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Thread: You Probably Get Alot of These, but Beginer Dog Breeds? :D

  1. #11
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    May 2009
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    Victoria
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    I agree MDD. No breed is 'prone to barking'.

    Peta, you're probly used to excitible working Kelpies. My grandpas 4 working Kelpies are tied up when they arn't being used and will bark all day until they are taken for a run on the motorbike or taken for work.
    If they are used during the day, they wont make a peep once they get home.
    Oh, except for when its dinner time.
    Any breed would do that though.
    Education not Legislation

  2. #12
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    Jul 2009
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    Sydney
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    Based on that information, I'd say definitely no to a Miniature Pinscher. They do NOT cope well with being outdoors at all; they are extremely sensitive to the cold.

    A Schnauzer, Bichon Frise, Staffordshire or Cairn Terrier may fit your needs.


    like a rolling thunder chasing the wind...

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post

    Heres a list of dog breeds for beginners;
    Chihuahua, Pomeranian, Pekingese, Yorkshire Terrier, Maltese, Silky Terrier, Australian Terrier, Tibet Spaniel, Norfolk Terrier, Lhasa Apso, Westie, Pug, Shih Tzu, Basset, Dachshund, Scottish Terrier, Papillon, Whippet, Sheltie, Havanese, Mini Pinscher, Border Terrier, King Charles Spaniel, Welsh Corgi, Bichon Frisé, Cairn Terrier, Toy Poodle, Tibet Terrier, Cocker Spaniel, Bedlington Terrier, Mini Schnauzer, Collie, Samoyed, Bearded Collie, Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever, Flat Coated Retriever.
    Cripes? Beginners dogs? No offence Myf, but geez. There are a great many more suitable breeds. Some of these are highly specialised breeds that have very particular needs.

    np9490 have you considered a rescue dog? If you check out sites like PetRescue - find your new best friend! you can view a stack of dogs, of many and mixed breeds. The benefit of rescue dogs is that they've generally spent some time in foster homes and their carers have a good knowledge of their personalities so they can help match the dog to your situation. You also get all the vetwork done with them.

  4. #14
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    Sep 2010
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    Gippsland, Victoria
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    You know, I think just about any breed ( with some exceptions particularly in the toy group, and maybe Afghan Hounds, lol) could fit your parents' criteria... What I mean is, research breeds and pick one that is suitable for you and your lifestyle (grooming, feeding, exercise and training needs), then invest heavily in things like a kennel and shelter, fencing (if needed), perhaps a play pen if a smaller breed, and find an obedience club/ trainer you like to get some great training under yours and your Dog's belts... Have you decided whether you'd like to adopt an older dog, or is your heart set on a puppy? Puppies, obviously, need to be 'inside' whilst very young. It is also going to depend quite heavily on the climate where you live.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nattylou View Post
    Cripes? Beginners dogs? No offence Myf, but geez. There are a great many more suitable breeds. Some of these are highly specialised breeds that have very particular needs.

    np9490 have you considered a rescue dog? If you check out sites like PetRescue - find your new best friend! you can view a stack of dogs, of many and mixed breeds. The benefit of rescue dogs is that they've generally spent some time in foster homes and their carers have a good knowledge of their personalities so they can help match the dog to your situation. You also get all the vetwork done with them.
    I actually started my own list, but then felt I was missing a lot, so I just got that off the internet.
    I saw Samoyed, Sheltie and Collie in particular and thought surely not! But then couldn't be bothered to do another search confirming beginner dogs.
    I guess you just did it for me!
    Education not Legislation

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    I agree MDD. No breed is 'prone to barking'.

    Peta, you're probly used to excitible working Kelpies. My grandpas 4 working Kelpies are tied up when they arn't being used and will bark all day until they are taken for a run on the motorbike or taken for work.
    If they are used during the day, they wont make a peep once they get home.
    Oh, except for when its dinner time.
    Any breed would do that though.
    Yeah Skip isn't a barky kelpie.. If something is scarying her she will bark. OH can tied her up at the sale yards and she won't even bark, even thou their is about 5 another dogs running around doing sheep work.

  7. #17

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    I agree with the suggestion to look on the Petrescue website as a lot of dogs there can come with a lot of information and I found that the women we dealt with was able to give us lots of advice.

    The only thing I would say is make sure if you do get a dog there that it is what you want and can look after as it can take time to settle in.I am not having a go at anyone but it is a sore subject with me at the moment as I have seen so many rescue dogs looking for another home.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by molly33 View Post
    Are you a first time dog owner?

    Yes.

  9. #19

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    Ok. Then I would suggest as a family to sit down with some dog books and research.
    Then once you have decided I would then read up as much as you can about the breed, maybe even visit some dog shows. This way if you go for a pure breed the breeder should be more helpful. Breeders put a lot of work into their dogs and want to make sure that you understand their care and needs. Another avenue is breed specific rescue again you will need to understand the breed. And my fav is adoption. You will need to visit some shelters and find reputable rescue groups. With Some rescue groups you may need to fill out an application form and be honest with your answers. There is no point in taking on a dog if you cannot fulfill its needs. There is way more to pet ownership than picking up the business and walking.
    Take your time as there is no hurry and remember a dog is for life.

  10. #20

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    Most people start researching breeds by finding the breeds that they find visually attractive. That gives you a start point at least. Then find out details about them and whether they suit you. This further research can lead to you discovering things about other breeds that you didn't know, and you will start to look at them as well.

    The internet is fantastic for researching this stuff, start with looking at pictures - which is always fun! Then start reading about ifferent dogs that catch your eye and go from there. The information is boundless. If you have any specific things you want to know about particular breeds and can't find, forums like this are great for connecting with other dog owners.

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