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Thread: At a Loss for Which Dog

  1. #21
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    sorry also meant to add, as an owner of a working dog in a metro area and working full time, i thing it is possible to have a working dog if you have done your research and they are what you really want. but. be prepared to give up most your free time for them at obedience/beach/new places/socialising. once you have bonded with them you start to feel guilty about leaving them when you could do an activity that involves your dog as well.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimbastaff View Post
    some breeds you could try - you will need to do more research on - Alaskan Malamute, Akita, Husky, Chow, Marema - these are breeds which I know don't mind spending time alone....
    But this breeds need a LOT of excercise and space. Maremano is flock guarding breed which needs a lot of free space. Malamute and husky need a lot of running (and I mean several kilometres per day, and sometimes even that isn't enough), don't know about Akita and Chow though
    Respect and you shall be respected. Animal is always right.

  3. #23

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    Akita and Chow - NOT for new dog owners. Very challenging breeds...

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fedra View Post
    As a rottie owner I can say it is not true. Of course, it all depends how you raise the dog. I have found mine 5 years ago on a rubish dump with 9 puppies, adopted pups and nobody wanted her. She was around 2-3 years old. I lived in an apartment back then. I took her home with me and there was only one incident the very first day when I went out and she had a panick attack that I was going to leave her. She's never had any mistakes (pee or poo or damaging). We took her out before work to do her business, then straight after we came home from work plus one long walk in the evening. I also know a lot of people who own rotties and live in apartments, houses with small yards etc. Now we have a yard but it's not all that big and I have two dogs and third that I foster.

    I have to agree that rotties aren't for inexperienced people as they can be very pushy and strong willed, but alltogether they are wonderfull, very loyal and very attached to their families. I would suggest perhaps you get a grown up spayed female from the shelter, and before hand you check for her history and behaviour. Yes they do need regular excercise but they are nowhere near as needy as belgian malinois would be for example (also working breed). They even tend to be lazy and quite slow.
    I'm a Rottie owner too and I wouldn't be encouraging people in this situation to get one. I think they were after a pup and Rotties do need a lot of exercise and mental stimulation until they start to slow down at around 2-3 years old. It also makes a difference having more than one dog because they have each other for company while you're at work.

    I agree that they are a wonderful breed, in fact when raised correctly they can be one of the most affectionate, loyal, well behaved dogs you could have. My Rottie is extremely well behaved and always has been because her needs are met.

    The OP MAY be moving to a place with a larger yard, they are renting so who knows where they will be in 12 months or 10 years. Finding a rental which allows dogs can be hard enough, but especially with a large breed.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mollinator View Post
    The OP MAY be moving to a place with a larger yard, they are renting so who knows where they will be in 12 months or 10 years. Finding a rental which allows dogs can be hard enough, but especially with a large breed.
    renting means nothing - who knows where any of us will be in 12 months to 5 years time? we could lose a job, and not be able to keep our house payments and have to move... you cant judge everything by what MAY or may not happen..

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  6. #26
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    Oct 2009
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    I always advocate to have a plan in place if things happen for the worst. See if friends or family will take a pet if circumstances change. That way you do have your pet, you do try hard but sometimes life DOES throw an unforeseen curve ball.

    Make sure you factor in what type of dog you get with it's needs that can still be met if you have kids in the future too.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  7. #27

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    Thanks for all the advice everyone. Really giving us some food for thought.

    We have taken a really good look into a lot of the breeds that everyone has suggested. First pre-requisite was the look of the animal, at the end of the day if you don’t find your pet visually stimulating well you get my drift.

    So that culled a lot out and after taking size, intellect, coat length (not keen on a dog with a long coat) and all other factors in our life.... were at the beagle and rottie.

    Were leaning more towards the beagle now because it can be more of an indoor dog. When we get home we want to be able to devote as much time as possible and it just seems better to do it from an in-house perspective. Rather than having a 50kg rottie running around the place.

    With morning and afternoon walks, stimulation by rotating toys daily and weekend adventures were confident we can give the dog a very happy life together.

    We are allowed pets up to 10-15kg at our current place so the beagle really is looking at being a great option for us taking into consideration all of the above.

    One other thing i might ask advice on from current / previous owners of a beagle is this unloyalty when on a scent. Does it occur often or can it be lead to problems when out and about (or does it more so happen for poorly trained animals). Last thing anyone wants im sure is to be forever running after your dog when at the park as he’s picked up a scent.

  8. #28
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    May 2009
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    Victoria
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    Buying an animal based on looks is a one way ticket to the shelter once the novely wears off.
    The biggest breed I can think off the is a 'couch potatoe' is the Greyhound.
    Otherwise there the Dacshund(sp?), Maltese, Pug, Cavvie etc.
    Education not Legislation

  9. #29

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    Being a scent hound, and a strong one, they don't have a very good recall.
    Having said that I guess it depends on how much training you put in, and it would have to be a lot from day dot.
    Personally I wouldn't let one off lead unless it was a fenced off area.
    I would speak to a lot of registered breeders for advice. You see a lot of beagles in shelters.

  10. #30
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    Oct 2009
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    We all base our preferences on looks, what appeals or doesn't to us Myf. I wouldn't have greyhounds, don't like their looks. The smart ones like Ocean also do their research to see if the needs match up with them and their environment.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

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