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Thread: Bondi Vet - Anti-pitbull Episode Leaving Me Aghast

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussiemyf7 View Post
    My 17 year old cousin had to write a persuasive oral speech on an issue they were passionate about, with some of my help, this is what she came up with.

    The breed specific legislation or BSL is a law that determines which dog breeds are deemed dangerous and their owners must follow a list of rules and regulations. In some cases BSL has deemed some breeds so dangerous that they have not only been restricted, but banned in some countries.
    In Australia, the most commonly known restricted breed is the American Pit Bull Terrier. Owners of the Pit Bull must have a permit to own more than one restricted breed and have clearly visable 'beware of the dog' signs on their gates. The dogs must be leashed and muzzled at all times, no exceptions. Under age people are not allowed to be in charge of a restricted breed, plus many more. Temperament of the dog doesn't matter, if they are classified as a Pit Bull, they are classified as dangerous.
    BSL is wrong; you can't make rules based on a few bad dogs. For every Pit Bull that kills, there are 10.5 million that don't.
    The Pit Bull has a bad reputation because of 3 main things, their history, their owners and the media.

    In the beginning of the 20th century, the American Pit Bull was the most popular family dog. During the middle of the 1900s, the wrong people discovered how loyal and intelligent the Pit Bull is, and were selectively bred to become fighting dogs.
    Its often forgotton popular breeds like the Staffy, Bulldog, Mastiff and Shar Pei were all used as dog fighters and/or bull baiters at some stage in their past, but BSL fails to restrict them...so far. Back in the 1870s, the American Staffordshire became a recognised breed by the American Kennel Club. It was from then on, all registered Pit Bull would be referred to as an Amstaff, while the unregistered would be called a Pit Bull. Funnily enough, the Amstaff isn't restricted although they're the same breed.
    Why do we never hear about the Pit Bulls that are used as police, therapy and conpanion dogs? People still base the Pit Bulls history on the modern day breed.
    Judging a breed based on their history, you could say its like rascism.

    A child will become what they are based on how they're raised. Its the same for dogs. Any breed can be dangerous if abused or unsocialised. World reknown dog behaviour specialist and star of the Foxtel program 'The Dog Whisperer', Cesar Millan often used his Pit Bull 'Daddy' to help rehabilitate dog agressive dogs. Daddy passed away at age 16 in February, and Cesar described the Pit Bull as his mentor in life.
    The Pit Bull is in a cycle, the more you hear about them being 'killers' the more the wrong people what to own them as a status symbol and fail to properly train and socialise it, the dog then attacks and ends up in the news again.
    Dog fighters abuse and torture their dogs to be vicious. In some cases of Pit Bull rescue, dogs have been found with bottle caps found uner the skin of their neck, to ensure they are always on guard when handled around the throat.
    How many times have you met a small snappy dog and thought nothing of it, or even cute? Simply because of their size and history, a badly behaving Pit Bull is seen as dangerous, while a badly behaving Chihuahua is seen as cute.
    The owners that raise a Pit Bull with love and respect are the ones that suffer if the breed is banned.

    Finally, the media play the largest part of brainwashing the world into believing the Pit Bull is born to kill. How many times have you heard 'a Pit Bull type dog' or 'a Pit Bull mix'? What makes a reporter and expert on breed identification?
    How many times do you hear 'Pit Bull mauls baby' and how unlikely is it you will hear 'Pit Bull rescues baby'?
    Why did the media never mention when Dakota the search and rescue Pit Bull found a woman after a flood? When Dakotas owner, Kristin Crawford was asked 'did your dog bite the woman when she found her?', Crawford saud 'thats something no search and rescue dog handler with another breed is ever asked'.
    The American Temperament Testing Association is a society that put a number of breeds through stressful situations and see their reaction, the first sign of stress, aggression or fear is a fail. The Pit Bull had an average passing rate of 86%, higher than popular breeds like the Golden Retriever, Beagle and Maltese.
    In 2005 it was recorded the German Shepherd had the highest amount of attacks, followed by the Blue Heeler, the Rottwieler, the Staffy and the Pit Bull came in at 5th. The Kelpie at 8th, the Labrador at 9th and the Border Collie at 10th. Why did the media never report on these attacks?
    Violence sells. A 'fighting dog' sells. Even to the point of the imaginary gift of the 'lock jaw'. No dog breed, including the Pit Bull can lock its jaw, its physically impossible.

