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Thread: Shelter Lies

  1. #21

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    Maybe just have a quiet word with the foster co-ordinator of the shelter. I think they would be most interested to know their carer needs to be brought up to speed on preventatives. Perhaps even provided with some.

    re: heartworm. There is early stage, which can be treated long term with one of the ivermectin drops (can't for the life of me remember which one now).
    Then there is later stage, the treatment is harsher and must be administered asap by the vet in a series. Apparently only the daily heartworm tablets are dangerous to dogs already positive to the parasite but I would suggest a test first just to be safe.

    Worms: a good allwormer now, and again in two weeks. Then once every three months if it's not covered in your flea preventative.

    Sorry to bust in. I don't post here a lot.

  2. #22
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    Sorry to drag this up again,,, But Pixel was groomed yesterday and the groomer found ear mites. Not happy with the amount of parasites on this dog.

    I don't think she would have gotten them after we got her either, because our cats never get ear mites, so we're not in an ear mite area, so to speak...

    I really should have a word with the shelter eh...

  3. #23

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    I use Capstar tablets for foster dogs, it kills all adult fleas that are present on the dog, I find it great... usually takes just the one tablet, which I give as soon as I pick the dog up... that way I'm not bringing adult fleas into my house... My last foster had more flea's than I've ever seen on a dog... one treatement and one bath and never seen another flea...

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie_82 View Post
    Sorry to drag this up again,,, But Pixel was groomed yesterday and the groomer found ear mites. Not happy with the amount of parasites on this dog.

    I don't think she would have gotten them after we got her either, because our cats never get ear mites, so we're not in an ear mite area, so to speak...

    I really should have a word with the shelter eh...
    How does the groomer know they are ear mites and not just dirt? I thought they had to be seen under a microscope to confirm that they are mites? Wouldn't that have been picked up at your vet visit?

    I think you should just move on.
    Last edited by Cat; 08-28-2010 at 08:53 PM.

  5. #25
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    We haven't been to the vet, so no.

    She knew it wasn't just dirt because it was only one ear, which she cleaned out when she groomed her. The next day we went back because I wasn't entirely happy with the groom, and then she had another look in her ears and the same ear had filled up with black stuff again. I saw it, and it was a LOT of buildup for 24 hours.

    She has also been shaking her head a lot, which is another symptom.

  6. #26

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    They shake when they are dirty as well. Or have an ear infection, etc

    When you get a new pet you need to take them to the vet to make sure all is ok and the animal is healthy So if they aren't you can do something about it then.

    Sorry, but you seem to keep wanting to find issues to create problems for the shelter or get your money back. You haven't even taken your dog to the vet to confirm it is ear mites. Did you ever phone the shelter to find out what they had given your dog?

    I still think you should just treat your dog, move on and do more research before you get another pet.

  7. #27

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    A bacterial or fugal infection is more likely to create a fast buildup of ear gunk. These sort of infections can be only one ear and can come on fast or be longer standing.

    I hope you get your girl sorted soon.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie_82 View Post
    Sorry to drag this up again,,, But Pixel was groomed yesterday and the groomer found ear mites. Not happy with the amount of parasites on this dog.

    I don't think she would have gotten them after we got her either, because our cats never get ear mites, so we're not in an ear mite area, so to speak...

    I really should have a word with the shelter eh...
    Yeah, have a word. It doesn't have to be an aggro thing, they just may not know their carer has missed a few things. The carer may need to be supplied with treatments and a schedule.

    Ears: can flare up very quickly. And if your cats are being treated with any of the spot-on type products they won't have earmites anyway. You could be seeing ear mites or a bacterial/fungal infection which will need prescription drops. They both tend to have a different look and smell but a swab at the vets will tell you for sure. Mites are not visible with the naked eye so the groomer may be mistaken.

    & Some dogs can have more ear problems than others regardless. Specially ones that play in water , have floppy ears, hairy ear canals or food allergies.

    Hope that helps. All rescues come with a bit of baggage, just be patient.

  9. #29
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    I don't even care about getting my money back anymore, I am just frustrated because I was told she had been treated for parasites when clearly she hasn't been. I was also told she is in "good health", but I don't know if she was checked by a vet at all now.

    She sometimes rubs at her face with her paws too, so I am planning to take her to the vet for a checkup to make sure everything is ok. Can't afford it until next week tho, because of all this parasite treatment stuff I have been paying for.

  10. #30

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    Hey Julie - you sound like you've had a similar experience to me!

    At the end of July, I took a bull arab puppy home from a shelter. I paid $395 for the pup, desexed and wormed with one vaccination. There was a bottle of salve with the dog - I asked the shelter about it, they told me it was for dermatitis on his chin.

    I too have six mostly indoor cats, and I said straight up to the shelter, is this ringworm? If the dog has ringworm, I need to know, because I have six, healthy, indoor cats. Nope, they said, it's dermatitis. The bottle of salve was a bit of a panacea for skin conditions and fungal infections according to its label.

    The pup was also severely underweight - the shelter had only had him a few days, maybe four at the most, when I adopted him, so his weight wasn't their fault. However, at the shelter, he was in a pen with another pup, he was filthy, there was poo on the floor and poo on his bed, which he and the other pup were lying in quite happily.

    When I took him home, first things first I put him in my bath because he was so dirty. As soon as I wet him down, his fur came alive - he was absolutely crawling with fleas. I washed him with flea shampoo and afterwards gave him a spot-on. (I've been told I shouldn't have spotted him so quickly after washing, as the wash can strip the protective oils from the dog's skin and the spot-on could have burned him - it didn't, but you live and learn).

    Once he was clean it also became very evident that he didn't have dermatitis, it was ringworm. I took him home on a Friday, and on Saturday morning I just sucked it up and took him to my vet (out of hours consult, deep joy).

    The vet looked him over and said he was a shambles, but he still had a gorgeous nature. While we were there, she cleaned out his ears - good god, the sticky black tar that came out of both ears was unbelieveable. She advised me to worm him because she didn't trust that he'd been wormed, so he had half a milbemax tablet, the other half to follow a month on.

    It has to be said, my vet charged me $9.50 for the consult - the price of the milbemax tablet. That price isn't because I'm a dream customer - it's testament to the sorry state the pup was in.

    That was about five weeks ago now. On 1st August, Gus weighed in at 6.9kgs. I took him to the vet last Friday 3rd September and he weighed 12.1kgs, so he's putting on just over 1kg per week. He's had his second vaccinations, and his stitches whipped out. He has no remaining active ringworm patches. There's been no recurrance of the sticky black tar in his ears. His flea bites have healed up and there's been no recurrance of fleas.

    The evening I took him home, just after washing him, I sent the shelter an email saying 'this dog has fleas and ringworm, and while I understand the world of animal rescue is imperfect, a heads-up would have been good, especially considering I told you guys I have other animals'. No response.

    On Saturday, before going to my own vet, I rang the shelter because I wanted to discuss the situation with them - my biggest worry was quarantining this young pup for weeks because of ringworm. They were too busy to talk at the time, told me they'd call me back, I gave them both my numbers, and they never called me.

    The upshot: in my case, I really feel the shelter behaved unethically. I think the pup should have gone into foster care until his weight and health issues were right, and then gone up for rehoming. It's worth noting, on his shelter paperwork, Gus is a 'staffordshire X'. I said to the shelter, I don't think that dog's a staffie cross. I think he's a Bull Arab (later confirmed, inasmuch as you can ever 'confirm' bull arab as a breed, by the vet.)

    Yes, the shelter said to me, we know, but when we don't know the dog's origin 100%, we just put 'staffie cross' on his paperwork because people get intimidated by the word 'bull' and won't adopt the dogs.

    What am I going to do about it?

    Not much.

    Anyone I speak to personally, I'll relate my experience and I'll name the shelter. The shelter I took Gus from don't do home checks - they told me over the phone it was because they "don't like to judge". Based on my personal experience, I rather think now that it's because home checks are too much work and they can't be arsed.

    Still, I have a pretty excellent pup here - he's biddable, friendly, and healthy now, and the most important thing is he's never going back into a pound or shelter environment again. My focus now is continuing to socialise him with these six cats, and getting him into training class (starting October).

    Dogs are expensive, and sometimes shelters are arseholes. Me, I'm taking this as a learning experience and I won't make the same mistakes - taking anything for granted - again. Trouble is, when you fall in love with one pathetic heap of bones at a shelter, do you leave it there because of all the considerations listed above, or step up? I often wonder what ever happened to Gus's littermate who we left in the same pen...

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