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Thread: Big V Small They All Have the Same Right!!!!

  1. #21

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    If I had a chihuahua I would be extra carefull in supervising encounters, just seem too delicate and small, the legs are thinner than a chicken drumstick, ribs like rice noodles, very easy to break.
    If you find yourself going through hell; Don't stay. Just keep on going.
    Beau.

  2. #22
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    We usually have the issue when we go to the vet. Ever since Troopa was around 4 months old the people with SWF always seem to hold their dogs closer when we walk in and give re-assuring words and pats if Troopa moves so much as an inch. Some people seem very much under the impression that big equals dangerous.

  3. #23
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    Hmmm... maybe it could be 'GSD = dangerous'. I certainly know people who are scared of GSDs purely because of them being police dogs and such. Just a thought?

  4. #24
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    Adding another small breed owner opinion, here... I have two Min Pins (about the same size as a Chihuahua but leggier) and they are built delicately. We seldom go to dog parks anymore just because of the amount of times they have been chased or attacked by larger dogs.

    My older female was chased by two Sharpeis and two Newfoundlands earlier this year around a huge offleash oval. One of her nails split and she was bleeding all over the place when I finally caught up to her. This female is not especially interested in dogs; she had a sniff of the dogs initially and the moment she turned her back, she was being chased. The moron owners of the Sharpeis/Newfies was telling me, as my dog ran terrified across this huge stinking oval, that the dogs were "just playing." The Sharpeis' ears were PRICKED and each time they caught up to her, they snapped at her heels. It was hunting behaviour, nothing more to it.

    On the other side of the coin, during this same incident, my staffy x male pursued one of the Sharpeis and brought it down by the hindleg (protecting the female, because he is 100% non dog-aggressive). He is always social with other dogs but overly boisterous dogs (the most common example I've come across being Labradoodles or any poodle/spaniel mix and Labradors) tend to irritate him and so he will snap when he is repeatedly chased by these dogs with zero social etiquette. I find excitable dogs that harass quieter or older dogs as bothersome as outright aggressive dogs.

    My dogs coexist peacefully despite the size/breed difference and it's a shame that I now have to avoid dog parks because people cannot control their dogs properly.

  5. #25

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    Im constantly faced with the problem! I have a M'loot Alaskan Malamute whos 32 inches to the top of his shoulder. I constantly have owners of small dogs tellng me to control my dog etc when hes on a longer lead. Hes as soft as butter never has any problems with other dogs (even if there growling in his face!). I find its usually the little dogs that are the problem growling etc. But the owners of little dogs tend to blame everyone else for their problem instead of dealing with their own dogs (sorry I know generalised, not all are like that!). I find it really annoying and worry that if I keep having to make my dog stay away from other dogs he might get aggressive. He always wants to go and say hello and it feels like punishment having to tell him no!
    Last edited by Dipsey; 05-16-2010 at 11:16 PM.

  6. #26
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    LOL I have the oppisite effect with my SWF (though he isnt white)... People walking there german sheps will cross the road when they see me and banj coming haha.

  7. #27
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    Having been the owner of both I see both sides.

    If the little dog didn't run. Then there is normally no issue. But having said that, to a little dog, having a big dog looming over it is very scary, bit like the NZ All Backs front row coming at you.

    In a situation where a dog feels threatened they react in two way, fight or flight.

    I'm not a lover of dog parks, they can make or break a dog IMO, so the owner needs to be watching their dog and understand what they are seeing to know when to remove their dog or even if they should enter the dog park in the first place.

    I generally find the best little dogs are ones that are raised around big dogs and visa-versa.

    The best way to introduce a big and a small dog to each other is thru a mesh fence with the little dogs rear pointing towards the large dog so that the big dog can sniff it and gather all the information, that way it's less likely to chase it to take in the same info.

    I think in a lot of instances dogs go home from the dog park not exhausted from play but due to stress and anxiety of having to navigate around the other dogs.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beau View Post
    If I had a chihuahua I would be extra carefull in supervising encounters, just seem too delicate and small, the legs are thinner than a chicken drumstick, ribs like rice noodles, very easy to break.
    I too would be extra careful owning a small breed of dog. Having kids I won't own anything too small due to the worry that one of the kids might accidentaly fall and hurt them. It just bugs me that by owning a Bull Terrier and a giant bitza who are both well socialised and well behaved, I am treated like I am walking a bloody lion and a tiger. I get a bit over defending the breeds and the dogs because other people are too ignorant to see that my dogs are well behaved and it is theirs that are not.

  9. #29
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    That's what I have started to do also.....But have to wonder why Finn and I have to do it?

  10. #30
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    We have even have had to change the times of walking, so not to be subjected to snide remarks or "THE LOOK", of how dare you be walking your dog at this time of the day...........it is a sheer pleasure for us both at 6.30am and 9.00pm to have our walks (or runs) at those times for an hour, But this week, we have changed to earlier in the morning and later in the evening.....and yes we are again enjoying ourselves again.
    LOL, it's Autumn, who else would be out in this weather at that time, apart from my Husky and I!!

    But what I personally find sad, is that we have had to adapt, to find the time where we are enjoying ourselves again. We need to respect each other and the breeds we have all chosen to own.

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