    People get attacked by dogs every day, and for the most part, if no one is killed in the attack, only the Pit Bulls make the headlines. The Pit Bull is an unfairly judged breed, any dog has the potential to be dangerous, and any dog in the wrong hands can be dangerous. BSL hasn't reduced the amount of attacks, its just destroyed dogs for being what they are. The people of Australia need to stop believing every thing we read in the paper and hear on the news, we need to remember not every species still continues their history traits today and that us as humans are the base of raising a happy, healthy, loving pet. A dog is what you make it.
    Great read, well done!! except for the bit I outlined in red, it gives the wrong impression, whilst meaning to be pro pit bull it leaves you thinking the dogs were altered by the dog fighters, this is not so they were always bred to fight, and thus specifically bred NEVER to bite man for man had to be able to referee fights safely, they just were 'nanny' dogs and were usually part of the family in the old days, but still a fighting dog nonetheless, fighting dog does not equal human aggression, just the opposite.

  2. #32
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    Did anyone get any response from Channel 10/Bondi Vet?

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Minibulls mum View Post
    Great read, well done!! except for the bit I outlined in red, it gives the wrong impression, whilst meaning to be pro pit bull it leaves you thinking the dogs were altered by the dog fighters, this is not so they were always bred to fight, and thus specifically bred NEVER to bite man for man had to be able to referee fights safely, they just were 'nanny' dogs and were usually part of the family in the old days, but still a fighting dog nonetheless, fighting dog does not equal human aggression, just the opposite.
    I'll pass it on

    Sharoo, I got a reply from the vet Lisa Chimes works at.
    Unfortunately I didn't save my original message, so I can only share the response.

    Hi Myf,
    Just wanted to respond to your email about our episode involving the pit bull terrier attack.
    Being genuine animal lovers, we assure you we do not seek story lines that will pinpoint a certain breed. Unfortunately little Scruffy was attacked and it was not a situation we could ignore.
    In a similar sense, if someone comes to the Bondi clinic with worries about a dog’s breed, it is their concern not our attitude towards a breed.
    I personally own German Shepherds and often find they are perceived as aggressive and unsafe. So I understand your frustration.
    If you did listen to the entire episode you would have also heard Lisa saying that she certainly didn’t want all pit bulls to be tarnished by this incident and that the majority of pit bulls would be good family pets and that any dog’s temperament is a product of the right breeding and environment.
    I am sure if you have been a long term viewer of our show you will know just how much love and care Chris and Lisa give to their patients and how much they care about the welfare and protection of all animals.
    Best Wishes,

    Anne-Maree
    Education not Legislation

  4. #34

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    Thanks Myf - but in regard to what they say about her having said 'no tarring the whole breed', no, I don't remember that piece from the show, and I watched the entire show. I now want to rewatch to see if she does say any such thing, because I really don't believe she did. I have a good memory for these things and I don't think she said it at all. She may have mentioned it to someone in passing, but in that case it made the cutting room floor and she needs to speak to the show's producers.

  5. #35
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    Being genuine animal lovers, we assure you we do not seek story lines that will pinpoint a certain breed. Unfortunately little Scruffy was attacked and it was not a situation we could ignore.
    Yet they were happy to pin point a Pit bull as the main offender without any real proof? Like the thread on here posted before with the link to "pick the pit bull' Many breeds are easily mistaken as Pit bulls.


    In a similar sense, if someone comes to the Bondi clinic with worries about a dog’s breed, it is their concern not our attitude towards a breed.
    I'd really be interested to see the outcome of this episode if the dog had Pit bull in it. i wonder how the owner would have reacted. Obviously they would have had no intention on keeping it if they were prepared to shell out the money for Dog DNA tests (or whatever it was)

    SpotTheDog, I'm also interested to see if she said it. I also don't remember her saying it, however I was doing other things at the time I was watching it.

