Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31

Thread: Boy or Girl?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

    Default

    I see and work with a lot of males and females of a huge variety of dog breeds.
    Not all female humans are the same, not all male humans are the same, so why would all male dogs be the same and all female dogs be the same?

    Its all personal preference IMO.
    Education not Legislation

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    There's a lot more border collies doing competition dog sports than Amstaff.

    Amstaff can be prone to dog aggression with ugly consequences. There are plenty of dog aggressive border collies around too, but they're easier to pull out of a fight than an amstaff ie an Amstaff would easily win vs a BC at tug of war. And a BC is more likely to respond to an owner "no matter what", when appropriately trained.

    Do some research on Breed Specific Legislation eg BSL - which is often interpreted to outlaw anything that "looks like a pitbull", which includes Amstaff and Amstaff x. Amstaff have been selectively bred away from aggressive tendencies in recent years (the last 50 or so?), so an Amstaff with ANKC papers (not council registration papers or vet vaccination papers), can be "proven" to be "not a pitbull". Pitbulls automatically qualify for all the horrors that go with "restricted breed" or "dangerous dog" - check your local council dog laws.

    Personally, while I've met a lot of amstaff looking dogs, I would avoid (oops I got a black and white spotty one), because of the dangers of dangerous dog breed restrictions. It's like owning a souped up Nissan Skyline. Everybody looks at it like it's about to do something dangerous and illegal.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,635

    Default

    Border collies can be high maintenance dogs and they can also have behavioural issues, particularly if not trained and exercised appropriately. I know a few snappy and aggressive BCs. In general they are great dogs but just because they are smart doesnt make them easy dogs, quite the opposite sometimes.

    On the question of which sex. I have both. Downside of males is their peeing on all and sundry. Temperament depends on the dog. I have had very bossy high drive females and more submissive females, same with the boys. The females tend to mature earlier.

    My boy are sweet and loving. My Koolie is easy to train and listens, my male BC is much more of a hot head and takes more repitions for him to catch on although is is very enthusiastic.

    I preference is probably for the girls.

    Sir Bongalot - as to maleness giving a dog more initiative - sorry but IMO I totally disagree! Tell that to my female ACDS who can totally outsmart my boys at every move. They are a coniving determined pair and are most defintiely not boring. If there is a puzzle to be solved or mischief to be had, it is usually my ACD girls LOL. They would also be the first to lay down their lives to protect me, while the boys were running for the hills. I know some wonderful working bred labrador females who are top of the game in retrieving, plenty of heart, drive and initiative. Still it is all a matter of personal experience
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 10-26-2010 at 12:45 AM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    808

    Default

    Hi,

    I have two boys and I love them. Well I see a lot of good bitches at the dog parks, and i would prefer a bitch to a dog in the future. I however hear dogs are better with toileting (my dogs are also 100% toilet trained)....I am not sure if something has to do with physical difference.
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  5. #15

    Default

    If you get a pure or even a cross Amstaff, please ensure both parents have been tested for "ataxia". This is a horrible disease that I wouldn't wish upon any dog or owner.

    If the "breeder" can't supply you with evidence that the parents have been tested, then run in the opposite direction as fast as you can.

    Symptoms may not show up until a dog is 4 years or even older so don't think just because the parents look healthy, that the pup doesn't have this dreadful disease. How sad would it be to have a beautiful family member for years, only to have to put it to sleep because of a disease that could have been easily prevented.

    The test is relatively cheap so there is no excuse for people not to test their dogs.

    Please do a lot of research into the breeds you are interested in, and remember that getting a cross doesn't gaurantee that you will get the best of both parents, you may be getting the worse of the two.

  6. #16

    Default

    Hi,

    I have five dogs - a six year old spayed female toy poodle - very high strung, breed wise, but lovely dog and not moody. Loving and loyal. By far the smartest of the lot, but the trade-off is she can be a stress head.

    A two year old neutred male great dane cross - very steady, calm and affectionate, handles life with unflappable calm. Runs and jumps like a steeplechaser out in the bush, but won't even do the most basic agility even for food, he loves food, but sees jumping over something for a snack completely undesirable. After the boss toy poodle, he is the 2IC of the pack.

    Brother and sister rottie x shepherds - six months old and will be desexed in December.
    The female is the more outgoing, but her two other sisters were much more so. The male is sooky, quiet and really loving and sensitive, the opposite of the other male in the litter. They live to herd all the other dogs in the dog park.

