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Thread: Purebred Dogs with Serious Health Defects

  1. #1

    Default Purebred Dogs with Serious Health Defects

    This is Molly's story.....

    Molly was bred by a reputable, registered breeder who is a member of the local Rottweiler club and the ANKC.

    I collected her from the breeder at 7 weeks and 1 day (found out later that this is against the Code of Ethics).

    At 12 weeks Molly was diagnosed with moderate SAS (sub-aortic stenosis), a serious heart condition which is known in the USA as a genetic condition in Rottweilers. This was diagnosed by having an ultrasound on her heart.

    To cut a long story short, I rang the breeder to explain this situation and she tried to fob me off. After about an hour on the phone she finally agreed to a second opinion from her vet. We went to her vet and he agreed immediately that the diagnosis was correct and she was wrong in her opinion. We left the vet and I didn't hear from her.

    Four months later I had a second ultrasound done and the condition had progressed to severe (the worst it can be). I rang the breeder again and sent emails informing her of the outcome and eventually got a response from her. She offered me $800 plus a free puppy when Molly dies or $1000 straight up. I paid her $1500 for Molly plus $800 on ultrasounds. The logical decision at the time was to take the deal of $800 plus free puppy.

    Molly is now 13 months old and I can feel the heart murmur by touching her chest. She is the most wonderful dog and I can't imagine being without her at such a young age. Her breeder is planning another breed by the same parents even though this condition is known as genetic. I tried raising this issue with a purebred forum which resulted in a couple of very good, ethical breeders being very concerned about this and a few others making out like I was to blame or a lier.

    To all puppy buyers, all I can say is don't rely on a breeder being registered or a member of a club as being ethical.
    Last edited by Mollinator; 06-07-2010 at 09:38 PM.

  2. #2

    Default

    I'm so sorry to hear about your puppy.
    Unfortunately unless you can prove the breeder knew about the heart condition when she either sold you the puppy, or bred her dogs then there's nothing you can do.
    If you can prove that the breeder knew about the condition then you can basically sue her butt off.

    You are actually quite lucky to be offered a replacement puppy plus a refund, although I would be more inclined to take the $1000 and never deal with that breeder again.

    And yes, being a member of a club doesn't automatically mean they are good breeders. That's why it is important to learn what tests need to be performed on a certain breed and make sure your chosen breeder does them.

  3. #3

    Default

    Oh Mollinator I'm so sorry. I did see your story elsewhere and was saddened by it and disppointed by some responses. Unfortunately some breeders do turn a blind eye to genetic issues. I don't know why - human stubborness? Maybe they see it as some sort of failure on their part? They shouldn't. Life deals things out, ignoring these things doesn't make them go away.

    Any breeders should all be working to eliminate these things from any domestic animal that we keep - it should be the most important part of breeding. But humans being humans... the reality doesn't always work that way.

    I'm so sorry for what you are going through with your beautiful girl. Even though it may seem small consolation, it is fantastic that she has you by her side while she is unwell, that she has someone who cares so much. That is a huge thing, and I'm sure you'll treasure every minute with her - good and bad.



    On a more officious note, have you considered speaking to your State governing body about it? As far as I know this is a condition that is common in other parts of the world in this breed, and it's appearance here could be worth them following up on. All conditions that breeders now are required to test for started out with one case coming to someone's attention. I wouldn't want to send you off on another disppointing path but you never know.

    Whatever you think, welcome to this little forum, we're always more than willing to share laughs and tears.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
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    Default

    You're taking a puppy from the same litter?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    planet Earth
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mollinator View Post

    To all puppy buyers, all I can say is don't rely on a breeder being registered or a member of a club as being ethical.
    Which makes me think what (or who) is a reputable breeder?

    Is it someone registered by AKC or is it more to that? It is actually up to a person who buys a dog. Firstly, if a person likes a certain breed, and wants to buy a puppy, it is necesary to investigate all about that breed, from its character to health issues. When you're familiar with possible genetic problems that breed might carry you should then look for a breeder that really cares about health apart from just breeding for looks or character.

    A breeder who really cares makes sure and takes evidence of ancestors' health ie. does not breed if certain health tests have not been done and has record track to prove that they have been done (hip/elbow x-rays, deafness test for certain breeds, eye tests for certain breeds etc).

