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Thread: Companion Dog - What Can You Do and Where Can You Go?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    South Australia
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    Default Companion Dog - What Can You Do and Where Can You Go?

    Hello

    Some already know I just adopted a beautiful 3 year old dog from the RSPCA called Neddie. He is very well behaved and is a jack russell x australian terrier.

    Neddie is my first dog and I'm just wondering what the general etiquette is for companion dogs? What is acceptable? I went to a cafe yesterday, sat outside and asked if it was ok for Neddie to sit as well, which they were fine with.

    Quite keen to hear where you take your dog and what you think is ok and what isn't ok?

    Thanks
    Kristy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    Hi,

    -To clean after your dog is a must IMO
    -To have your dog on leash unless a place states otherwise
    -To work on basic commands such as sit/down/stay/come/wait etc is a good idea. I am big on recall (come) at the off leash dog park (I think this is a requirement according to the sign post at dog parks in NSW, but I do not think anybody is that much into it-recall will save you from tricky moments)

    I think you are a very good dog owner. Good luck!!!
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  3. #3

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    Where your dog can go is at the discretion on the business.

    Some cafes have no problem with you sitting outside with your dog, others may ask you to leave.

    ANY stores that sell food items (even just a packet of chips) are not allowed to have dogs inside.
    Stores that do not sell food (like hardware stores for example) can have dogs inside, but again, it's up to them to decide whether or not to allow it, and IMO you shouldn't let a dog walk around on the ground, it should be picked up and carried.

    I go to a horse shop regularly and they have no problem with me bringing my pup in, they even tell me to pop him up on the counter so they can all go ga ga over him.

    You learn pretty quick which stores are fine with pets and which aren't. The worst that can happen is they ask you to leave.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    What Hachna said

    pick up after your dog.

    keep him on lead unless it's your place or off lead is permitted. If there is sport being played on an oval, keep him on lead. Dogs seem to have an uncanny way of knowing exactly the most embarrassing place to be or crap and going there.

    Teach him manners, practice manners (ie so he remembers), do not allow him to approach or be approached by small children unless under very close supervision. Get him to drop first if you can. A lot of mums and small children are afraid of dogs. Don't make that worse by allowing him to charge them. Says me - whose evil hound barked a lot (from a safe distance of 3m) at a lady in a sari with a pram. I think the sari freaked my dog out. The lady acted frightened but said she was ok. I put my EH on lead. Bad dog.

    I like to go to parks, beach, friends places and some sports grounds (grassy ones) with dog. Whether she gets out at freinds places or sports grounds - depends a lot on many things.

    We also go to dog training twice a week. One obedience, one agility.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crested_Love View Post
    Some cafes have no problem with you sitting outside with your dog, others may ask you to leave.
    God bless Europe for this! Most of caffes nad restaurants accept dogs, especially if you're in Germany, Austria or Netherlands where you can go just about ANYWHERE, even to hospital with your dog, ride on a bus/train, go shopping.
    Respect and you shall be respected. Animal is always right.

  6. #6

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    I think dogs at Cafe's is a wonderful thing as long as the dog is well behaved. Nobody likes to have a dog jumping on them and that goes for other dogs too that may be laying there being good.

    I take my young Rottie to as many places as possible because she loves meeting new people and dogs but as she's still young I keep her on a harness and lead and don't allow her to irritate anyone.

    I think the main thing is keeping your dog under control and teachig it good manners.

  7. #7

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    In Austria dogs are allowed on bus/tram/train/cafe etc. However it must be muzzled at all times. And everyone does it. So yes dogs are everywhere, but they are all on leash and all muzzled. We lived there for a while. They would be really shocked at the way Australians let their dogs wander and are often off leash.

  8. #8
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    Yes I found dogs were everywhere in Europe. As was dog crap, especially in France. And one guy was doing a 6 hour train ride with his puppy and yes- it had an accident on the seat - argh. And the guy had taken our reserved seat, fortunately he got forced to move before the accident happened, or I'm not sure where we could have sat if the train was full.

    But it was all taken in stride by train staff. The owner was very apologetic. Must happen with small children too.

    I did find the dogs were much better behaved than most Australian dogs. Ie they stayed close to their owners or were on lead. And they didn't snap or try to sniff at anything.

  9. #9
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    Dec 2009
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    South Australia
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    Thank you everyone for your information. We are working on training at the moment. I don't know if to ask this here or search for info from the forum, but what do you do when Neddie pulls to go towards every dog or cat he sees on a walk, then growls or snaps if they come too close?

    I have read contradicting information. Spray bottle, but he already seems to be scared of water so am hesitant to use this method. Walking the opposite direction, but if he is pulling sideways not sure how this helps. Or yanking on the lead and saying no or leave it.

    What do you think?

  10. #10
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    Hi Fitnhealthy

    You can try all methods until you find what works for you and your dog.

    I find blocking helps a lot with my dog. I block her view of the whatever exciting thing it is, and feed her a treat each time she pays attention to me instead of it. Turning and going the other way and only returning when the dog has calmed down also helps.

    Don't reward the dog for the bad behaviour by allowing it to continue pulling in the direction of its hearts desire - or the dog is in control, and not you and things will get worse.

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