    A seven month old male standard poodle, will remain entire until about a year old, for the breeder to use for registered breeding. He is the dopiest, yet cleverest, yet mellow
    dog. Like the toy poodle, he loves to learn tricks and picks up any training super-fast. He is completely submissive to any and every dog he meets. He is the happy go lucky bottom of the pack dude.

    I know it's a small sample, but you can see the variation in sex and breed is not cut and dried. In every litter of every breed or cross breed, there are different energy or personality pups, so being able to pick the one that suits you and your lifestyle is a good start. Going for an adult dog, they are all going to have a reasonably set energy level.

    Obviously an established pure breed has more predictable traits and it is a matter of looking closely at what the dog was originally bred for and what it excels at today. But within these litters, there will still be the more dominant or higher drive pups vs. the followers and mellow pups.

    As far as amstaffs go, like the comments by those more knowledgeable than me, a papered (ANKC) amstaff is not an issue re - rangers or BSL. As for clubs that snub them, they are not worth going to anyway. Any 'powerful' breed can be an issue if not properly socialised with dogs and people and if people want to stare because you have a GSD, or a rottie, amstaff, etc, they are often doing so due to ignorance or media myths. It depends whether you are willing to be a focus of that kind of attention.

    Finally, as far as amstaffs and aggression, I have never had a problem with either amstaffs or staffys at our local dog park (only my personal experience in six months almost daily and with a busy dog park). I have had issues with cross breeds, and some other breeds of various sizes ( I won't mention specifics as I take every dog as an individual). I have found the amstaffs and staffys (all well socialised with aware owners) to be an especially playful, curious and forgiving type of dog, not easily offended and pretty energetic. Without fail, the problem dogs of whatever breed have been with owners who either didn't give a damn, or were just overwhelmed by their own dog's behaviour.

    Finally, pure bred dogs from a reputable breeder (make sure you research them, cross reference and see what their peers think of them) or rescue dogs are both viable options IMHO. Backyard breeders and pet shops are the ones to avoid, due to their lack of concern for the welfare of the dogs themselves. Also, just because a cross sounds good in theory, you can only make an educated guess at how well it would work in reality.

    Well, that's my 2c worth, lol.

    Would love to hear how it all goes, whatever you decide. Comes down to personal preference and training......

    Cathy.

  7. #17

    Default

    i have to say the amount of information through this forum is incredible. i havent googled this much in ages.....
    I have 2 girls with very different personalities. i think it all comes down to the dog itself.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,635

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hachna View Post
    Hi,

    I have two boys and I love them. Well I see a lot of good bitches at the dog parks, and i would prefer a bitch to a dog in the future. I however hear dogs are better with toileting (my dogs are also 100% toilet trained)....I am not sure if something has to do with physical difference.
    I have found the opposite. I can leave my bitches all day in the house and they are 100% reliable and were extremely quick to train. My young boys will mark in the house, but only when I am not there! They are my first boys - any suggestions anyone? How does one stop marking in the house! I can never seem to catch them at it, so I crate them when they are indoors.

    As to staffys and Am staffs. I know a couple of am staffs as a friend breeds and shows them and they are very nice dogs. I also know quite a few staffys and they are very high energy dogs and seem quite nice. I only know one really aggressive one and that is becuase his teenage owner thought it was funny to encourage him to fight other dogs. They would not be a breed that would suit me, but are very popular over here and are fun loving and energetic.

  9. #19

    Default

    Definitely agree that females are easier to toilet train!

    I have 2 males and 1 female and both my boys have had accidents in the house while my girl is very clean and sits patiently by the door when she needs to go out.

    I find boys in general to be more lively than the girls, especially in their older years. All the boys I've had have still been like puppies when they were over 6 years old while the girls tended to mellow out and be couch potatoes.
    In saying that though there's always odd ones out, my mum had a Great Dane girl that was like a puppy unil the day she died.

    At the dog park my male poodle will play fetch... constantly, no matter how long we are there for. My female poodle will immediately head for the trees to do some sniffing and once she has done a lap and worn her nose out she comes back and just says 'hello' to any other dogs there.

  10. #20

    Default

    All this information is fantastic!
    Thankyou!
    Come December i think I will be very well informed and confident in my decision.
    ...Now I just have to get my partner to read thru all this, so he is just as informed!

    I look forward to posting a picture of my beautiful pup come the end of the year.

    Thank you!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •