under the dining table and standing up, knocking the plates off, EVERY time! for 8 yrs?

    Next year, as a second dog perhaps?
    I can make this choice, because my dog is bomb proof. Thanks to other people who own dogs that can run nuts off leash! Who helped in shaping my dog for me.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, Queensland
    Posts
    100

    Thumbs up

    Thanks for the reply and I concur with regard to the intelligence of the GSD. Cheyanne, unfortunately was just under 7 yrs, and died of a fatal seizure. Cheyanne was a rescue dog with special needs whom we took under our wing when malnourished and weighing just 24 kilos but one of the largest standing girls often mistaken for a big boy. We managed to get Cheyanne to an appropriate weight for her height at 40 kilos. She also came with the special need of having epilepsy. Cheyanne acted indifferent that fatal day, preferring to be on her own (unusual-however it was also quite hot here on the Gold Coast). We got vet advice and nothing in particular could be pinpointed as dogs often want to be left alone in the heat. She was quite restless that afternoon, going from the sofa to the floor, from the floor to the door, from the door to back inside, etc. She was gradually cooled down and ate her evening meal. I think she knew. All night I checked on her and she was her beautiful self each time. My last check on her was at 3.05am in the morning where she was in the house with back door open in case she had felt the need to go outside. No sleep that night. Again went to check at 4.20am, she was missing from inside. Dark outside, not in laundry, I looked out to large dark backyard, no Cheyanne from where I stood at the laundry door frozen in a knowing. Husband awoken, took torch, Come on Chey, come on girl, up-I heard. Holding onto the doorway in knowing- Go in, husbands voice broken, come on lets go inside-shock, run up hide on bed, scream into pillow, tears, days, weeks, still the tears. Not bombproof, neither her nor I, nor would I expect total control-its not mine to own. With respect, I agree to disagree. In loving memory of Cheyanne 15/5/1994-23/3/2011.

    The following link supports my rationale that dogs on leads under threat should not be bombproof. This is the story of something that hit our family out of the blue and my dear grandson Eden who suffered and is now unable to get over his fear of any black and tan dog, regardless of size, including my own german shepherd Dakota. I am proud of the fact that the large wolfhound referred to who is a clumsy but a gentle giant named Chopper, acted on instinct when he indeed was on a leash. Therefore he was not under control', not bombproof. If not for Chopper, we all agree Eden after being taken to the ground by the rottweiler whom was unleashed, may definately not be with us as of today. Just this easter, Eden took us for a walk and showed us exactly what happened and how close to home it was, on the way to the beautiful beach of Toogum, whilst we were holidaying. Thanking the out of control side of Chopper and trusting in our pets to quickly assess a situation and act naturally when in dire need to do so. Young boy mauled by Rottweiler | Fraser Coast News | Local News in Fraser Coast | Fraser Coast Chronicle
    Last edited by Dakota_Chey; 05-10-2011 at 10:28 PM. Reason: update rationale for support for dog on leash to not necessarily be bombproof.

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