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Thread: Breeds?

  1. #31
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    As you have seconded my opinion Belle, can you please elaborate and tell us why this is so. As in, the various medical and genetic reasons. Thanks.

    Without googling, perhaps?
    Last edited by Devil's Advocate; 05-04-2010 at 11:27 AM.
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  2. #32

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    Wow!
    Just wow!

    I seriously did not know this about Pugs.
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  3. #33
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    Neither did I.

    But I would have thought that a pug who has eyes who pop out of the socket would be by definition a "poorly bred pug" even if both its parents were Grand Champions.

    A bit like a labrador with hip problems. The breeder picked the wrong parents.

    It is a little scary though if the gene is recessive or most of the litter is fine and just one pup is an eye popper.

    Hopefully it will be reduced in future by not breeding from pugs who need to have their eyes stitched in. Yikes.

  4. #34

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    Sorry - still OT.

    I remain unconvinced after having asked some very long term pug breeders. It is common for their eyes to be dislodged following a blow to the head, attack from another dog or other injury, but not any more common than other breeds. This info coming from people who have spent around 30 years or more in the breed.

    This sort of thing is one of the things used as ammunition by DD breeders.

    I'll leave it there. Sorry again.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belle View Post
    Firstly, have a look at various rescue shelters - you can start by looking on the internet. It should tell you in the dog's description whether they are low maintenance or high, size and temperament.


    But, something medium sized and low maintenance, I would recommened a Beagle
    OMG You couldn't possibly call a beagle low maintanence!!!!! They are the druggies of the dog world on coke & acid!!!! NUTS is the way the woman who runs beagle rescue describes them. Maybe low maintanence in coat, but HIGH maintanence in activity. You have to be incredibly dedicated to be a beagle owner!!!! Lovely dogs, but WAY out of my league!!!
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jucealala View Post
    Di_Dee, don't get me wrong. We have time for a pup, and it will have Rox as a companion. Roxie just had a LOT of issues, if we get another rescue dog with as many problems as she had it won't work.
    I'm not an irresponsible person who is just going to throw the dog in the backyard and say 'heres a playmate, have fun'. I want to give the best I can to a pup, and be the best I can for Roxie as well. Having another rescue dog won't enable any of us to do that.
    Thanks though, I will keep an eye out on those sites for pups but generally they 'go' very quickly.

    Belle, my friend breeds pugs, they have a litter at the moment, they're so cute!

    We were kind of going for something a bit bigger though. I just found an ad for staffie x bull arab pups...I'm in love! That's a bit bigger than what we wanted though, lol.

    Thanks greysaregreat, I'll keep that in mind! Exercise is not an issue as Roxie gets two walks a day and sometimes a third with a friend.

    Cat, in my experience crosses are heartier. Every person I know with a purebred is always at the vet, they always have some sort of issue. We've always had crosses, my first dog didn't go to the vet for 14 years and lived til 16. We've also always gotten the underdog, the mistakes or dogs people didn't want. 'Picking' a puppy is a new experience.
    No vet for 14 yrs......does that mean no vaccinations either?
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat View Post
    Just because a dog is a rescue doesn't mean they are going to have problems. One of my dogs is a rescue and she has been the loveliest, easiest dog.
    However, you're more likely not to have problems if you get a purebred dog from a registered breeder. Getting a x from the paper is not really going to be that different than getting a x from a rescue (except for the whole supporting a byb than a rescue thing and I would think a rescue would have assessed temperaments more)
    Actually, I would like to add to this......the dog that Cat is referring to here was one of a litter of 4. This whole litter is exceptional in nature and just wonderful and yes, as they came through rescue, they had basic training and all the vet work they needed (not just desex) before they were rehomed.

    This particular litter was born "in care" and have proven themselves (all of them) to grow into spectacular specimans of the breed. Not X breds and all rescues. Food for thought!
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nattylou View Post
    Sorry - still OT.

    I remain unconvinced after having asked some very long term pug breeders. It is common for their eyes to be dislodged following a blow to the head, attack from another dog or other injury, but not any more common than other breeds. This info coming from people who have spent around 30 years or more in the breed.

    This sort of thing is one of the things used as ammunition by DD breeders.

    I'll leave it there. Sorry again.
    Lol. What's the 'sorry' for? We see it from different angles, is all.
    You see it from the perspective of Pug breeders who have bred excellent dogs who have obviously not encountered this problem to any degree, which is fantastic.

    I see it from a medical perspective due to the number of them needing the rectifying operation. Another breed which I have also personally seen it occur with rather easily is the Cav, for obvious reasons.
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  9. #39
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    Its called Prolapsed eyeball, and its incredibly rare.
    A tumor of the brain, a hard hit(and I mean hard) on the back of the head, a clamped bite on the back of the neck, anything that applies pressure to the front of the head, can result in the 'falling out' of an eyeball. Its quite serious, and you will notice.
    I will add, it can happen to any breed, dog or cat.
    I said earlier its more likely its to be found in BYB puppies, for obvious reasons, the lack of real health care put into the breeding of a Pug. Therefore their eyes may be more protruding in the first place.

    Its so unlikely it will ever happen to you though.
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shar Pei Rescue Victoria View Post
    OMG You couldn't possibly call a beagle low maintanence!!!!! They are the druggies of the dog world on coke & acid!!!! NUTS is the way the woman who runs beagle rescue describes them. Maybe low maintanence in coat, but HIGH maintanence in activity. You have to be incredibly dedicated to be a beagle owner!!!! Lovely dogs, but WAY out of my league!!!
    A beagle can be low maintanence IF you know what you are doing. Beagles are happy friendly dogs, who either want human companionship or another dog in the yard. They CAN be diggers but not ALL are, they can be escape artists but not ALL are. The nuts beagles are the ones that are not getting everything they need. My parents had a litter not that long ago and they are all calm sweet dogs, another person I know had a litter and one of them is NUTS and that is her temperment through no fault of the breeder or anything wrong with her or her environment, it is just who she is BUT it is easily managed with walks and mental stimulation. Agreed they are not as easy as whippets but they are not as hard as say an Alaskan Malamute or an Akita.

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