    Has your breeder provided you with the results of health tests for both the parents and the test results of grandparents (I don't know how it is in Australia, but hip results are supposed to be written in your dog's pedigree in order to get breeding permit, same goes with some other tests depending on a breed). Not a lot of people are aware of it and do not ask for it, and they should. Of course, sometimes health issues can occur even though all precautions have been taken and that's just a matter of bad luck then, unfortunately, and such dogs should not be bread further.
    Respect and you shall be respected. Animal is always right.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by silvershadowwolf24 View Post
    You're taking a puppy from the same litter?
    No I'm not, it was a decision I had to make at the time.

  7. #7

    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by Crested_Love View Post
    I'm so sorry to hear about your puppy.
    Unfortunately unless you can prove the breeder knew about the heart condition when she either sold you the puppy, or bred her dogs then there's nothing you can do.
    If you can prove that the breeder knew about the condition then you can basically sue her butt off.

    You are actually quite lucky to be offered a replacement puppy plus a refund, although I would be more inclined to take the $1000 and never deal with that breeder again.

    And yes, being a member of a club doesn't automatically mean they are good breeders. That's why it is important to learn what tests need to be performed on a certain breed and make sure your chosen breeder does them.
    I don't think she knew, she seemed surprised when I told her about Molly, but she is breeding the parents again

  8. #8

    Angry

    Quote Originally Posted by Nattylou View Post
    Oh Mollinator I'm so sorry. I did see your story elsewhere and was saddened by it and disppointed by some responses. Unfortunately some breeders do turn a blind eye to genetic issues. I don't know why - human stubborness? Maybe they see it as some sort of failure on their part? They shouldn't. Life deals things out, ignoring these things doesn't make them go away.

    Any breeders should all be working to eliminate these things from any domestic animal that we keep - it should be the most important part of breeding. But humans being humans... the reality doesn't always work that way.

    I'm so sorry for what you are going through with your beautiful girl. Even though it may seem small consolation, it is fantastic that she has you by her side while she is unwell, that she has someone who cares so much. That is a huge thing, and I'm sure you'll treasure every minute with her - good and bad.



    On a more officious note, have you considered speaking to your State governing body about it? As far as I know this is a condition that is common in other parts of the world in this breed, and it's appearance here could be worth them following up on. All conditions that breeders now are required to test for started out with one case coming to someone's attention. I wouldn't want to send you off on another disppointing path but you never know.

    Whatever you think, welcome to this little forum, we're always more than willing to share laughs and tears.
    Thanks Nattylou By state governing body do you mean the state dog club? If so, there's no point, the breeder is an important member of the club I've also been informed that going to other dog regulatory bodies would be a waste of time because they won't do anything.

    There are some Rottweiler breeders who are disgusted and concerned about my breeder's response but that won't stop the bloodline being bred throughout the country. I fear for the future of this beautiful breed.

  9. #9

    Default

    If this breeder is now aware of this defect,and plans to breed the same 2 dogs again,i would be reporting that breeder and the situation to the kennel club of your state and or country,but thats me. It sounds like they dont care for the dogs at all,just the $$ that the pups will bring in.

    Im glad i found this forum. I sent a few emails out to breeders myself in regards to adopting a purebred puppy and while i finally got a reply from a breeder only about an hour away from me,i am even still going to go with a breeder from NSW as i have heard nothing but good reports from this breeder in this forum.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fedra View Post
    Which makes me think what (or who) is a reputable breeder?

    Is it someone registered by AKC or is it more to that? It is actually up to a person who buys a dog. Firstly, if a person likes a certain breed, and wants to buy a puppy, it is necesary to investigate all about that breed, from its character to health issues. When you're familiar with possible genetic problems that breed might carry you should then look for a breeder that really cares about health apart from just breeding for looks or character.

    A breeder who really cares makes sure and takes evidence of ancestors' health ie. does not breed if certain health tests have not been done and has record track to prove that they have been done (hip/elbow x-rays, deafness test for certain breeds, eye tests for certain breeds etc).

    Has your breeder provided you with the results of health tests for both the parents and the test results of grandparents (I don't know how it is in Australia, but hip results are supposed to be written in your dog's pedigree in order to get breeding permit, same goes with some other tests depending on a breed). Not a lot of people are aware of it and do not ask for it, and they should. Of course, sometimes health issues can occur even though all precautions have been taken and that's just a matter of bad luck then, unfortunately, and such dogs should not be bread further.
    Yes, the breeder is registered by ANKC. SAS is not recognised as a genetic health issue in Australia so there is no testing. It's also not listed ANYWHERE as being a genetic problem on Australian websites. I would assume that in another 10 years or so it will be a big problem in Australia because of this type of breeder.

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