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Thread: Staffy Jaw

  1. #1

    Default Staffy Jaw

    Our 5 month old SBT puppy – Tyson had an emergency trip to the vet – all is well now.

    However, upon a general examination the vet brought to our attention his bottom jaw.
    The vet advised that his bottom jaw is severely undershot, which has led to his bottom canines sitting in the wrong spot and therefore piercing the top of his mouth and preventing his jaw from growing.

    The vets note reads:

    Malocclusion:
    Mandible greatly shorter of maxilla with mandibular Canines abutting hard palate causing trauma.
    Extraction of canines to permit optimal growth of mandible.
    Tyson may require orthodontic procedure in future when adult teeth erupt.

    The vet was also advised this condition should have been brought to our attention prior to us purchasing Tyson and that a defect such as this should have been diagnosed at birth.

    This came as a huge shock to us as we were under the impression Tyson had a clean bill of health.

    After becoming aware of this, I guess our first thoughts were that we purchased him from a VCA Registered Breeder– so we had complete trust in the advice and information provided.
    We also chose Tyson over another puppy on the grounds that he was healthy, and paid a premium price.

    Unsure of what to do, I contacted the VCA to discuss the situation.
    They advised that normally in a situation like this, the breeder would need to supply us with a new puppy or the breeder would need to refund us the money and we would return the puppy.
    I explained to the VCA that Tyson is in no way refundable. He is very much an adored member of our family and is irreplaceable.
    They advised us to negotiate the matter with the breeder – who I have not been able to get in touch with.

    Obviously the removal of his canines and the possibility of an orthodontic procedure is an unexpected expense and quite hefty one at that.
    We have since gone ahead with the procedure to ensure Tyson has the best quality of life.

    I have provided the Breeder with the above information in the hope that we could negotiate the liability of costs for these procedures – but we have had no such luck.

    I guess we should be thanking our lucky stars that the problem was discovered, and we were able to hopefully able to put a stop to the pain he was suffering.

    I just really wanted know people’s thoughts and any advise that they may have.
    And I also wanted to make sure potential puppy purchasers are aware.

    Ta,
    Laura

  2. #2

    Default

    hey, im so sorry to hear about this.. you sound like such an amazing person and tyson is extrmemly luck to have you... so good to hear!!
    i have no real advise as such but i do also have an issue with the breeder i bought my SBT pup from. he was from a CCCQ registered breeder and i have since found out through a vet check that my little boy only had 1 testicle, which is a genetic fault and will require surgery.
    i really hope your breeder gets back to you and that you have some luck,
    all the best renee x

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,602

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    Laura

    If you have the ANKC papers for your dog, you might want to ask your vet to contribute to the LIDA database with details for your puppy.

    LIDA - LIDA - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

    You may also want to put details of the problem with a copy of the vet diagnosis in writing and send to the SBT breeders association and the VCA so neither can claim they were uninformed about the problem. You could also put a copy of the vet diagnosis with details of your puppy and mail to the breeder. They might not respond to phone or email but they can't ignore a paper letter sent snail mail. If you're feeling really mean you could send it registered mail so they have to sign for it (make sure your return address is not instantly recognisable to them). So then they can't claim not to know about the problem.

    This would be the best way to reduce the chance of the breeder spreading the problem - at least among other the registered breeders. They won't want to risk that kind of problem with their puppies.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

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    All I can say is...I told you not to buy from that breeder....
    Education not Legislation

  5. #5

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    I received a reply from the breeder. She is convinced there is no problem.
    My biggest concerns is, she is going to breed puppies with the same condition.
    If Tyson's condition had gone undetected he would have endured quite a lot of pain and problems - it's sad to think another puppy may go thru the same troubles...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,785

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Laura

    If you have the ANKC papers for your dog, you might want to ask your vet to contribute to the LIDA database with details for your puppy.

    LIDA - LIDA - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

    You may also want to put details of the problem with a copy of the vet diagnosis in writing and send to the SBT breeders association and the VCA so neither can claim they were uninformed about the problem. You could also put a copy of the vet diagnosis with details of your puppy and mail to the breeder. They might not respond to phone or email but they can't ignore a paper letter sent snail mail. If you're feeling really mean you could send it registered mail so they have to sign for it (make sure your return address is not instantly recognisable to them). So then they can't claim not to know about the problem.

    This would be the best way to reduce the chance of the breeder spreading the problem - at least among other the registered breeders. They won't want to risk that kind of problem with their puppies.
    All of this and maybe your vet will write the Breeder a letter about the problem.

    Sad to see that there are breeders with the "ostrich syndrome". But some people are just there for the money, not to better the Breed.

    It is a shame you are in the middle of all of this.
    Pets are forever

  7. #7

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    Hey Laura,

    glad to hear Tyson is on the mend - unfortunately, as others have said, breeders can be unethical and unprofessional.

    Our Amstaff girl (see pic below) was sold to us at a reduced price and will be on limited register, as she has an undershot jaw. She is from a very reputable and sucessful show kennel (they will not repeat the mating that produced a couple of pups with these jaws). They explained in great detail about the condition and that it could mean vet bills later. They also made some suggestions as to what would help strengthen her jaw and teeth. Her adult teeth, other than being crowded, are coming out well - she hasn't got the condition as severely as your poor fella.

    I once had a massive run-in with a breeder over a couple of pups I paid a huge sum for back about twelve years ago. The first was extremely fearful (she was meant to be a breeding bitch who would have a litter before we had her spayed, so this trait would be continued on) and the second, at eight weeks, was riddled with worms, diagnosed by my vet as having sarcoptic mange and was so human aggressive, he bit the vet and couldn't be allowed any contact with my two year old son. The breeder was finally forced with the back up from my vet, to take the pups back and give a refund in both cases, but she blamed me for everything, denied the diagnosis (we had no other mange infected dog and hadn't had time to expose the pup to anywhere else that would). She is still in the Dogs NSW breeder list for her breed. Go figure!

    Good luck with your situation,

    Cathy.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
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    Are you sure this pup does need dental work done, pulling teeth out will NOT make the jaw grow any more, nor stop it from growing if not pulled, the jaw might grow and cause the teeth to be out of line but they cannot stop the jaw from growing, that is rubbish.
    You should have been told of the fault and not sold this pup at the same price as one without the defect, none the less watch for vets wanting to do surgery that may not be needed, can you actually see damage from the bottom teeth on the top jaw? usually the back teeth stop the front canines from doing damage because the front teeth cannot close more than the back teeth will allow, feed the pup plenty of bones so he can grind his canines down and see how you go.

  9. #9

    Default

    Yes, I was told to feed my Amstaff pup lots of bones and give her plenty to chew on to help with jaw and teeth development and my vet said the same. He said that the jaw will be still growing and developing for some time and that is why chewing and grinding, etc. can help to reduce the overbite. I am sure her jaw and teeth have benefited and her adult teeth look much whiter and stronger than her baby teeth and even her gums look much better than when she was tiny.

    Thanks for the comment Minibulls Mum - makes sense.

  10. #10

    Default

    Cathy - your Amstaff is beautiful!
    Thanks for the advice and well wishes.

    We haven’t had any suggestions on how to improve the condition aside from having his teeth – which we have done.

    Minibulls mum
    Our little man had holes in the roof of his mouth there his teeth pierced his palette…I wanted those bottom canines out straight away after seeing that.

    Any further advise on how to help the situation in the future, with the arrival of his adult teeth, would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks

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