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Thread: So... Can Live Animal Sales Be Done Ethically?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Canberra
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    I agree and disagree with molly33, you can't have the animals so accessable that the kids (and sometimes adults) are able to tap on the glass or poke them if they are not behind glass. But that can be easily fixed really, you could have a back room that you can only enter when you have a staff member with you, or an enclosure that is far enough back from the general public that they can still see but not touch and again can only go there with a staff member.

    I also agree with molly33 about parvo and such, but if you are sourcing your animals through reputable rescue group/s then you would need to make sure that the proper quarantine procedures are followed, therefore making this a hugely reduced risk.

    I would be very interested to see whether you do go ahead with this venture and how it is accepted by both the general public and the more conscious of animals owners that are more aware of the effects of animals in pet shops.

  2. #12

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    Hi all (epic bump!)

    just wanted to let you know that I have opened my store

    we don't sell animals but have partnered with a local dog rescue organisation to promote rescue dogs and cats

    you can find us on facebook here

    PETQuarters | Facebook

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    12,596

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    Excellent on the partnership idea.

    I hate when I see some crippled puppy mill special at the park, and talk to the owner who said they saw it in the petshop - and couldn't resist the big brown eyes ie an impulse buy.

    I think I said somewhere else - I think a pet supplies shop could have video of puppies or dogs that need homes in their shop - so people can see and fall in love but not impulse buy.

  4. #14
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    Nov 2010
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    Brisbane
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    I impulse buy all my dogs, just to chuck that out there

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    I don't believe impulse buying is as big as a problem as some might think it is. In having said that, it is a factor though in the numbers of unwanted dogs and cats we see I feel. I haven't time to read this thread now but hope to later. I will respond in more detail then.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    central coast nsw
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    I am in no way against this type of procedure.. if pet shops were to stop selling live animals yes puppy mills would be out of business.. however what about back yard breeders? they would still breed and would still be able to sell their pets (and alot easier due to pet shops no longer being able to sell livestock) through classifieds on the net and newspapers etc. This will never stop so if procedures like those listed were placed on all pet shops I believe puppies and dogs would have a better chance at a happier more stable life..

  7. #17

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    Cross promotion is a good idea - avoids ethical hurtles.

    If you want people to see the fosters then you can have adoption drive weekends where you ethically display pets for the weekend. Get the interested parties contact details and pass them on to adoption groups.

    Good luck with your business!

  8. #18

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    i think it is a fantastic idea!!!! And I would make a point of shopping for am pet needs in a store like that...
    We have a garden center very close to where I live and they have a petstore in there. Although they sell puppy farm puppies they also sell/adopt older rescue cats and kittens. There are always over 12 wks of age fully vac desexed and microchipped. They have the cats story up on the enclosures window so you can see what its history is. As much as I dont like the puppy side of the store I am very impressed with the quality of them and their living conditions are 2nd to none with massive enclosures always being spotlessly clean and having playmates and lots of toys.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2009
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    I think much of what I would have said has been covered by others.

    I see nothing wrong with pet shops selling pets in an industry that has tight controls. Let's face it, there are more controls on the pet shop industry then there are on registered breeders even.

    Personally, I think we need to move on form this 'bad pet shop' ideal and understand that it can be done without any harm to the animals. It is the breeding side that we need to spend our energies. Who breeds, why they breed, and how they care for their animals.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
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    Hey Mollie, you have a dream...
    I like it.
    I have no issue with stating, live animals in pet shops is not in the interests of the puppy. But that is when you compare it to a perfect life. This puppy is either in the shop, socialising, playing with others, or sleeping, or encaged in a barren lonely pound b&b. Surely, this makes a difference?
    Shouldnt we judge this in context.
    However, of concern to me would be the health implications of housing mutiple animals in the same environment.
    Quote:
    "now assuming parvo, guardia, colitis, corona, demodex mange, hotspots, and ringworm presents itself in store will this be recognized quickly, then acted upon with possibly closing the store for disinfecting."


    But someone, is going to have this contract. It might as well be well meaning persons like yourself. Time for a cost/benefits analysis methinks?

    When i first came to Australia from the uk, i was horrified to see puppys for sale in a SHOP!
    These days, i see them being played with, and well tended by teenage girls. Who are so mouldable and easily trained to improve the welfare of animals in their care. They will WANT to help the animals, by tapping into this natural drive and need in the teen to care, you have a very motivated workforce id say.

    The financial side worries me. But that's because i worry about investments. I dont enjoy the ventures. I have no knowledge to offer on this. Others may.

    Its a thought provoking dilema you have there.

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