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Thread: Boxer Training

  1. #1

    Default Boxer Training

    hi all,

    I own a boxer and it had undergone severe humiliation by previous owner.i want my boxer to bounce back, at this stage she is very quite, scared and too friendly to strangers.. she doesn't even bark


    can u guys throw some light for bounce back process.....


    regards
    bell

  2. #2

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    Time is a great healer......
    But along the healing process I find keeping a strong routine helps reasure them alot.
    Heaps of praise & go at the dogs pace at this stage.
    Be consistant in your approch & bring plenty of paitence to any interaction with the dog.
    Good luck.
    Dogs make everyday life enjoyable...........

  3. #3
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    I agree with CD...plenty of social contact, but don't force it and maybe initially keep some distance.
    the one thing that i found with my newfie girl, who also had a hellish previous life, is that It was best not to pet or be nice to her when she was anxious or nervous. i used to pretend nothing was happening and ignore her when she did that. I would just go on normally.
    i also found agility type exercises, such as plank walking, drum on side tunnel and Table a great confidence builder for her. We would be happy and exited if she managed any of it. even now, when she has a stress moment at the Kennel Club, I use a table/box which is especially set up at the Club for her and we run over to it and play silly exited when she get on it plus a food reward. it is also her reward when she does really good things. The table is now used by several other trainers. it made them all laugh when it came out initially, but now a lot of them see how it works for reward and confidence.
    I think the height, about 1' and the fun have helped it be what it is.
    Ours is a box made out of pallet timber with a rubber mat on top. About 2' square and 1' high. Now permanently resides at the kennel club. we also have several at home that are a little bigger. All the dogs love them, but the nervous anxious dogs gain confidence. it is all about play and happy times

    .

    Annabelle on one of her boxes
    Pets are forever

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Northern NSW
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    Quote Originally Posted by bell2609 View Post
    it had undergone severe humiliation by previous owner.
    bell
    Hey Bell.

    How do you know this history?

    Can you give some examples of this "severe humiliation"?

    How long has she been with you?

    Other dogs at home?

    I agree with most of CD's post, time, patience & routine are all needed here. As is modifying techniques to suit her unique situation.


    Perhaps ease up on praise till she has settled into your pack routine, Sure praise when it's appropriate, but don't smother her in it......Wait till her nature & trust has reached a more even keel.

    So much really depends on what she has experienced & learned from the previous owner.

    As for bouncing back......I'd be aiming at 2 steps forward & one step back, at least till things are settled for her
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  5. #5
    Join Date
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    I adopted my step brothers boxer when he moved to Melbourne, and he was very much the same; quiet, shy, didn't bark, wouldn't play with the other dogs. But seeing as he was put in the yard straight away with my other two dogs, slowly he started to show his colours.

    It does take quite some time and patience, and practice. The other dogs would pick on him (playfully of course) and he would just take it, but now he gets them back and runs with them when they chase a ball etc.

    I find that Boxers can be very shy dogs to start off with. A friend of mine went through the same thing with her Boxer.

    Just give him plenty of love and encouragement and he will come around.
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  6. #6

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    Good point about no praise at inaproprate times. I was not very clear but more meant look for things to praise but yes don't smother them.
    I also agree other dogs help the healing heaps.
    The planks is a great idea that I am going to keep in mind myself for the future
    Dogs make everyday life enjoyable...........

  7. #7
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    Melbourne
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    Boxers as a rule, are not "barkers". They are silent sentinels that will let you into their home, but will not let you out.

    They have a tendancy to "guard" you by sitting facing anyone that they are unfamiliar with, almost with their bottom on your feet... be honoured by this when it happens (it will), as it means she has accepted you into her heart.

    Boxers are incredibly loyal and super intelligent. Work to her strengths, and get her out walking regularly. It clears the mind and works out the stresses. Don't introduce new animals to her in her yard, ahve them come along on walks, meeting you on the footpath. ALso, try to avoid taking her into new situations unless you yourself are 100% calm, because she will "read" your stress and reflect it back.

    Boxers can also tend towards being very "people shy" - Rosie certainly is. The trick to new people is to have them come in and ignore her. When she is ready, she will approach. Don't let you visitors make a fuss over her, as that can reinforce her shyness; you want her to not so much be proactive around new people, but be 100% accepting that anyone that you allow into your home is OK, and she dosn't have to freak out over it.

    You han't identified where you are - if youare in Melb, I'm quite happy for Rosie to come to meet for a walk, as she is submissive and won't overwork your doglet with excitement...

  8. #8
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    I thought quiet and friendly were good things? Not sure about the scared, like the others said, it can take a while for a dog to settle in a new home.

  9. #9
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    It was best not to pet or be nice to her when she was anxious or nervous. i used to pretend nothing was happening and ignore her when she did that. I would just go on normally
    Great advise here, never try to 'reasure' a timid or maybe scared dog.

    Boxers do not often bark much at all so no saying that is a bad thing.

    Pinkest is right on, and unless you have proof this dog was abused do not think this is why she is as she is.

    whatever you do you must not go all 'sensitive and understanding human wise' dogs do not respond to this type of reasurance, do as others have said and ignore any uncertain behaviour, give her time she will be right

  10. #10
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    I have a near neighbour whose boxer barks at everything that walks past, and sometimes just howls. It's a very dog aggressive boxer too. And they just got it a puppy friend - another boxer. I'm a bit worried that while he's quiet and friendly that he will pick up on her anxieties and bad habits.

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