  6. #36

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    I cannot recall her saying it either and I also watched the whole episode . Her statement on 'locking jaws' still gets me cranky.
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  7. #37
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    DNA tests for dogs are certainly unreliable, especially wrt to Pit Bull terriers, as these aren't genetically a breed but a type of dog with defined characteristics belonging to a group of similar breeds. Because they are only recently selected from other bull terrier breeds and include other heavier breeds like mastiffs the breed is a potpouri genetically. All a genetic test can tell you is that a dog is not a purebred because its genes all belong to one breed (or maybe two but even that is a stretch).
    Pitbulls definitely have a strong tendancy to "lock" onto their prey: there doesn't need to be some physical mechanism for this term to be appropriate. You might not like the term lockjaw (Lockjaw is a common name for tetanus which certainly does occur in dogs) but the fact remains the combination of their powerful jaws and this aggressive habit make them extremely dangerous if they do attack. Many staffies have similar characteristics and are frequently dog aggressive and are thus popular in dog fighting. Pit bulls are essentially the staffies and crossbreds who have been selected by living through dog fights for hundreds of years.
    Many Pit Bulls have quite nice temperaments, but they do often have behavioral issues and they can be very problematic when this occurs (as can many other breeds bred for fighting or guarding such as Rotties).
    Obviously correct training and socialisation make a big difference to most dogs but the genetic and physical characteristics of a breed should be taken into account when choosing a pet.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by CairnsVet View Post
    Many Pit Bulls have quite nice temperaments, but they do often have behavioral issues and they can be very problematic when this occurs (as can many other breeds bred for fighting or guarding such as Rotties).
    Obviously correct training and socialisation make a big difference to most dogs but the genetic and physical characteristics of a breed should be taken into account when choosing a pet.
    Hi and welcome to the forum. It will be great to have a vet's perspective on things.

    I have grown up with Rottweiler's and have NEVER seen any aggression in any of them. They however, have been very well socialised pet's and not used for guarding or any other reason. That's not to say that there are not aggressive and dangerous Rotts out there.

    My Stafford has a beautiful temperament. Friendly and again well socialised.


    We choose these breeds because of their personalities and I can't imagine ever not owning a Rottweiler or Stafford.

    I think my point is..... why focus on a particular breed? All dogs have the potential to cause damage. All dogs can be aggressive.
    Yes the above breeds are very powerful but how many times have you seen a friendly Stafford walking around with an oversized studded collar with some over the top 'tough' name? With the owner spruking on about how tough his dog is? Are they not partly to blame for the breed's reputation? Is the dog judged before it's even given a chance?
    Last edited by JJames; 02-21-2011 at 03:13 PM.

  9. #39

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    I wanted to share this photo of my Rottweiler, she's sitting next to me in this photo, while accepting kisses from a small female who is sitting on my lap. This is the 4th time my Rottie has seen this dog.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by CairnsVet View Post
    DNA tests for dogs are certainly unreliable, especially wrt to Pit Bull terriers, as these aren't genetically a breed but a type of dog with defined characteristics belonging to a group of similar breeds. Because they are only recently selected from other bull terrier breeds and include other heavier breeds like mastiffs the breed is a potpouri genetically. All a genetic test can tell you is that a dog is not a purebred because its genes all belong to one breed (or maybe two but even that is a stretch).
    Pitbulls definitely have a strong tendancy to "lock" onto their prey: there doesn't need to be some physical mechanism for this term to be appropriate. You might not like the term lockjaw (Lockjaw is a common name for tetanus which certainly does occur in dogs) but the fact remains the combination of their powerful jaws and this aggressive habit make them extremely dangerous if they do attack. Many staffies have similar characteristics and are frequently dog aggressive and are thus popular in dog fighting. Pit bulls are essentially the staffies and crossbreds who have been selected by living through dog fights for hundreds of years.
    Many Pit Bulls have quite nice temperaments, but they do often have behavioral issues and they can be very problematic when this occurs (as can many other breeds bred for fighting or guarding such as Rotties).
    Obviously correct training and socialisation make a big difference to most dogs but the genetic and physical characteristics of a breed should be taken into account when choosing a pet.
    I have too strogly disagree about a lot of staffies having dog aggresion issue & that they are that simalar in temperment to true pitt bulls. I am talking only about English Staffies not Am Staffs here where not known to be so dog aggressive untill recently. I know they come from the origanal fighting dogs just as the pitties do but the difference is the direction the breeders toke with each breed over the last 50 years. Pitt Bull unfortunally countined to fall into the hands of bad dog men & the staffs where being breed for show/pet soley in this same time period so the result was 2 totally different temperemented dogs.
    I am not against Pitt Bulls but they are more a working breed where as Staffs as the family pet type more not saying pits don't make great pets as they can just that the marjority of the breed has been breed with different dog sports in mind more than as a pet or show dog.
    I do realize of late there has been more & more aggressive staffs coming onto the scences but I think that has more to do with their popularity spike & being therefore breed for money not health or type by non health testing over crowed breeding factories & in suburban backyards. Neither are getting the up bringing they need to be socialable dogs.
    Just my opinion & more than happy to hear others.
    Dogs make everyday life enjoyable...........

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