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Thread: Boyfriend's Crazy Dog.

  1. #1

    Default Boyfriend's Crazy Dog.

    My boyfriend's dog is a bit of a nutcase. I don't know if she is de-sexed, but she's quite aggressive. She is a 14 years old but I don't know her breed.. she looks like a fox terrier cross something else..

    Anyway, I visit my boyfriend's house often for the last week and a half now and every time i visit, their dog seems to show some sort of aggression towards me whether its growling, snarling, barking, and twice now she has gone to bite me. I'm getting quite sick of it because even if I go somewhere in the house on my own (like upstairs to his room to get my phone), she follows me and I keep thinking she's going attack me or something.

    A lot of the time I ignore her and pretend she's not there.. the other night I hugged my boyfriend and we were standing next to a lounge she was sitting on and I didn't know she was there.. anyway, my hands were on his lower back and she jumped up onto the arm of the lounge and bit my hand. There was absolutely NO provocation whatsoever. I got angry and stormed up to his room to sulk and yelled at him saying "You shouldn't have let your dog grow up with that behavior!"

    I really don't know how to deal with this behavior from her. I really am not afraid of her or show any form of stress, I just get purely annoyed because I'd like to visit my boyfriends house without the worry of being bitten by a dog. Oh, she is an inside dog so I don't think we can lock her outside while I'm there.

  2. #2
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    Next time you go around, and every time, take a snack bag of chopped roast chicken with you. Buy or roast a chicken - chop it all up, eat some - freeze little packets of dog treats. This also works with fried liver, or roast beef etc etc. Even fresh mince. But for now you need UBER wonderful treat. Eg roast chicken. No bones.

    So do not stare at the dog. Do look obliquely at the dog. Initially when you come in, throw some roast chicken behind the dog so it has to go back to get the chicken. Then get the dog to work for the chicken. Eg sit before it can have some. Sit and take its nose away from your hand and it can have some. Say "yes" or "good" each time you give the dog some chicken and it will associate the word with good things. And it will associate you with good things.

    It seems to me that this dog is quite jealous of the attention your BF gives you instead of it. If you get the training too right it may become jealous of the attention your BF gives you and start guarding you instead. But ideally it should associate you being with BF with feeling good. Eg roast chicken. If you can come with a squeaky toy or a squirrel dude or everlast fun ball - stuffed with roast chicken and dinner kibble - then hopefully the dog will eventually see you as part of his pack and not competition.

    I always have treats for my dog at the park, and all the dogs at the park know it. Several dogs are quite agressive about food but they always share gracefully and without complaining with my dog - because 1. she's a groveller (she doesn't care who is boss dog), and 2. They get no treats unless she's there and they're being nice to her.

    So you let evil terrier know you have good things, and the way to get good things is to be nice to you. If dog barks or growls or jumps on you, turn your back and ignore for as long as it takes for quiet to resume, then say "good" or "yes" and reward.

    Let us know how it goes.

  3. #3
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    She sounds very jealous. Your boyfriend needs to let her know that is not acceptable behaviour- what did he do when she bit you?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Next time you go around, and every time, take a snack bag of chopped roast chicken with you. Buy or roast a chicken - chop it all up, eat some - freeze little packets of dog treats. This also works with fried liver, or roast beef etc etc. Even fresh mince. But for now you need UBER wonderful treat. Eg roast chicken. No bones.

    So do not stare at the dog. Do look obliquely at the dog. Initially when you come in, throw some roast chicken behind the dog so it has to go back to get the chicken. Then get the dog to work for the chicken. Eg sit before it can have some. Sit and take its nose away from your hand and it can have some. Say "yes" or "good" each time you give the dog some chicken and it will associate the word with good things. And it will associate you with good things.

    It seems to me that this dog is quite jealous of the attention your BF gives you instead of it. If you get the training too right it may become jealous of the attention your BF gives you and start guarding you instead. But ideally it should associate you being with BF with feeling good. Eg roast chicken. If you can come with a squeaky toy or a squirrel dude or everlast fun ball - stuffed with roast chicken and dinner kibble - then hopefully the dog will eventually see you as part of his pack and not competition.

    I always have treats for my dog at the park, and all the dogs at the park know it. Several dogs are quite agressive about food but they always share gracefully and without complaining with my dog - because 1. she's a groveller (she doesn't care who is boss dog), and 2. They get no treats unless she's there and they're being nice to her.

    So you let evil terrier know you have good things, and the way to get good things is to be nice to you. If dog barks or growls or jumps on you, turn your back and ignore for as long as it takes for quiet to resume, then say "good" or "yes" and reward.

    Let us know how it goes.
    Thanks Hyacinth, this works well for so many areas. It makes sense the way you put that theory.

  5. #5
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    I should have mentioned - no roast chicken *bones* - cooked bones are really bad for dogs.

  6. #6

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    Hi Hyacinth, thank you for your response, I'll definitely try that next time! Honestly, a lot of the time I ignore her but often if she's sniffing me ill lean down, let her sniff my hand, then pat her on the back or something. I've fed her and refilled her water bowl a few times as well.

    Yes Tina, I say she was very jealous! I don't think my boyfriend responded the right way, he gave her attention instead of me. When he put his hand out to her after pushing me off him so I wouldn't get bitten again, she tried to bite him as well. Then, he goes "come on, lets go outside" and he walked her outside then came back.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Libbeth View Post
    Hi Hyacinth, thank you for your response, I'll definitely try that next time! Honestly, a lot of the time I ignore her but often if she's sniffing me ill lean down, let her sniff my hand, then pat her on the back or something. I've fed her and refilled her water bowl a few times as well.

    Yes Tina, I say she was very jealous! I don't think my boyfriend responded the right way, he gave her attention instead of me. When he put his hand out to her after pushing me off him so I wouldn't get bitten again, she tried to bite him as well. Then, he goes "come on, lets go outside" and he walked her outside then came back.
    Hi Libbeth
    great to see you checking back in.

    Some dogs prefer to be patted under the chin and around the chest area but if this one accepts a pat on the back, that's good. A lot of dogs love a scratch/rub around the ears or above and around where the tail meets the back end. If you find the sweet spot, the dog will be all yours.

    BF definitely didn't help the situation by pushing you off, letting her try to bite him and then taking her for a "walk". I guess he meant well, not wanting you to get hurt, but the dog got its way.

    Load the BF up with a few treats, and get him to make evil hound work for attention eg sit, speak, roll over, shake hands etc etc. Telling her "oops" in a neutral voice (not yelling), or making a growly "bah" again - not loudly, just normal volume and putting her on the ground and ignoring her, is the best way to deal with her behaving badly. If she continues to seek attention, try standing up together and ignoring her - no looking at her or talking to her until she behaves again.

    If she's really persistant - then shut her out. But I prefer the idea of bribing her with loads of treats, and encouraging good behaviour rather than having to punish the bad behaviour.

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