Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Behavioural Issues

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default Behavioural Issues

    Hi everyone - have been a reader of this forum for a while and but my hand is finally being forced and it is now time to become an active member.

    I am having beavioural issues with my two dogs (mini dachshund and large bitza - apparently mastiff x?).

    Would anyone mind if I posted my current situation so I can get some advice from the obviously experienced members here?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Lala Land!!!
    Posts
    1,226

    Default

    unless something has changed that is the point of these places.
    Have at it!! Whats your Bitza Baby doing thats not to your likeing??

    Breeding, Showing, Training and general crazy making!!!
    If you seek understanding listen to the music, not the song.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I will start at the beginning - have had Indi (short for India - the bitza - a rescue dog) for about 4 months now, she has always been slightly nervous. This has recently escalated to growling and barking at people, she has fought with Sam (the min dac). I have tried training at large training days and in smaller classes, I had to remove her from the latter as she was over excited and trying to attack another dog. Today I took her to a behavioural vet and she was diagnosed with a mental disorder - anxiety - proposed treatment includes medication, behaviour modification and constant management.

    The kicker here is that I have a newborn at home (non fur baby) and am concerned I don't have the time to correct her behaviour. My wife certainly doesn't and the Mother in Law whilst she has the best intentions, is not the right person to help her. I don't want to give her up but am concerned I may have to......

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

    Default

    Hmmm, well I don't know what you want to do then.
    Anxiety is something that needs a lot of time and dedication to manage, but you already say you may not have time for it....
    Has the medication helped at all?
    Education not Legislation

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Haven't started the medication yet - consult was today - have to have blood test prior to getting the perscription.

    I understand the time requirements to train strong willed dogs - but the constant management and associated stress is a concern.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    4,241

    Default

    Ok well do you know what kind of anxiety it is?
    Noise, seperation or social?
    IMO, from what you have said, it seems like a social thing.

    Reasons for anxiety include and change in routine, previous owners, some kind of trauma as a young puppy(like being taken away from their mother too early) and even some breeds are prone to anxiety, so all of these are possible reasons for Indi(being a rescue)

    I you could share more information I think we could help you a little more.
    Education not Legislation

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Wow just lost an entire post as I was logged out......here it is again:

    Indi was rescued from the SDCH and has always shown some nervousness. I quizzed them about this but they were unable to give me any info re. why she was given up, her background etc.

    I will start with saying that she is incredibly friendly with my family and people she knows. I can take bones out of her mouth, her food bowl away from and she does not show any form of aggression. She is desexed

    I initially took her to the local kennel club training (lots of dogs) and the first response was good. But she quickly became over excited and I could not hold or regain her attention - food treats did not work. I persisted until she eventually was choking herself with trying to get to the other dogs and I was disrupting the classes. I stopped going at this point.

    The first sign of aggression was following her first class, we had just arrived home and the neighbours cam around to say hello (they are cat people and were nervous). Indi responded by backing away, tail between legs, hackles raised, growling and barking. I removed her from the situation.

    I enrolled her in a smaller class (6 dogs) and this didn't go well. At her first class she started off ok but quickly got over excited so I took her outside for a walk to calm down. On the second attempt, another dog growled at her and she immediately lunged / growled / barked at him. She is a 30kg puppy so she took some strength to control. I then removed her from the class.

    Following this I took her to the behavioural vet and am in my current position.

    She has started to show increasing nervousness towards people she is meeting for the first time, growling and barking - like today at the vet. Incident where she growls or barks at other dosg when being walked on lead are increasing.

    Thoughts?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    305

    Default

    What did the trainers say at the school about removing her from classes?

    I am in a similar situation. My dog was a rescue, we have had her for one year, and she barks at other dogs. She is completely non aggressive though and once the dog approaches she plays with them.

    If I am walking her past a house that has a dog and she barks, I make her sit and stop barking. Then she gets praise, once she is quiet and calm. If this takes half an hour, then so be it. Is it embarrassing? Yes. But I do it anyway. I find that when we walk everyday and get that practice she learns very quickly.

    I think you need to re establish control and reinforce that YOU are in charge for one. You can have trainers come to your house and work with you in a private setting to get these skills up to scratch, then introduce her to a class. I actually spoke to two trainers today about it and both agreed this is the best course of action.

    As horrible as it sounds, if you don't have the real time needed to correct Indi's behavior then I don't think it's a bad idea re-homing her. I don't think that makes you a 'bad' owner or anything (that's how I would feel if I had to give up a dog) but if it's right for you and your family then consider it.

    On thing is for sure though, you can't stop. If you make a commitment to helping her, then you need to follow it through. Getting halfway through then deciding it's too hard will just be set back for everyone and I don't think it will help her at all in the future.

    Let us know what you decide, and good luck

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Thanks Jucealala - the trainers agreed that removing her was the best course of action so that the behaviour did not escalate. I appreciate the advice and will continue with my nightly walks and training after work. I have agreed with my family that whilst Indi is a new to the family she is very much part of it and deserves our best efforts in helping her with her problems.
    I will be booking her in for the blood test and getting the medication. We are also considering sending the min dac to my parent's for a holiday to focus on Indi's training and management.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,637

    Default

    I had a dog who also showed an escalation in similar issues. Beautiful dog with the family and people and dogs she knew but became extremely anxious and reactive aggressive around strange dogs and people.

    She had severe fear aggression. Very time consuming to work with but we made huge improvements. I did join the local dog club and to begin with I worked with her at a distance where she didnt react to other dogs which was quite far away and she was then relaxed enough to take treats. I would get her to look in the direction of the other dogs so she acknowledged them and then look straight at me or 'WATCH ME". I rewarded heavily for this interaction. She also responded well to a clicker but some dogs to better with a voice marker.

    After awhile we managed to get closer and closer and there came a time where she was able to sit in the obedience line up for an off leash stay.

    Really the trick is to always work your dog at the distance where she is non reactive and dont make the sessions too long or they become stressed and less able to learn. Everytime you put her in the situation where she reacts she reinforces that behaviour and she also become too anxious to learn.
    You cannot rush this process. I spent a lot of time going to dog club classes and walking on leash around the streets but keeping at a distance where I could work comfortably with her. We eventually could pass dogs barking behind fences and all sorts of commotions.

    The trainer I got to help me learn some of these techniques was great. She would also run a small class of 6 dogs but most of that time was spent spatially separated to the point where everyone was relaxed. She used her very stable dogs to help in the process. She also taught me to read my dogs body language so I could guage how anxious or stressed she was when I was working with her.

    Time consuming yes, but we slowly rewired her brain. She was also very well trained because I spent a lot of effort obedience training her. Unfortunately you need to make time and lots of it in the early stages.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 09-28-2010 at 09:48 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •