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Thread: Introducing?

  1. #1
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    Default Introducing?

    Hi

    We might be moving soon, to a place where the owners will be regularly staying in the cabins behind the house and bringing their Golden X Poodle. They want to introduce them soon, but they have said that Ivy ( the Golden Poodle X) will most likely snap at her to begin with, to put her in her place, and then will be fine with her. With Lacey so young I don't want to frighten her so that it will stick with her the rest of her life. She is sixteen weeks old now, so just at the end of her first fear period. But if we do take this house it is inevitable that they meet and play with each other, as the owners will be up there every third weekend or so for a weekend break. So what should I make sure happens when they meet, so Lacey isn't scared? She is usually timid if they bark at her when she meets them. Should Ivy be on a lead?

  2. #2

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    Hi Brit,

    IF you guys do take the house tryto meet Ivy first without Lacey.

    Regarding the lead it really depends on Ivy some dogs are more aggressive onlead, I know this because I have one, I would never introduce Keira to dogs with her on the lead because it would be more likely for her to be very agrressive where as off lead she is fine and wants to play. Maybe they can meet through a fence first that way no one is on lead and Ivy cannot get to her, if they start fence running playfully together and no one is posturing etc you can then put them together.

    GL

  3. #3
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    Have already met Ivy, she is a nice enough dog but a bit standoffish to start with. I like the fence idea.

  4. #4
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    I don't like when people think that letting a dog snap at another is "putting it in it's place". If it was me meeting this dog i'd immediately tell the dog who is about to snap "no" and get the owner to pull him back a little, or do the Cesar Milan bite (works for me with bf's dad's excited lab that's always desperate for attention). You also have to introduce them when they're both calm (and not excited or fearful). I'm sure the Golden x Poodle is a nice enough dog but honestly it doesn't sound like the owners trained her too well. The fence idea also sounds good if the other dog is too much of a handful for the owner to control on leash.

    Hope the meeting goes well

  5. #5

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    Lol thanks MTA i forgot that. Yeah definitely make sure the dogs are both in a calm state maybe organise for both to have big long walks prior to meeting. Also make sure there are no toys etc around as I remember u mentioning lacey can get a bit toy possessive in another forum but just in general its good not to have anything around either might think of as theirs. I agree with Tea the quick "bite" to the neck thay Cesar uses is effective as long as u use it at the right time so keep this up ur sleeve. Im surr it will go fine dont let their dog snap at urs without some sort of correction just because they think its just a putting ur dog in its place thing. GL

  6. #6
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    they have said that Ivy ( the Golden Poodle X) will most likely snap at her to begin with, to put her in her place
    I really don't like this attitude from the owners. But at the same time it is reasonable for an older dog to tell an overly bouncy puppy to back off if it invades the older dog's space uninvited. You see how two dogs greet each other and start play - a dog should be able to read when her invitation is not returned or appreciated and leave the other dog alone - without any need for a "snap" from the other dog.

    So the way to get this to happen if you're not sure a puppy will understand - is to get the puppy to hold a drop down position and allow the other dog to approach and sniff if they want on loose lead. If the other dog does not want to approach - it's best not to force the issue. And it is really really important to stop the puppy from jumping up to play and bounce before the sniffing is completed. This is especially true for greetings from fearful dogs who freak out, or older dogs who are easily hurt by boisterous puppies.

    I really would never let dogs where one may "snap" greet off lead even if a dog is aggressive because of the lead and would be "fine off the lead". Because if it starts going to hell, it's much harder to separate dogs off lead. If they're on lead and you're paying attention, you can separate them before it gets as far as a fight.

    But the leads on both dogs have to be loose - you must not reward a pulling dog by letting it continue to approach. Both dogs must be calm and no pulling. Which might slow things down a bit but better safe than sorry. Dogs freak out on a tight lead because they feel their options for flight are taken from them so they will more likely fight.

    I would also be tempted to associate the meeting with a lot of roast chicken... ie both dogs get lots of treats from their owners for being calm and not pulling and not lunging and being good and keeping loose on the lead. This only works if neither dog fights over food.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 01-10-2011 at 01:15 PM.

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