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Thread: Dog Being Attacked

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    4

    Default Dog Being Attacked

    Hi all,

    About 5 weeks ago, my dog was playing with his usual group of dog friends when a boxer approached. We know this boxer and the owner started to throw her ball around and at one stage my dog (miniature schnauzer) also ran after the ball. The boxer did not like this and attacked my dog leaving nasty bite wounds on his neck. I might add here my dog did not retaliate in any way, he was petrified and didn't know what to do.

    We took him to the vet and was told he would be fine. A few days later we started walking him again (with no collar because it hurt his wounds) and he would happily play with his own friends. When new dogs approached, he would be a bit scared but not aggresive.

    Today, my partner took him to the park (which is across from us) and a standard poodle came over to say hello. My partner told me our dog sniffed and then went to walk off when the poodle started growling and tried to bite my dog. My partner quickly picked up our dog and checked his neck, but the poodle had only managed to get slober on him.

    My question is, why did this happen again especially when it was unprovoked? My dog did not run after a ball, did not growl etc.. Is he showing fear which other dogs are sensing?

    My dog used to be so happy and LOVE to play with every single dog that walked past.. now he will only play with dogs he knows and even then it is very subdued..

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Some mini schnauzers give off "aggressive" vibes to other dogs, they run to greet directly with direct eye contact and their ears and tails up, which some dogs view as a challenge.

    I'd suggest you make sure that all greetings your dog has with new dogs are closely supervised or he might progress to the "I'll get them before they get me" fear aggression.

    My dog was attacked repeatedly by one particular whippet. There was no damage to my dog, but the whippet continued to attack when my dog rolled over for it - ie crazy whippet. It took some careful meetings with other whippets for my dog to know they're not all crazy.

    Not all dogs are pleased to see other dogs or want to play. Most dogs are very tolerant of "rude" puppies but get less tolerant of older dogs that have not learned to be "polite".

    It's important not to let your dog run straight up to every dog it sees - this is not appropriate doggy greeting manners and is not be well received by some dogs. It's also important not to let your dog go near another dog's toys without checking with the owner and close supervision.

    It is bad of the boxer owner to bring a toy when she knows her dog is a "resource guarder", you would need to ask her not get stuff out that her dog might guard. If she's not willing to do this - you need to report her to council. It's pretty standard dog park ettiquette - no toys (or treats) unless all owners are happy about it, and none of the dogs will fight over them.

    I don't know what the poodle's problem was - my dog sometimes does growls and howls and talks when she wants the other dog to play tho she doesn't usually touch the other dog. You need to make sure that you closely supervise doggy greetings. Ie both dogs need to be on lead and only be allowed to approach on loose lead - if either lead goes tight in either direction, you (both) need to back off and try again. If one dog is going behind the owner - you need to wait or leave it be because it is afraid. A successful doggy greeting is complete when both dogs have sniffed both ends.

    Snatching a dog up is not a great idea, other dogs will see the movement as prey running away and it may trigger an automatic chase / jump / pursuit. Which depending on the other dog - can be nasty if it suddenly thinks your dog is something to be chased and killled.

    What I do is stand over my dog or with my dog behind me and use what ever I've got - standing taller than the other dog, and yelling and kicking or swinging my lead at the other dog. We're talking life and death here - most dogs will back off if you stand up and yell at them (with deep growly voice like a fierce dog, not high pitched hysterics like a wounded rabbit).

    You may want to get some of Turid Rugaas's books or dvds as they can be a great help in reading doggy behaviour and helping your own dog send the right signals ie indirect approach, dropping, looking away, licking lips...

    Questions and answers from Turid Rugaas

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Thank you very much for your reply. Generally my dog is pretty good with greeting other dogs. He does wait for us to give him the Ok to do so and will approach slowly. In saying that, that does not always happen and sometimes he does get very excited.

    From now on, he won't be allowed off lead when there are other dogs around. This is such a shame because he knows how to heel and is really quite a good boy when he is off the lead. We usually have more of a problem of other dogs running over to him and he is submissive and lays down. We have had to tell quite a few owners off for letting their dog run and jump on ours when he is clearly not liking it and low to the ground.

    I appreciate the pointer for not picking him up when threatened. My partner and I have always picked him up when in danger but at the same time yelled at the other dog. From now on if he gets in to trouble we will stand in front of him and yell at the other dog to go away.

    I have just discovered Rugaars books today so will look to buy some, they look very helpful.

    Again, thanks very much. Your post was really helpful. Hopefully my dog starts to gain confidence in the near future. We are also considering getting another dog, I think he would appreciate this.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Hi Rhi4589

    I think it would be fine to let him off lead with dogs he knows and you know he gets along well with. And it should be fine to let him off with dogs he's made a successful confident greeting with.

    You can still pick your dog up if you feel it's the only way he can be safe. If there are two of you, it will help if one stands in front to block and the other behind with the dog. But you really don't want to be in that situation.

    I've seen one person pick up a dog and then swing around with it in his arms, trying to keep it away from boxer who was easily able to chase him around and still reach his dog -only to sniff - fortunately but all that swinging around kept the boxer excited and interested and made it really hard for the boxer's owner to catch her.

    I'm not sure how well owners read "clearly not liking it" with their dogs rolling over. My dog "clearly not liking it", is when she runs behind me, or tries to run for home. But she rolls over for most dogs by way of her greeting - ie she lets them sniff first. And most dogs do not jump on her but around, they sniff and they usually back off to initiate play, and then they may wrestle quite enthusiastically - though I admit most mini schnauzers I've seen prefer chasey to wrestling. Even with other dogs the same size. My dog likes both.

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