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Thread: The Temperament of a Pigging Dog?

  1. #11
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    We have owned many pigdogs over the years, not one was aggressive to anything other than pigs,they loved our cats and chooks and kids, would not even chase our domestic pigs! most piggers teach them not to chase anything else so no other animal is seen as prey other than a pig, there are exceptions of course but they are no more likely to be man aggressive or dog aggressive than any other individual dog.

    Care should be taken with any dog you bring into your home, there is however no need to distrust this dog just because it has been a working pigdog.


    Aussie Floyd, Dogs are used where I live because you cannot shoot what you cannot see, pigs tend to keep to scrubby areas and overgrown river flats and creeks, nothing but dogs can get them out of those places, the pigs do many millions of dollars worth of damage to crops in some areas, (still cannot use guns in many of those because of proximity of houses), and they kill many new born lambs, pigs have been observed following a lambing ewe and will tear her lamb from her, quite literally. I have heard of losses of up to 30 % of lambs where pigs are in large numbers, it is not just a sport but a necessity to keep their numbers down.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Minibulls mum View Post
    We have owned many pigdogs over the years, not one was aggressive to anything other than pigs,they loved our cats and chooks and kids, would not even chase our domestic pigs! most piggers teach them not to chase anything else so no other animal is seen as prey other than a pig, there are exceptions of course but they are no more likely to be man aggressive or dog aggressive than any other individual dog.

    Care should be taken with any dog you bring into your home, there is however no need to distrust this dog just because it has been a working pigdog.


    Aussie Floyd, Dogs are used where I live because you cannot shoot what you cannot see, pigs tend to keep to scrubby areas and overgrown river flats and creeks, nothing but dogs can get them out of those places, the pigs do many millions of dollars worth of damage to crops in some areas, (still cannot use guns in many of those because of proximity of houses), and they kill many new born lambs, pigs have been observed following a lambing ewe and will tear her lamb from her, quite literally. I have heard of losses of up to 30 % of lambs where pigs are in large numbers, it is not just a sport but a necessity to keep their numbers down.
    \


    imo the whole thing about using dogs to hunt / slaughter is just an excuse for mans greed & entertainment & it's all bla bla bla

    I'm so glad that i no longer live in a country town full of idiots to who use dogs as killing machines....
    Last edited by Aussie Floyd; 06-12-2010 at 01:38 PM.

  3. #13
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    So you would rather see livestock ripped to pieces instead, AF?

    Keeping feral animals down, whether pigs, roos etc is a necessity.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Di_dee1 View Post
    So you would rather see livestock ripped to pieces instead, AF?

    Keeping feral animals down, whether pigs, roos etc is a necessity.
    No Di.. i don't like to see any animal ripped to shreds...I understand & respect the need to cull feral animals.. but don't believe in using dogs to kill... we arn't the dark ages anymore & there is such a thing as a quick instant kill by using a gun...

    IMO dogs should be owned for only 1 purpose....pets only

    FFS i don't even believe or support GH,other dog or horse racing either.

  5. #15
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    I also don't like the ripping to shreds of any animal, I do however see the need for dogs to flush the pigs from undergrowth. The few that I know that go after pigs with dogs then pride themselves on a quick clean kill by shooting. I understand that is not always the case though.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #16
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    Bee pooch, it is a bit of a 'how long is a pice of string' question. I have seen hunting dogs that are well trained and placid and wonderful pets. In fact many hunting dogs are owned by fastitious and expert hunters and are very valuable, and treated accordingly. Yes I will concede that others are not so well treated.

    Whether or not you agree with the whole hunting ethic, or use of dogs to do it, is an argument I think I will stay out of. The idea of a dog to hunt pigs is twofold.

    First, the energy and keen sense of smell is used to find pigs that tend to be very good at hiding in undergrowth during the day. Pigs are intelligent, cunning, and very fast. They can also be very dangerous if you stumble across one. If you are hunting pigs on foot, a dog is handy to tell you where they are.

    A popular sport in pig hunting has grown since the introduction of Australias very strict gun restrictions. Many pig dogs are now used to find the pigs and keep them distracted while the hunter approaches the pig from behind and dispatches it with a knife. These are the ones that wear the heavy collars etc to help protect them from the pig tusks.

    I do not know of any dogs that could be used to attack a pig to death. The pig would win. This is not fox hunting.

    Pig dogs are used to find and distract the quarry. Hope I have just put in the facts. Your dog could be a beaut pet, or not. it is more dependent in my on its past history than its occupation.
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  7. #17
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    Personally OP, the fact that your new dog has been used for approx. five years as a pig dog really wouldn't come into it with me - what would come into it is the fact that the dog is unknown, has (from the comments you've given) been raised in an environment that possibly wasn't constructive to it's overall well-being mentally or physically.

    Like any dog you bring into your premises at that age, be VERY alert, be extra cautious, take everything one slow step at a time. Get to know the dog one-on-one and see what you think.

    Known heaps of pigging dogs. Some I'll bypass cause I sense they'd prolly hunt me, others I'll always stop at for a pat and a chat as they are just gorgeous with beaut temperaments.

    All the best, I hope the dog turns out great for you and can now lead a wonderful loving life.
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  8. #18
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    Um, probably going a little OT here, so apologies...

    But gotta ask - does anyone know the stats of how many dogs trained and used for hunting pigs have been in trouble with the authorities for attacking other dogs and humans within their towns/cities?

    I've personally never come across it, but I sure have come across a lot of 'pets' who have unfortunately savaged other dogs, cats and humans.

    Would be intersting to know.
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  9. #19
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    AF,
    I do understand to a great extent why a person who has not been reared to cope with outback life would abhor the rougher aspects of it, however you do put forward a view of pigdogs which is totally in error, they are not killing machines any more than any dog is, today most peggers do not just kill a pig and leave it, they sell into wild game companies who export the meat, no carcase which is even bruised is acceptable, pigs are not pulled to bits or killed by dogs in by far the majority of cases, a few outlaw types may well do the wrong thing here and there, but this is certainly not the norm these days, dogs belonging to serious piggers are trained to do a hard job and do it well, killing machines do not come into it at all.
    Please do not put such a label on a great line of dogs like this.
    You have also missed the point that you cannot shoot what you cannot see, to fire bullets after a pig retreating into scrub or swamp and risk wounding without a direct kill is to possibly leave an animal to die in agony which may take days or longer if it makes it to cover before dropping, to use dogs is a rough but fast way to get the pig either held by lugging or driven to where it can safely be shot.
    Far kinder in the long run.

    We have also reared pet wild piglets, the most charming, funny and intelligent things going, so I do not like to see pigs hurt for any longer that is strictly needed to cull them either, but always I remember my stepfather telling of the boar he saw dragging a half born lamb from it's mothers uterus, like it or lump it pigdogs are a necessity

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    Um, probably going a little OT here, so apologies...

    But gotta ask - does anyone know the stats of how many dogs trained and used for hunting pigs have been in trouble with the authorities for attacking other dogs and humans within their towns/cities?

    I've personally never come across it, but I sure have come across a lot of 'pets' who have unfortunately savaged other dogs, cats and humans.

    Would be intersting to know.
    Very few DA and I live in a town full of them, they are normally very safe around pets and family and few will even guard home or property.

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